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Aylesbury Vale
The Aylesbury
Aylesbury
Vale (or Vale of Aylesbury) is a large area of gently rolling agricultural landscape located in the northern half of Buckinghamshire, England. Its boundary is marked by the Borough of Milton Keynes
Milton Keynes
and South Northamptonshire
South Northamptonshire
to the north, Central Bedfordshire and the Borough of Dacorum
Borough of Dacorum
(Hertfordshire) to the east, the Chiltern Hills
Chiltern Hills
and Wycombe to south, and South Oxfordshire
South Oxfordshire
to the west. The vale is named after Aylesbury, the county town of Buckinghamshire. Two other towns lie within the vale and they are Winslow and Buckingham. The bed of the vale is largely made up of clay that was formed at the end of the ice age
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Liberal Democrats (UK)
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom, formed in 1988 as a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party. The two parties had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance
SDP–Liberal Alliance
for seven years before this. At the 2010 general election, led by Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrats won 57 seats, making them the third-largest party in the House of Commons, behind the Conservatives with 306 and Labour with 258.[18] With no party having an overall majority, the Lib Dems agreed to join a coalition government with the Conservatives, with Clegg becoming Deputy Prime Minister and other party members taking up ministerial positions.[19] At the 2015 general election, the party was reduced to eight MPs, and Clegg resigned as party leader.[20] They were replaced from their longstanding position as the third largest party by the SNP
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Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
(/ˈhɑːrtfərdʃɪər/ ( listen)[n 1]; often abbreviated Herts) is a county in southern England, bordered by Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the north-east, Essex
Essex
to the east, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
to the west and Greater London
Greater London
to the south. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England
England
region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700[2] living in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2).[3] Four towns have between 50,000 and 100,000 residents: Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford
Watford
and St Albans
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UTC+1
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-07T11:14:27+01:00.Contents1
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ONS Coding System
In the United Kingdom, the Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
maintains a series of codes to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data. These codes are referred to as ONS codes or GSS codes referring to the Government Statistical Service of which ONS is part. The previous hierarchical system of codes has been replaced as from January 2011[1] by a nine-character code for all types of geography, in which there is no relation between the code for a lower-tier area and the corresponding parent area
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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South Northamptonshire
South Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
is a district in Northamptonshire, England. Its council is based in the town of Towcester, first established as a settlement in Roman Britain. The population of the Local Authority District Council in 2011 was 85,189.[1] The largest town in the district is Brackley, which had a population of 14,000 in 2008[2] followed by Towcester
Towcester
which has a population of nearly 10,000.[2] Other significant settlements in size include Deanshanger, Bugbrooke, Roade, King's Sutton, Silverstone
Silverstone
and Middleton Cheney
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Central Bedfordshire
Central Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
is a unitary authority area in the ceremonial county of Bedfordshire, England. It was created from the merger of Mid Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
and South Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
District Councils on 1 April 2009.[1] With a budget of £500m the unitary council provides over a hundred services to a quarter of a million people, and is responsible for schools, social services, rubbish collection, roads, planning, leisure centres, libraries, care homes and more.[2][3]Contents1 Administrative history 2 Elections 3 Towns and villages 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAdministrative history[edit] The county of Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
was abolished on 1 April 2009
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Borough Of Dacorum
The Borough of Dacorum is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England that includes the towns of Hemel Hempstead, Berkhamsted, Tring and the western part of Kings Langley. The district, which was formed in 1974, had a population of 137,799 in 2001.[1] Its name was taken from the old hundred of Dacorum which covered approximately the same area.Contents1 History 2 Main settlements 3 Political representation3.1 Composition 3.2 Wards 3.3 Political control4 Town twinning 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The name Dacorum comes from Latin and it means "hundred of the Dacians". The latter word was used mistakenly in the Middle Ages for 'Danes'. This happened because of a legend asserting that certain tribes from Dacia had migrated to Denmark.[2] The hundred of Dacorum was first recorded in 1196, although it has existed since the 9th and 10th centuries, when it lay near the southern boundary of the Danelaw, on the River Lea
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Chiltern Hills
The Chiltern Hills
Chiltern Hills
form a chalk escarpment[1] in South East England. They are known locally as "the Chilterns".[1] A large portion of the hills was designated officially as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in 1965.Contents1 Location 2 Geology 3 Physical characteristics3.1 Topography 3.2 Landscape and land use 3.3 Rivers 3.4 Transport routes4 History 5 Settlement5.1 List of towns and villages in the Chiltern hills area 5.2 Strip parishes associated with the Chilterns6 Economic use 7 Protection7.1 Chilterns Conservation Board 7
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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Clay
Clay
Clay
is a finely-grained natural rock or soil material that combines one or more clay minerals with possible traces of quartz (SiO4), metal oxides (Al2O3 , MgO etc.) and organic matter. Geologic clay deposits are mostly composed of phyllosilicate minerals containing variable amounts of water trapped in the mineral structure. Clays are plastic due to particle size and geometry as well as water content, and become hard, brittle and non–plastic upon drying or firing.[1][2][3] Depending on the soil's content in which it is found, clay can appear in various colours from white to dull grey or brown to deep orange-red.Electron microscope photograph of smectite clay – magnification 23,500Although many naturally occurring deposits include both silts and clay, clays are distinguished from other fine-grained soils by differences in size and mineralogy
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Ice Age
An ice age is a period of long-term reduction in the temperature of Earth's surface and atmosphere, resulting in the presence or expansion of continental and polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within a long-term ice age, individual pulses of cold climate are termed "glacial periods" (or alternatively "glacials" or "glaciations" or colloquially as "ice age"), and intermittent warm periods are called "interglacials". In the terminology of glaciology, ice age implies the presence of extensive ice sheets in both northern and southern hemispheres.[1] By this definition, we are in an interglacial period—the Holocene—of the ice age
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Water Table
The water table is the upper surface of the zone of saturation. The zone of saturation is where the pores and fractures of the ground are saturated with water.[1] The water table is the surface where the water pressure head is equal to the atmospheric pressure (where gauge pressure = 0). It may be visualized as the "surface" of the subsurface materials that are saturated with groundwater in a given vicinity.[2] The groundwater may be from precipitation or from groundwater flowing into the aquifer. In areas with sufficient precipitation, water infiltrates through pore spaces in the soil, passing through the unsaturated zone. At increasing depths, water fills in more of the pore spaces in the soils, until a zone of saturation is reached. Below the water table, in the phreatic zone (zone of saturation), layers of permeable rock that yield groundwater are called aquifers
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations
United Nations
defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years
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County Town
A county town in Great Britain
Great Britain
or Ireland
Ireland
is usually, but not always, the location of administrative or judicial functions within the county. The concept of a county town is ill-defined and unoffical. Following the establishment of County
County
Councils in 1889, the administrative headquarters of the new authorities were usually located in the county town of each county. However, this was not always the case and the idea of a "county town" pre-dates the establishment of these councils. For example, Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire
Lancashire
but the county council is located at Preston.. The county town was often where the county members of parliament were elected or where certain judicial functions were carried out, leading it to becoming established as the most important town in the county. Some county towns are no longer situated within the administrative county
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