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Avellino Eruption
The Avellino
Avellino
eruption of Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
refers to a Plinian-type eruption that occurred in the 2nd millennium BC
2nd millennium BC
and is estimated to have had a VEI of 6
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Avellino (other)
Avellino
Avellino
is a town and comune, capital of the province of Avellino
Avellino
in the Campania region of southern Italy. Avellino
Avellino
may also refer to:Province of Avellino, a province in the Campania region of Italy Avellino
Avellino
(surname) Air Avellino, aka S.S. Felice Scandone, Italian basketball club Avellino
Avellino
eruption, eruption of Mount Vesuvius in the 2nd millennium BC U.S
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Livestock
Livestock
Livestock
are domesticated animals raised in an agricultural setting to produce labor and commodities such as meat, eggs, milk, fur, leather, and wool. The term is sometimes used to refer solely to those that are bred for consumption, while other times it refers only to farmed ruminants, such as cattle and goats.[1] In recent years, some organizations have also raised livestock to promote the survival of rare breeds. The breeding, maintenance, and slaughter of these animals, known as animal husbandry, is a component of modern agriculture that has been practiced in many cultures since humanity's transition to farming from hunter-gatherer lifestyles. Animal
Animal
husbandry practices have varied widely across cultures and time periods. Originally, livestock were not confined by fences or enclosures, but these practices have largely shifted to intensive animal farming, sometimes referred to as "factory farming"
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Before Present
Before Present (BP) years is a time scale used mainly in geology and other scientific disciplines to specify when events occurred in the past. Because the "present" time changes, standard practice is to use 1 January 1950 as the commencement date of the age scale, reflecting the origin of practical radiocarbon dating in the 1950s
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Minoan Eruption
The Minoan eruption
Minoan eruption
of Thera, also referred to as the Thera eruption or Santorini
Santorini
eruption, was a major catastrophic volcanic eruption with a
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Santorini
Santorini
Santorini
(Greek: Σαντορίνη, pronounced [sandoˈrini]), classically Thera (English pronunciation /ˈθɪərə/), and officially Thira (Greek: Θήρα [ˈθira]), is an island in the southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km (120 mi) southeast of Greece's mainland. It is the largest island of a small, circular archipelago, which bears the same name and is the remnant of a volcanic caldera. It forms the southernmost member of the Cyclades group of islands, with an area of approximately 73 km2 (28 sq mi) and a 2011 census population of 15,550. The municipality of Santorini
Santorini
includes the inhabited islands of Santorini and Therasia
Therasia
and the uninhabited islands of Nea Kameni, Palaia Kameni, Aspronisi, and Christiana
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Nola-Croce Del Papa
Nola-Croce del Papa
Nola-Croce del Papa
was an early Bronze age
Bronze age
village discovered in May 2001 in the Campania
Campania
region near Nola, Italy.[1] The settlement has been described as the "first Pompeii" by archaeologists.[2]Contents1 Discovery 2 Findings 3 See also 4 ReferencesDiscovery[edit]The discovery of two bodies which had been caught by the Pyroclastic flow as they were fleeing a Volcanic eruption
Volcanic eruption
from Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
led archaeologists to find the lost settlement.[2] The eruption, which took place in the 2nd millennium BC, covered the village in volcanic ash
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Archaeologist
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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Hut (dwelling)
A hut is a primitive dwelling, which may be constructed of various local materials. Huts are a type of vernacular architecture because they are built of readily available materials such as wood, snow, ice, stone, grass, palm leaves, branches, hides, fabric, or mud using techniques passed down through the generations. A hut is a shape of a lower quality than a house (durable, well built dwelling) but higher quality than a shelter (place of refuge or safety) such as a tent and is used as temporary or seasonal shelter or in primitive societies as a permanent dwelling.[1] Huts exist in practically all nomadic cultures. Some huts are transportable and can stand most conditions of weather.Contents1 Word 2 Modern use 3 Types 4 Construction 5 Marketing usage 6 See also 7 ReferencesWord[edit] The term is often employed by people who consider non-primitive, but often the designs are based on traditions of local craftsmanship using sophisticated architectural techniques
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Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
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Footprint
Footprints are the impressions or images left behind by a person walking or running. Hoofprints and pawprints are those left by animals with hooves or paws rather than feet, while "shoeprints" is the specific term for prints made by shoes. They may either be indentations in the ground or something placed onto the surface that was stuck to the bottom of the foot. A "trackway" is set of footprints in soft earth left by a life-form; animal tracks are the footprints, hoofprints, or pawprints of an animal.Barefoot painted footprints from a child on a piece of paper.Footprints can be followed when tracking during a hunt or can provide evidence of activities. Some footprints remain unexplained, with several famous stories from mythology and legend
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Mount Vesuvius
25,000 years before present to 1944 age of volcano = c. 17,000 years to presentMountain type Somma-stratovolcanoVolcanic arc/belt Campanian volcanic arcLast eruption March 17–23, 1944ClimbingEasiest route Walk Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
( /vɪˈsuːviəs/; Italian: Monte Vesuvio [ˈmonte veˈzuːvjo]; Neapolitan: Vesuvio; Latin: Mons Vesuvius [mõːs wɛˈsʊwɪ.ʊs]; also Vesevus or Vesaevus in some Roman sources)[1] is a somma-stratovolcano located on the Gulf of Naples
Gulf of Naples
in Campania, Italy, about 9 km (5.6 mi) east of Naples
Naples
and a short distance from the shore. It is one of several volcanoes which form the Campanian volcanic arc
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Pompeii
Pompeii
Pompeii
was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples, in the Campania
Campania
region of Italy, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Pompeii, along with Herculaneum
Herculaneum
and many villas in the surrounding area, was mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius
Vesuvius
in AD 79. Archaeologists believe that the town was founded in the 7th or 6th century BC by the Osci
Osci
or Oscans. It came under the domination of Rome in the 4th century BC, and was conquered and became a Roman colony in 80 BC after it joined an unsuccessful rebellion against the Roman Republic
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Bibcode
The bibcode (also known as the refcode) is a compact identifier used by several astronomical data systems to uniquely specify literature references.Contents1 Adoption 2 Format 3 Examples 4 See also 5 ReferencesAdoption[edit] The Bibliographic Reference Code (refcode) was originally developed to be used in SIMBAD
SIMBAD
and the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database
NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database
(NED), but it became a de facto standard and is now used more widely, for example, by the NASA Astrophysics Data System
Astrophysics Data System
who coined and prefer the term "bibcode".[1][2] Format[edit] The code has a fixed length of 19 characters and has the form YYYYJJJJJVVVVMPPPPA where YYYY is the four-digit year of the reference and JJJJJ is a code indicating where the reference was published
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
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