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Aviators
An aircraft pilot or aviator is a person who controls the flight of an aircraft by operating its directional flight controls. Some other aircrew members, such as navigators or flight engineers, are also considered aviators, because they are involved in operating the aircraft's navigation and engine systems. Other aircrew members such as flight attendants, mechanics and ground crew, are not classified as aviators. In recognition of the pilots' qualifications and responsibilities, most militaries and many airlines worldwide award aviator badges to their pilots, and this includes naval aviators.Contents1 History 2 Civilian2.1 Airline2.1.1 Automation2.2 Africa
Africa
and Asia 2.3 Canada 2.4 United States3 Military 4 Unmanned aerial vehicles 5 Space 6 Pilot certifications 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Hot air balloon
Hot air balloon
pilot and passenger in basketThis section needs expansion
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Artificial Intelligence
Artificial intelligence
Artificial intelligence
(AI, also machine intelligence, MI) is intelligence demonstrated by machines, in contrast to the natural intelligence (NI) displayed by humans and other animals
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Airliner
An airliner is a type of aircraft for transporting passengers and air cargo. Such aircraft are most often operated by airlines. Although the definition of an airliner can vary from country to country, an airliner is typically defined as an aircraft intended for carrying multiple passengers or cargo in commercial service. The largest airliners are wide-body jets. These aircraft are frequently called twin-aisle aircraft because they generally have two separate aisles running from the front to the back of the passenger cabin. These aircraft are usually used for long-haul flights between airline hubs and major cities with many passengers. A smaller, more common class of airliners is the narrow-body or single aisle aircraft. These smaller airliners are generally used for short to medium-distance flights with fewer passengers than their wide-body counterparts. Regional airliners typically seat fewer than 100 passengers and may be powered by turbofans or turboprops
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Robert Esnault-Pelterie
Robert Albert Charles Esnault-Pelterie (November 8, 1881 – December 6, 1957) was a pioneering French aircraft designer and spaceflight theorist
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Aviation Insurance
Aviation
Aviation
insurance is insurance coverage geared specifically to the operation of aircraft and the risks involved in aviation. Aviation insurance policies are distinctly different from those for other areas of transportation and tend to incorporate aviation terminology, as well as terminology, limits and clauses specific to aviation insurance.Contents1 History 2 Types of insurance2.1 Public liability insurance 2.2 Passenger liability insurance 2.3 Combined Single Limit (CSL) 2.4 Ground risk hull insurance not in motion 2.5 Ground risk hull insurance in motion (taxiing) 2.6 In-flight insurance3 ReferencesHistory[edit] Aviation
Aviation
Insurance
Insurance
was first introduced in the early years of the 20th century. The first-ever aviation insurance policy was written by Lloyd's of London
Lloyd's of London
in 1911
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Jet Pilot (other)
Jet Pilot
Jet Pilot
may refer to:Jet pilot Jet Pilot
Jet Pilot
(horse), an American Thoroughbred racehorse Jet Pilot
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Boeing 777
The Boeing
Boeing
777 is a family of long-range wide-body twin-engine jet airliners developed and manufactured by Boeing
Boeing
Commercial Airplanes. It is the world's largest twinjet and has a typical seating capacity of 314 to 396 passengers, with a range of 5,240 to 8,555 nautical miles (9,704 to 15,844 km). Commonly referred to as the "Triple Seven",[4][5] its distinguishing features include the largest-diameter turbofan engines of any aircraft, long raked wings, six wheels on each main landing gear, fully circular fuselage cross-section,[6] and a blade-shaped tail cone.[7] Developed in consultation with eight major airlines, the 777 was designed to replace older wide-body airliners and bridge the capacity difference between Boeing's 767 and 747. As Boeing's first fly-by-wire airliner, it has computer-mediated controls
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Pilot In Command
The pilot in command (PIC) of an aircraft is the person aboard the aircraft who is ultimately responsible for its operation and safety during flight. This would be the captain in a typical two- or three-pilot aircrew, or "pilot" if there is only one certificated and qualified pilot at the controls of an aircraft. The PIC must be legally certificated (or otherwise authorized) to operate the aircraft for the specific flight and flight conditions, but need not be actually manipulating the controls at any given moment. The PIC is the person legally in charge of the aircraft and its flight safety and operation, and would normally be the primary person liable for an infraction of any flight rule. The strict legal definition of PIC may vary slightly from country to country
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Airline
An airline is a company that provides air transport services for traveling passengers and freight. Airlines utilize aircraft to supply these services and may form partnerships or alliances with other airlines for codeshare agreements. Generally, airline companies are recognized with an air operating certificate or license issued by a governmental aviation body. Airlines vary in size, from small domestic airlines to full-service international airlines. Airline
Airline
services can be categorized as being intercontinental, domestic, regional, or international, and may be operated as scheduled services or charters. The largest airline currently is American Airlines
American Airlines
Group.Contents1 History1.1 The first airlines 1.2 European airline industry1.2.1 Beginnings 1.2.2 Rationalization 1.2.3 Global expansion 1.2.4 EU airline deregulation1.3 U.S
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CAE Inc.
CAE Inc.
CAE Inc.
(formerly Canadian Aviation Electronics) is a Canadian manufacturer of simulation technologies, modelling technologies and training services to airlines, aircraft manufacturers, healthcare specialists, and defense customers. CAE was founded in 1947, and has manufacturing operations and training facilities in 35 countries. In 2017, the company's annual revenue was CAD $2.705 billion.[1]Contents1 Flight Simulators 2 Pilot training 3 Healthcare 4 Corporate governance 5 References 6 External linksFlight Simulators[edit]Full flight simulators at the CAE centre in BrusselsCAE sells flight simulators and training devices to airlines, aircraft manufacturers and training centres. It licenses its simulation software to various market segments and has a professional services division. The simulators include basic training devices CAE 400XR and CAE 500XR, and full-motion products such as the CAE 3000, CAE 5000 and CAE 7000XR
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Boeing
The Boeing
Boeing
Company (/ˈboʊ.ɪŋ/) is an American multinational corporation that designs, manufactures, and sells airplanes, rotorcraft, rockets, and satellites worldwide. The company also provides leasing and product support services
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Capacity Utilization
Capacity utilization
Capacity utilization
or capacity utilisation is the extent to which an enterprise or a nation uses its installed productive capacity. It is the relationship between output that is produced with the installed equipment, and the potential output which could be produced with it, if capacity was fully used.Contents1 Engineering and economic measures1.1 Engineering definition 1.2 Economic definition 1.3 Measurement2 Economic significance2.1 Modern business cycle theory3 Output gap percentage formula 4 FRB and ISM utilization indexes 5 Data5.1 Average utilization rate6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEngineering and economic measures[edit] One of the most used definitions of the "capacity utilization rate" is the ratio of actual output to the potential output
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Corporate Aviation
Commercial aviation
Commercial aviation
is the part of civil aviation (both general aviation and scheduled airline services) that involves operating aircraft for hire to transport passengers or multiple loads of cargo.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Post-war aviation2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The Air Commerce Act of 1926
Air Commerce Act of 1926
began to regularize commercial aviation by establishing standards, facilitation, and promotion. An Aeronautical Branch was established in the Department of Commerce with William P. MacCracken, Jr.
William P. MacCracken, Jr.
as director
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Global 6000
The Bombardier Global Express
Bombardier Global Express
is a large cabin, ultra long range business jet manufactured by Bombardier Aerospace
Bombardier Aerospace
in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[3] There are currently three variants in active service — the original Global Express, Global 5000 & Global 6000 — and two more under development — the Global 7000 & Global 8000. The Global Express has been modified for military missions, such as the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Raytheon
Raytheon
Sentinel, the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
E-11A and United Arab Emirates Air Force
United Arab Emirates Air Force
GlobalEye Swing Role Surveillance System.[4][5][6] The Global Express can fly intercontinental ranges without refuelling (e.g
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American Airlines
American Airlines, Inc. (AA) is a major U.S. airline headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, within the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. It is the world's largest airline when measured by fleet size, revenue, scheduled passengers carried, scheduled passenger-kilometers flown, and number of destinations served. American together with its regional partners operates an extensive international and domestic network with an average of nearly 6,700 flights per day to nearly 350 destinations in more than 50 countries.[8] American Airlines
American Airlines
is a founding member of Oneworld
Oneworld
alliance, the third largest airline alliance in the world and coordinates fares, services, and scheduling with alliance partners British Airways, Iberia, and Finnair
Finnair
in the transatlantic market and with Cathay Pacific
Cathay Pacific
and Japan Airlines in the transpacific market
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Seniority List
Seniority is the concept of a person or group of people taking precedence over another person or group because the former is either older than the latter or has occupied a particular position longer than the latter. Seniority is present between parents and children and may be present in other common relationships, such as among siblings of different ages or between workers and their managers. Under a seniority system, control is often granted to senior persons due to length of service in a given position. When persons of senior rank have less length of service than their subordinates, "seniority" may apply to either concept.Contents1 In armed forces 2 In politics 3 In employment3.1 In transport4 See also 5 ReferencesIn armed forces[edit] In some military command structures, the length of time someone has held a particular rank is called "seniority in grade" and determines whether that person is senior to another person of the same rank
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