HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Azov Sea
The Sea
Sea
of Azov
Azov
(Russian: Азо́вское мо́ре, Azóvskoje móre; Ukrainian: Азо́вське мо́ре, Azóvśke móre; Crimean Tatar: Azaq deñizi, Азакъ денъизи, ازاق دﻩﯕىزى) is a sea in Eastern Europe. To the south it is linked by the narrow (about 4 km or 2.5 mi) Strait of Kerch
Strait of Kerch
to the Black Sea, and it is sometimes regarded as a northern extension of the Black Sea.[2][3] The sea is bounded in the north by mainland Ukraine, in the east by Russia, and in the west by the Crimean Peninsula. The Don and Kuban are the major rivers that flow into it
[...More...]

"Azov Sea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Donetsk Oblast
Donetsk
Donetsk
Oblast (Ukrainian: Доне́цька о́бласть, Donets'ka oblast', also referred to as Donechchyna, Ukrainian: Донеччина Donechchyna, Russian: Доне́цкая о́бласть, Donetskaya oblast [dɐˈnʲɛtskəjə ˈobɫəsʲtʲ]) is an oblast (province) of eastern Ukraine. It is the most populated oblast, with around 4.5 million residents. Its administrative center is Donetsk; however, its Regional State Administration was temporarily relocated to Mariupol
Mariupol
because of the ongoing crisis in Donetsk.[4] Historically, the region is an important part of the Donbas
Donbas
region
[...More...]

"Donetsk Oblast" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Black Sea Deluge Theory
The Black Sea
Black Sea
deluge is a hypothesized catastrophic rise in the level of the Black Sea
Black Sea
circa 5600 BC from waters from the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea breaching a sill in the Bosphorus
Bosphorus
strait. The hypothesis was headlined when The New York Times
The New York Times
published it in December 1996.[1] It was later published in an academic journal in April 1997.[2] While it is agreed that the sequence of events described by the hypothesis occurred, there is significant debate over the suddenness, dating and magnitude of the events. Over geological eras, water has flowed in and out of the Black Sea
Black Sea
basin
[...More...]

"Black Sea Deluge Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
[...More...]

"Classical Antiquity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Maeotis Swamp
The Maeotian Swamp (Ancient Greek: ἡ Μαιῶτις λίμνη, ē Maiōtis límnē; Latin: Palus Maeotis) was a name applied in antiquity variously to the swamps at the mouth of the Tanais River in Scythia (the modern Don in southern Russia) and to the entire Sea of Azov which it forms there. The sea was also known as the Maeotian Lake (Latin: Mæotis Lacus) among other names.[1] The people who lived around the sea were known as the Maeotians, although it remains unclear which was named for which.[1] The Ixomates were a tribe of the Maeotes. To the south of the Maeotes, east of the Crimea were the Sindes, their lands known as Scythia Sindica. The marshes served to check the westward migration of nomad peoples from the steppe of Central Asia. The Iazyges, a Sarmatian tribe, were first heard of on the Maeotis, where they were among the allies of Mithridates II of Parthia
[...More...]

"Maeotis Swamp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maeotians
The Maeotians
Maeotians
(Ancient Greek: Μαιῶται, Maiōtai; Latin: Mæotæ[1]) were an ancient people dwelling along the Sea of Azov, which was known in antiquity as the "Maeotian marshes" or "Lake Maeotis".[2]Contents1 Identity 2 History 3 References 4 SourcesIdentity[edit] The etymology of the name and identity of the people remain unclear. Edward James [2] and William Smith[citation needed] were of the opinion that the term Maeotian was applied broadly to various peoples around the Sea of Azov, rather than the name of the sea deriving from a certain people. Their subdivisions included the Sindi, the Dandarii, the Toreatae, the Agri, the Arrechi, the Tarpetes, the Obidiaceni, the Sittaceni, the Dosci, and "many" others.[3] Of these, the Sindi are the best attested, and were probably the dominant people among the Maeotians.[4] The language of the Maeotians
Maeotians
or even language family is uncertain
[...More...]

"Maeotians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Exonym
An exonym or xenonym is an external name for a geographical place, or a group of people, an individual person, or a language or dialect. It is a common name used only outside the place, group, or linguistic community in question. An endonym or autonym is an internal name for a geographical place, or a group of people, or a language or dialect
[...More...]

"Exonym" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pliny The Elder
Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(born Gaius Plinius Secundus, AD 23–79) was a Roman author, naturalist and natural philosopher, a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire, and friend of emperor Vespasian. Spending most of his spare time studying, writing, and investigating natural and geographic phenomena in the field, Pliny wrote the encyclopedic Naturalis Historia
Naturalis Historia
(Natural History), which became an editorial model for encyclopedias. His nephew, Pliny the Younger, wrote of him in a letter to the historian Tacitus:For my part I deem those blessed to whom, by favour of the gods, it has been granted either to do what is worth writing of, or to write what is worth reading; above measure blessed those on whom both gifts have been conferred
[...More...]

"Pliny The Elder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sudak
Sudak
Sudak
(Ukrainian: Судак; Russian: Судак; Crimean Tatar: Sudaq; Greek: Σουγδαία; sometimes spelled Sudac or Sudagh) is a town, multiple former Eastern Orthodox bishopric and double Latin Catholic titular see. It is of regional significance in Crimea, a territory recognized by most countries as part of Ukraine
Ukraine
but annexed by Russia
Russia
as the Republic
Republic
of Crimea. Sudak
Sudak
serves as the administrative center of Sudak
Sudak
Municipality, one of the regions Crimea is divided into. It is situated 57 km (35 mi) to the west of Feodosia
Feodosia
(the nearest railway station) and 104 km (65 mi) to the east of Simferopol, the republic's capital
[...More...]

"Sudak" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ottoman Turkish Language
Ottoman Turkish (/ˈɒtəmən/; Turkish: Osmanlı Türkçesi), or the Ottoman language (Ottoman Turkish: لسان عثمانى‎, lisân-ı Osmânî, also known as تركجه‎, Türkçe or تركی‎, Türkî, "Turkish"; Turkish: Osmanlıca), is the variety of the Turkish language
Turkish language
that was used in the Ottoman Empire. It borrows, in all aspects, extensively from Arabic
Arabic
and Persian, and it was written in the Ottoman Turkish alphabet
[...More...]

"Ottoman Turkish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
[...More...]

"Neolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Folk Etymology
Folk etymology or reanalysis – sometimes called pseudo-etymology, popular etymology, or analogical reformation – is a change in a word or phrase resulting from the replacement of an unfamiliar form by a more familiar one.[1][2][3] The form or the meaning of an archaic, foreign, or otherwise unfamiliar word is reanalyzed as resembling more familiar words or morphemes. Rebracketing is a form of folk etymology in which a word is broken down or "bracketed" into a new set of supposed elements
[...More...]

"Folk Etymology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University
(Columbia; officially Columbia University
Columbia University
in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Columbia contains the oldest college in the state of New York and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the United States, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence.[9] It was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain
George II of Great Britain
and renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the American Revolutionary War. The college has produced numerous distinguished alumni
[...More...]

"Columbia University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bosporus
The Bosporus
Bosporus
(/ˈbɒspərəs/) or Bosphorus (/ˈbɒspərəs/ or /ˈbɒsfərəs/);[1] Greek: Βόσπορος, Bósporos [ˈvos.po.ros], Ancient Greek: Βόσπορος, Bósporos [bós.po.ros]; Turkish: İstanbul Boğazı, [isˈtanbuɫ bo‿aˈzɯ]) is a narrow, natural strait and an internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey. It forms part of the continental boundary between Europe
Europe
and Asia, and separates Asian Turkey
Turkey
from European Turkey
[...More...]

"Bosporus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.