HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Aviation Ordnanceman
Aviation ordnanceman
Aviation ordnanceman
(abbreviated as AO) is a United States Navy occupational rating.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]An aviation ordnanceman reinstalls an M-61A1 20-mm Gatling gun in the gun bay of an F/A-18C Hornet aircraft in 2008.Aviation ordnancemen operate and handle aviation ordnance equipment. They are responsible for the maintenance of guns, bombs, torpedoes, rockets, and missiles. Their duties include the stowing, issuing, and loading of munitions and small arms. There are three different types of ordnanceman; "O" (organizational) level, "I" (intermediate) level, and "D" (depot) level. O-level ordnanceman are attached to squadrons ashore and afloat. They perform loading/downloading operations on aircraft as well as maintenance on bomb racks, missile launchers, and other aircraft components
[...More...]

"Aviation Ordnanceman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naval Rating
A naval rating is an enlisted member of a country's navy, subordinate to warrant officers and officers, and hence not conferred by commission or warrant
[...More...]

"Naval Rating" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of United States Navy Ratings
United States Navy
United States Navy
ratings are general enlisted occupations used by the U.S. Navy from the 18th century, which consisted of specific skills and abilities. Each naval rating had its own specialty badge, which is worn on the left sleeve of the uniform by each enlisted person in that particular field. Working uniforms, such as coveralls and the camouflage Naval Working Uniform, bear generic rate designators with no rating insignia attached. For a brief period from September 2016 to December 2016, ratings were not used. However, they were reintroduced in December 2016 and remain in use.[1] Just as a naval officer has rank, not a rate, an officer's occupation (if drawn more narrowly than an officer of the line) is classified according to designators for both officers of the line (e.g., line officers) and those of the professional staff corps.[2] Ratings should not be confused with rates, which describe the Navy's enlisted pay-grades and ratings
[...More...]

"List Of United States Navy Ratings" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Attack On Pearl Harbor
Coordinates: 21°22′N 157°57′W / 21.367°N 157.950°W / 21.367; -157.950Attack on Pearl HarborPart of the Asia and the Pacific Theater of World War IIPhotograph of Battleship Row
Battleship Row
taken from a Japanese plane at the beginning of the attack. The explosion in the center is a torpedo strike on USS West Virginia. Two attacking Japanese planes can be seen: one over USS Neosho and one over the Naval Yard.Date December 7, 1941; 76 years ago (1941-12-07)Location Primarily Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, U.S.ResultMajor Japanese tactical victory; precipitated the entrance of the United States
United States
into World War IISee consequences of the attack on Pearl HarborBelligerents United States  JapanCommanders and leaders ADM Husband E
[...More...]

"Attack On Pearl Harbor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medal Of Honor
The Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
is the United States
United States
of America's highest and most prestigious personal military decoration that may be awarded to recognize U.S. military service members who distinguished themselves by acts of valor.[5] The medal is normally awarded by the President of the United States
United States
in the name of the U.S. Congress. Because the medal is presented "in the name of Congress", it is often referred to informally as the "Congressional Medal of Honor". However, the official name of the current award is "Medal of Honor", as it began with the U.S. Army's version.[1][6] Within United States
United States
Code the medal is referred to as the "Medal of Honor",[7] and less frequently as "Congressional Medal of Honor".[8] U.S
[...More...]

"Medal Of Honor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flight Deck
The flight deck of an aircraft carrier is the surface from which its aircraft take off and land, essentially a miniature airfield at sea. On smaller naval ships which do not have aviation as a primary mission, the landing area for helicopters and other VTOL
VTOL
aircraft is also referred to as the flight deck. The official U.S. Navy term for these vessels is "air-capable ships".[1]Contents1 Evolution1.1 Early flight decks 1.2 Full length decks 1.3 Armored decks2 Landing on flight decks 3 Modern innovations3.1 Angled flight deck 3.2 Ski-jump 3.3 Flexible decks4 Other 5 See also 6 ReferencesEvolution[edit]Eugene Ely's first landing, on the armored cruiser USS PennsylvaniaEarly flight decks[edit] The first flight decks were inclined wooden ramps built over the forecastle of warships
[...More...]

"Flight Deck" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aircraft Carrier
An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft.[1] Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighter planes, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. Whilst heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets
[...More...]

"Aircraft Carrier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Texas
Texas
Texas
(/ˈtɛksəs/, locally /-sɪz/; Spanish: Texas
Texas
or Tejas [ˈtexas]) is the second largest state in the United States
United States
by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas
Texas
shares borders with the U.S
[...More...]

"Texas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corpus Christi, Texas
Corpus Christi (/ˌkɔːrpəs ˈkrɪsti/), colloquially Corpus (Latin: Body of Christ), is a coastal city in the South Texas
Texas
region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas. The county seat of Nueces County,[6] it also extends into Aransas, Kleberg, and San Patricio Counties. It is 130 miles southeast of San Antonio. Its political boundaries encompass Nueces Bay
Nueces Bay
and Corpus Christi Bay. Its zoned boundaries include small land parcels or water inlets of three neighboring counties. The city's population was estimated to be 320,434 in 2014, making it the eighth-most populous city in Texas. The Corpus Christi metropolitan area had an estimated population of 442,600.[1] It is also the hub of the six-county Corpus Christi-Kingsville-Alice Combined Statistical Area, with a 2013 estimated population of 516,793
[...More...]

"Corpus Christi, Texas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery
Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery
(ASVAB) is a multiple choice test, administered by the United States
United States
Military Entrance Processing Command, used to determine qualification for enlistment in the United States
United States
Armed Forces
[...More...]

"Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

20/20 Vision
Visual acuity (VA) commonly refers to the clarity of vision. Visual acuity is dependent on optical and neural factors, i.e., (i) the sharpness of the retinal focus within the eye, (ii) the health and functioning of the retina, and (iii) the sensitivity of the interpretative faculty of the brain.[1] A common cause of low visual acuity is refractive error (ametropia), or errors in how the light is refracted in the eyeball. Causes of refractive errors include aberrations in the shape of the eyeball, the shape of the cornea, and reduced flexibility of the lens. Too high or too low refractive error (in relation to the length of the eyeball) is the cause of nearsightedness (myopia) or farsightedness (hyperopia) (normal refractive status is referred to as emmetropia). Other optical causes are astigmatism or more complex corneal irregularities
[...More...]

"20/20 Vision" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Color Perception
Color
Color
vision is the ability of an organism or machine to distinguish objects based on the wavelengths (or frequencies) of the light they reflect, emit, or transmit. Colors can be measured and quantified in various ways; indeed, a person's perception of colors is a subjective process whereby the brain responds to the stimuli that are produced when incoming light reacts with the several types of cone cells in the eye
[...More...]

"Color Perception" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting or dépanneuring is a form of problem solving, often applied to repair failed products or processes on a machine or a system. It is a logical, systematic search for the source of a problem in order to solve it, and make the product or process operational again. Troubleshooting is needed to identify the symptoms. Determining the most likely cause is a process of elimination—eliminating potential causes of a problem. Finally, troubleshooting requires confirmation that the solution restores the product or process to its working state. In general, troubleshooting is the identification or diagnosis of "trouble" in the management flow of a corporation or a system caused by a failure of some kind
[...More...]

"Troubleshooting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.