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Awilix
Awilix
Awilix
(/äwiˈliʃ/) (also spelt Auilix and Avilix) was a goddess (or possibly a god) of the Postclassic K'iche' Maya, who had a large kingdom in the highlands of Guatemala.[1] She was the patron deity of the Nija'ib' noble lineage at the K'iche' capital Q'umarkaj, with a large temple in the city
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Mesoamerican Chronology
Mesoamerican chronology
Mesoamerican chronology
divides the history of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
into several periods: the Paleo-Indian (first human habitation–3500 BCE), the Archaic (3500–2000 BCE), the Preclassic or Formative (2000 BCE–200 CE), the Classic (200–1000 CE), and the Postclassic (1000–1697 CE). Some of the period divisions are taken from the history of the Maya: The Preclassic-Classic boundary marks the first Maya "collapse", the Classic-Postclassic boundary marks the second, and the end date of 1697 marks the conquest of the last independent Maya city-state, Tayasal
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James, Son Of Zebedee
James, son of Zebedee
Zebedee
(Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב‬, Yaʿqob, Greek: Ἰάκωβος ,Coptic: ⲓⲁⲕⲱⲃⲟⲥ; died 44 AD) was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus, and traditionally considered the first apostle to be martyred. He was a son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and Salome, and brother of John the Apostle. He is also called James the Greater or James the Great to distinguish him from James, son of Alphaeus
James, son of Alphaeus
and James the brother of Jesus
Jesus
(James the Just)
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Talud-tablero
Talud-tablero
Talud-tablero
is an architectural style most commonly used in platforms, temples, and pyramids in Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
Mesoamerica, becoming popular in the Early Classic Period of Teotihuacan. Talud-tablero
Talud-tablero
consists of an inward-sloping surface or panel called the talud, with a panel or structure perpendicular to the ground sitting upon the slope called the tablero
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Iximche
Iximche
Iximche
(/iʃimˈtʃe/) (or Iximché using Spanish orthography) is a Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
Mesoamerican archaeological site in the western highlands of Guatemala. Iximche
Iximche
was the capital of the Late Postclassic Kaqchikel Maya kingdom from 1470 until its abandonment in 1524. The architecture of the site included a number of pyramid-temples, palaces and two Mesoamerican ballcourts. Excavators uncovered the poorly preserved remains of painted murals on some of the buildings and ample evidence of human sacrifice. The ruins of Iximche
Iximche
were declared a Guatemalan National Monument in the 1960s.[1] The site has a small museum displaying a number of pieces found there, including sculptures and ceramics
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Kaqchikel People
The Kaqchikel (also called Kachiquel[3]) are one of the indigenous Maya peoples
Maya peoples
of the midwestern highlands in Guatemala. The name was formerly spelled in various other ways, including Cakchiquel, Cakchiquel, Kakchiquel, Caqchikel, and Cachiquel. In Postclassic Maya times the capital of the main branch of the Kaqchikel was Iximché. Like the neighboring K'iche' (Quiché), they were governed by four lords: Tzotzil, Xahil, Tucuché and Acajal, who were responsible for the administrative, military and religious affairs. The Kakchikel recorded their history in the book Annals of the Cakchiquels, also known as Memorial de Sololá[4]. The Chajoma
Chajoma
were another Kaqchikel-speaking people; the ruins of Mixco Viejo have been identified as their capital. Iximché
Iximché
was conquered by the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Alvarado in 1524
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Mam People
The Mam are an indigenous people in the western highlands of Guatemala and in south-western Mexico
Mexico
who speak the Mam language. Most Mam (617,171) live in Guatemala, in the departments of Huehuetenango, San Marcos, and Quetzaltenango.[3][4] The Mam people
Mam people
in Mexico
Mexico
(23,632) live principally in the soconusco region of Chiapas.[2] In pre-Columbian times the Mam were part of the Maya civilization; the pre-Columbian capital of the Mam kingdom was Zaculeu. Many Mam live in and around the nearby modern city of Huehuetenango. The city of Quetzaltenango
Quetzaltenango
or Xela was originally Mam. Many more Mam live in small hamlets in the mountains of northern Guatemala, keeping many of their native traditions
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Balustrade
A baluster—also called spindle or stair stick[citation needed]—is a moulded shaft, square or of lathe-turned form, cut from a rectangular or square plank, one of various forms of spindle in woodwork, made of stone or wood and sometimes of metal,[1] standing on a unifying footing, and supporting the coping of a parapet or the handrail of a staircase.[2] Multiplied in this way, they form a balustrade.[3] Individually, a baluster shaft may describe the turned form taken by a brass or silver candlestick, an upright furniture support, or the stem of a brass chandelier, etc.A balustradeSwelling form of the half-open flower of Punica granatum, in Italian balaustraContents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Profiles and style changes 4 Modern materials used 5 Banisters 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] According to OED, "baluster" is derived through the French: balustre, from Italian: balaustro, from balaustra, "pomegranate flower" [from
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Perpendicular
In elementary geometry, the property of being perpendicular (perpendicularity) is the relationship between two lines which meet at a right angle (90 degrees). The property extends to other related geometric objects. A line is said to be perpendicular to another line if the two lines intersect at a right angle.[2] Explicitly, a first line is perpendicular to a second line if (1) the two lines meet; and (2) at the point of intersection the straight angle on one side of the first line is cut by the second line into two congruent angles. Perpendicularity can be shown to be symmetric, meaning if a first line is perpendicular to a second line, then the second line is also perpendicular to the first. For this reason, we may speak of two lines as being perpendicular (to each other) without specifying an order. Perpendicularity easily extends to segments and rays
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Momostenango
Momostenango
Momostenango
is a municipality in the Totonicapán
Totonicapán
department of Guatemala
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Syncretism
Syncretism
Syncretism
(/ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm/) is the combining of different beliefs, while blending practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism
Syncretism
involves the merging or assimilation of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths
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Robert Carmack
Robert M. Carmack (born 1934)[1] is an academic anthropologist and Mesoamericanist scholar who is most noted for his studies of the history, culture and societies of contemporary Maya peoples. In particular he has conducted extensive research on the K'iche' (Quiché) Mayas of the Guatemalan Highlands in the context of the infiltration and migration of Nahuatl speaking peoples into the Maya cultural areas. Carmack is an emeritus professor of anthropology at the State University of New York at Albany who for the last few years has been working as a senior Fulbright Scholar
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K'iche' People
1,610,013[1] 11% of Guatemalan population[1]Regions with significant populations Guatemala 1,610,013[1]Quiché 622,163[1]Totonicapán 453,237[1]Quetzaltenango 205,228[1]Sololá 151,992[1]LanguagesK'iche', SpanishReligionCatholic, Evangelicalist, Maya religionRelated ethnic groupsKaqchikel, Tzutujil, Uspantek, SakapultekK'iche' (pronounced [kʼi ˈtʃeʔ]; previous Spanish spelling: Quiché)[2] are indigenous peoples of the Americas and are one of the Maya peoples. The K'iche' language is a Mesoamerican language in the Mayan language family. The highland K'iche' states in the pre-Columbian era are associated with the ancient Maya civilization, and reached the peak of their power and influence during the Postclassic period. The meaning of the word K'iche' is "many trees." The Nahuatl
Nahuatl
translation, Cuauhtēmallān "Place of the Many Trees (People)", is the origin of the word Guatemala
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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