HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Avaya
Avaya
Avaya
(/əˈvaɪ.ə/) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Santa Clara, California
Santa Clara, California
that specializes in business communications, specifically unified communications, contact center, and services.[4][5] It serves organizations at 220,000 customer locations worldwide.[6]. The company originated as a unit of Lucent
Lucent
Technologies, which was spun off from AT&T in 1995. Avaya
Avaya
was then spun off as its own company in 2000. It remained a public company from 2000 to 2007, when it was purchased by private equity firms. Avaya
Avaya
filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in January 2017. It emerged from Chapter 11 on December 15, 2017
[...More...]

"Avaya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
[...More...]

"List Of Business Entities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

U.S. Securities And Exchange Commission
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) is an independent agency of the United States federal government. The SEC holds primary responsibility for enforcing the federal securities laws, proposing securities rules, and regulating the securities industry, the nation's stock and options exchanges, and other activities and organizations, including the electronic securities markets in the United States.[2] In addition to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which created it, the SEC enforces the Securities Act of 1933, the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, the Investment
Investment
Company Act of 1940, the Investment
Investment
Advisers Act of 1940, the Sarbanes–Oxley Act
Sarbanes–Oxley Act
of 2002, and other statutes
[...More...]

"U.S. Securities And Exchange Commission" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Session Initiation Protocol
The Session Initiation Protocol
Session Initiation Protocol
(SIP) is a communications protocol for signaling and controlling multimedia communication sessions in applications of Internet telephony
Internet telephony
for voice and video calls, in private IP telephone systems, as well as in instant messaging over Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) networks. The protocol defines the specific format of messages exchanged and the sequence of communications for cooperation of the participants
[...More...]

"Session Initiation Protocol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
[...More...]

"Public Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Technological Convergence
This article describe science and technology convergence, with illustrations to convergence of emerging technologies (NBIC, nano-, bio-, info- and cognitive technologies) and convergence of media technology.This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (September 2007) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article may be too technical for most readers to understand. Please help improve it to make it understandable to non-experts, without removing the technical details
[...More...]

"Technological Convergence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Network Convergence
Network convergence
Network convergence
refers to the provision of telephone, video and data communication services within a single network. In other words, one company provides services for all forms of communication. Network convergence is primarily driven by development of technology and demand. Users are able to access a wider range of services, choose among more service providers
[...More...]

"Network Convergence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

2010 Winter Olympics
The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games (French: Les XXIes Jeux olympiques d'hiver) and commonly known as Vancouver
Vancouver
2010, informally the 21st Winter Olympics, was a major international multi-sport event held from 12 to 28 February 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, with some events held in the surrounding suburbs of Richmond, West Vancouver
Vancouver
and the University Endowment Lands, and in the nearby resort town of Whistler. Approximately 2,600 athletes from 82 nations participated in 86 events in fifteen disciplines. Both the Olympic and Paralympic Games
Paralympic Games
were organized by the Vancouver
Vancouver
Organizing Committee (VANOC), headed by John Furlong
[...More...]

"2010 Winter Olympics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

2010 Winter Paralympics
The 2010 Winter Paralympics, officially the X Paralympic Winter Games (French: Les Xes Jeux paralympiques d'hiver), or the tenth Winter Paralympics, were held in Vancouver
Vancouver
and Whistler, Canada
Canada
from March 12 to 21, 2010. The Opening Ceremony took place in BC Place
BC Place
Stadium in Vancouver
Vancouver
and the Closing Ceremony in Whistler. With a theme of "One Inspires Many," the Opening Ceremony featured over 5000 local performers. Fifteen-year-old snowboarder Zach Beaumont, who is an amputee, was the final torch bearer and lit the Games Cauldron
[...More...]

"2010 Winter Paralympics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Initial Public Offering
Initial public offering
Initial public offering
(IPO) or stock market launch is a type of public offering in which shares of a company are sold to institutional investors[1] and usually also retail (individual) investors; an IPO is underwritten by one or more investment banks, who also arrange for the shares to be listed on one or more stock exchange. Through this process, colloquially known as floating, or going public, a privately held company is transformed into a public company. Initial public offerings can be used: to raise new equity capital for the company concerned; to monetize the investments of private shareholders such as company founders or private equity investors; and to enable easy trading of existing holdings or future capital raising by becoming publicly traded enterprises. After the IPO, those shares which trade freely in the open market are known as the free float
[...More...]

"Initial Public Offering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Voice Over IP
Voice over Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(also voice over IP, VoIP or IP telephony) is a methodology and group of technologies for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over Internet
Internet
Protocol (IP) networks, such as the Internet. The terms Internet
Internet
telephony, broadband telephony, and broadband phone service specifically refer to the provisioning of communications services (voice, fax, SMS, voice-messaging) over the public Internet, rather than via the public switched telephone network (PSTN). The steps and principles involved in originating VoIP telephone calls are similar to traditional digital telephony and involve signaling, channel setup, digitization of the analog voice signals, and encoding. Instead of being transmitted over a circuit-switched network, the digital information is packetized, and transmission occurs as IP packets over a packet-switched network
[...More...]

"Voice Over IP" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Session Border Controller
A session border controller (SBC) is a device regularly deployed in Voice over Internet Protocol
Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP) networks to exert control over the signaling and usually also the media streams involved in setting up, conducting, and tearing down telephone calls or other interactive media communications. Early deployments of SBCs were focused on the borders between two service provider networks in a peering environment. This role has now expanded to include significant deployments between a service provider's access network and a backbone network to provide service to residential and/or enterprise customers.[1] The term "session" refers to a communication between two parties – in the context of telephony, this would be a call
[...More...]

"Session Border Controller" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Earnings Call
An earnings call is a teleconference, or webcast, in which a public company discusses the financial results of a reporting period. The name comes from earnings per share (EPS), the bottom line number in the income statement divided by the number of shares outstanding. The US-based National Investor Relations Institute (NIRI) says that 92% of companies represented by their members conduct earnings calls and that virtually all of these are webcast.[citation needed] Transcripts of calls may be made available either by the company or a third party. The calls are usually preceded or accompanied by a press release containing a summary of the financial results, and possibly by a more detailed filing under securities law
[...More...]

"Earnings Call" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Group, Inc. is an American multinational investment bank and financial services company headquartered in New York City. Apart from investment banking, it offers services in investment management, securities, asset management, prime brokerage, and securities underwriting. As a "Bulge Bracket Bank", it is one of the largest investment banking enterprises in the world.[4][5] It is considered a primary dealer in the United States Treasury security
United States Treasury security
market and more generally, a prominent market maker. The bank owns a direct bank known as GS Bank USA through which it maintenues its online banking presence
[...More...]

"Goldman Sachs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chapter 11, Title 11, United States Code
Chapter 11 is a chapter of Title 11 of the United States
United States
Bankruptcy Code, which permits reorganization under the bankruptcy laws of the United States
[...More...]

"Chapter 11, Title 11, United States Code" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Users' Group
A users' group (also user's group or user group) is a type of club focused on the use of a particular technology, usually (but not always) computer-related. Users' groups started in the early days of mainframe computers, as a way to share sometimes hard-won knowledge and useful software, usually written by end users independently of the vendor-supplied programming efforts. SHARE, a user group originated by aerospace industry corporate users of IBM
IBM
mainframe computers, was founded in 1955 and is the oldest computer user group still active. DECUS, the DEC User's Society, was founded in 1961 and its descendant organization, Connect Worldwide, still operates. The Computer
Computer
Measurement Group (CMG) was founded in 1974 by systems professionals with a common interest in (mainframe) capacity management, and continues today with a much broader mission
[...More...]

"Users' Group" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.