HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Avalon Project
The Avalon Project is a digital library of documents relating to law, history and diplomacy. The project is part of the Yale Law
Law
School Lillian Goldman Law
Law
Library. The project contains online electronic copies of documents dating back to the beginning of history, making it possible to study the original text of not only very famous documents such as the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and the United States Bill of Rights, but also the text of less well known but significant documents which mark turning points in the history of law and rights.[1]The Avalon Project will mount digital documents relevant to the fields of Law, History, Economics, Politics, Diplomacy
Diplomacy
and Government
[...More...]

"Avalon Project" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Digital Library
A digital library, or digital collection, is an online database of digital objects that can include text, still images, audio, video, or other digital media formats. Objects can consist of digitized content like print or photographs, as well as born-digital content like word processor files or social media posts. In addition to storing content, digital libraries provide means for organizing, searching, and retrieving the content contained in the collection. Digital libraries can vary immensely in size and scope, and can be maintained by individuals or organizations.[1] The digital content may be stored locally, or accessed remotely via computer networks
[...More...]

"Digital Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Law
Law
Law
is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.[2] Law
Law
is a system that regulates and ensures that individuals or a community adhere to the will of the state. State-enforced laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or established by judges through precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals can create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that may elect to accept alternative arbitration to the normal court process. The formation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein
[...More...]

"Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
[...More...]

"History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Diplomacy
Diplomacy
Diplomacy
is the art and practice of conducting negotiations between representatives of states. It usually refers to international diplomacy, the conduct of international relations[2] through the intercession of professional diplomats with regard to a full range of topical issues. International treaties are usually negotiated by diplomats prior to endorsement by national politicians
[...More...]

"Diplomacy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Yale Law School
Yale Law School
Yale Law School
(often referred to as Yale Law or YLS) is the law school of Yale University, located in New Haven, Connecticut, United States. Established in 1824, Yale Law offers the J.D., LL.M., J.S.D., M.S.L., and Ph.D. degrees in law. The school's small size and prestige make its admissions process the most selective of any law school in the United States.[4][5] Whereas less than 1 in 10 applicants are offered admission, roughly 8 in 10 admits ultimately matriculate,[6] which marks the best yield rate among the top U.S. law schools.[5][7] Yale Law has been ranked the number one law school in the country by U.S. News and World Report
U.S

[...More...]

"Yale Law School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lillian Goldman Law Library
The Lillian Goldman Law Library
Lillian Goldman Law Library
in Memory of Sol Goldman, commonly known as the Yale Law Library, is the law library of Yale Law School. It is located in the Sterling Law Building
Sterling Law Building
and has almost 800,000 volumes of print materials and about 10,000 active serial titles, in which there are 200,000 volumes of foreign and international law materials. The library was named after a USD $20 million donation made by Lillian Goldman, widow of real estate magnate Sol Goldman.[1] It is also well known as the place where Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
and Hillary Rodham met for the first time.[2][3][4] Facilities[edit] The library is contained within five stories on the eastern wing of the Sterling Law Building, completed in 1931 and designed by James Gamble Rodgers. The library's main reading room, named for the Class of 1964, is located on the library's third story
[...More...]

"Lillian Goldman Law Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Magna Carta
Magna Carta
Magna Carta
Libertatum ( Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
for "the Great Charter
Charter
of the Liberties"), commonly called Magna Carta
Magna Carta
(also Magna Charta; "Great Charter"),[a] is a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.[b] First drafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
to make peace between the unpopular King and a group of rebel barons, it promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown, to be implemented through a council of 25 barons. Neither side stood behind their commitments, and the charter was annulled by Pope Innocent III, leading to the First Barons' War
[...More...]

"Magna Carta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

English Bill Of Rights
The Bill of Rights, also known as the English Bill of Rights, is an Act of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
that deals with constitutional matters and sets out certain basic civil rights. It received the Royal Assent on 16 December 1689 and is a restatement in statutory form of the Declaration of Right presented by the Convention Parliament to William III and Mary II in February 1689, inviting them to become joint sovereigns of England. The Bill of Rights lays down limits on the powers of the monarch and sets out the rights of Parliament, including the requirement for regular parliaments, free elections, and freedom of speech in Parliament. It sets out certain rights of individuals including the prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment and reestablished the right of Protestants to have arms for their defence within the rule of law
[...More...]

"English Bill Of Rights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States Bill Of Rights
The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.[1] Proposed following the often bitter 1787–88 battle over ratification of the U.S. Constitution, and crafted to address the objections raised by Anti-Federalists, the Bill of Rights amendments add to the Constitution specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights, clear limitations on the government's power in judicial and other proceedings, and explicit declarations that all powers not specifically delegated to Congress by the Constitution are reserved for the states or the people
[...More...]

"United States Bill Of Rights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Human Rights
Human rights
Human rights
are moral principles or norms[1] that describe certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in municipal and international law.[2] They are commonly understood as inalienable[3] fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being",[4] and which are "inherent in all human beings"[5] regardless of their nation, location, language, religion, ethnic origin or any other status.[3] They are applicable everywhere and at every time in the sense of being universal,[1] and they are egalita
[...More...]

"Human Rights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

George Mason University
George Mason
George Mason
University (GMU, Mason, or George Mason) is a public research university in Fairfax County, Virginia.[9] Initially founded as a branch of the University of Virginia
Virginia
in 1949, it became an independent institution in 1972.[1]:1 The university is named after the founding father, George Mason, a Virginia
Virginia
planter and politician who authored the Virginia
Virginia
Declaration of Rights. Mason currently operates four campuses located in Virginia, the main campus being in Fairfax, with another in Songdo, South Korea
South Korea
inside the Incheon Free Economic Zone. Three of the four campuses in Virginia
Virginia
are within the Northern Virginia
Virginia
region of the commonwealth, part of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area
[...More...]

"George Mason University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Avalon Project
The Avalon Project is a digital library of documents relating to law, history and diplomacy. The project is part of the Yale Law
Law
School Lillian Goldman Law
Law
Library. The project contains online electronic copies of documents dating back to the beginning of history, making it possible to study the original text of not only very famous documents such as the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and the United States Bill of Rights, but also the text of less well known but significant documents which mark turning points in the history of law and rights.[1]The Avalon Project will mount digital documents relevant to the fields of Law, History, Economics, Politics, Diplomacy
Diplomacy
and Government
[...More...]

"Avalon Project" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.