HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Author Fees
An article processing charge (APC), also known as a publication fee, is a fee which is sometimes charged to authors to make a work available open access in either an open access journal or hybrid journal.[1][2][3] This fee is usually paid by an author's institution or research funder rather than by the author themselves.[4] Some publishers waive the fee in cases of hardship.[5] An article processing charge does not guarantee that the author retains copyright to the work, or that it will be made available under a Creative Commons license.[citation needed] Journals use a variety of ways to generate the income required to cover publishing costs (including editorial costs, any costs of administering the peer review system), such as subsidies from institutions[6] and subscriptions
[...More...]

"Author Fees" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open Access
Open access
Open access
(OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g
[...More...]

"Open Access" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Commons
(CC) is an American non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share.[2] The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons
Commons
licenses free of charge to the public. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. An easy-to-understand one-page explanation of rights, with associated visual symbols, explains the specifics of each Creative Commons
Commons
license. Creative Commons
Commons
licenses do not replace copyright, but are based upon it
[...More...]

"Creative Commons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Berlin Declaration On Open Access To Knowledge In The Sciences And Humanities
The Berlin
Berlin
Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities is a major international statement on open access and access to knowledge. It emerged from a conference on open access hosted in the Harnack House
Harnack House
in Berlin
Berlin
by the Max Planck Society
Max Planck Society
in 2003.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Statement 3 Signatories 4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBackground[edit] Following the Budapest Open Access Initiative
Budapest Open Access Initiative
in 2002 and the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing in 2003, the Berlin
Berlin
Declaration was a third influential event in the establishment of the open access movement
[...More...]

"Berlin Declaration On Open Access To Knowledge In The Sciences And Humanities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Bethesda Statement On Open Access Publishing
The Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing is a 2003 statement which defines the concept of open access and then supports that concept.Contents1 The statement 2 Significance 3 References 4 External linksThe statement[edit] On 11 April 2003, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute
[...More...]

"Bethesda Statement On Open Access Publishing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Durham Statement On Open Access To Legal Scholarship
The Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship is a public statement related to ensuring the open access of legal information and scholarship. It was written in 2008 by a group of library directors from law schools in the United States. Background and development[edit] In 2007, Richard Danner presented two different papers arguing that John Willinsky's open access principles were also applicable to legal scholarship and information. He also presented information on the work Duke University School of Law
Duke University School of Law
had done to improve electronic access to journals and faculty scholarship.[1] In October 2008, Danner met with library directors from 11 other law schools at Duke's campus in Durham, North Carolina
Durham, North Carolina
to discuss the topic
[...More...]

"Durham Statement On Open Access To Legal Scholarship" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

NIH Public Access Policy
The NIH Public Access Policy
NIH Public Access Policy
is an open access mandate, drafted in 2004 and mandated in 2008,[1] requiring that research papers describing research funded by the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
must be available to the public free through PubMed Central within 12 months of publication
[...More...]

"NIH Public Access Policy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Research Works Act
The Research Works Act, 102 H.R. 3699, was a bill that was introduced in the United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
at the 112th United States Congress on December 16, 2011, by Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA) and co-sponsored by Carolyn B. Maloney
Carolyn B

[...More...]

"Research Works Act" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Self-archiving
Self-archiving is the act of (the author's) depositing a free copy of an electronic document online in order to provide open access to it.[1] The term usually refers to the self-archiving of peer-reviewed research journal and conference articles, as well as theses and book chapters, deposited in the author's own institutional repository or open archive for the purpose of maximizing its accessibility, usage and citation impact
[...More...]

"Self-archiving" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open-access Policy
An open-access mandate is a policy adopted by a research institution, research funder, or government which requires researchers—usually university faculty or research staff and/or research grant recipients—to make their published, peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers open access (1) by self-archiving their final, peer-reviewed drafts in a freely accessible institutional repository or disciplinary repository ("Green OA") or (2) by publishing them in an open-access journal ("Gold OA")[1][2][3][4] or both.Contents1 Characteristics1.1 Institutional and funder mandates 1.2 Principal kinds of open-access mandates 1.3 Locus of deposit 1.4 Timing of deposit 1.5 Timing of opening access to deposit2 Instances2.1 Canadian funding agencies 2.2 United States funding agencies 2.3 European funding agencies3 Effectiveness3.1 Tracking mandates4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Among t
[...More...]

"Open-access Policy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open-access Mandate
An open-access mandate is a policy adopted by a research institution, research funder, or government which requires researchers—usually university faculty or research staff and/or research grant recipients—to make their published, peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers open access (1) by self-archiving their final, peer-reviewed drafts in a freely accessible institutional repository or disciplinary repository ("Green OA") or (2) by publishing them in an open-access journal ("Gold OA")[1][2][3][4] or both.Contents1 Characteristics1.1 Institutional and funder mandates 1.2 Principal kinds of open-access mandates 1.3 Locus of deposit 1.4 Timing of deposit 1.5 Timing of opening access to deposit2 Instances2.1 Canadian funding agencies 2.2 United States funding agencies 2.3 European funding agencies3 Effectiveness3.1 Tracking mandates4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Among t
[...More...]

"Open-access Mandate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Open Access Repository
An open access repository or open archive is a digital platform that holds research output and provides free, immediate and permanent access to research results for anyone to use, download and distribute. To facilitate open access such repositories must be interoperable according to the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH). Search engines
Search engines
harvest the content of open access repositories, constructing a database of worldwide, free of charge available research.[1] As opposed to a simple institutional repository or disciplinary repository, open access repositories provide free access to research for users outside the institutional community and are one of the recommended ways to achieve the open access vision described in the Budapest Open Access Initiative
Budapest Open Access Initiative
definition of open access
[...More...]

"Open Access Repository" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Delayed Open Access Journal
Delayed open access journals are traditional subscription-based journals that provide free online access upon the expiry of an embargo period following the initial publication date.Contents1 Details 2 Adoption 3 See also 4 ReferencesDetails[edit]This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The embargo period before an article is made available for free can vary from a few months to two or more years. In a 2013 study, 77.8% of delayed open access journals analyzed had an embargo of 12 months or less. 85.4% had an embargo period of 24 months or less.[1][2] A journal subscription or an individual article purchase fee would be required to access the materials before this embargo period ends
[...More...]

"Delayed Open Access Journal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Directory Of Open Access Journals
The Directory of Open Access Journals
Directory of Open Access Journals
(DOAJ) is a website that lists open access journals and is maintained by Infrastructure Services for Open Access (IS4OA).[2] The project defines open access journals as scientific and scholarly journals that meet high quality standards by exercising peer review or editorial quality control and "use a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access".[3] The Budapest Open Access Initiative's definition of open access is used to define required rights given to users, for the journal to be included in t
[...More...]

"Directory Of Open Access Journals" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Predatory Open Access Publishing
Predatory open-access publishing is an exploitative open-access academic publishing business model that involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not). The idea that they are "predatory" is based on the view that academics are tricked into publishing with them, though some authors may be aware that the journal is poor quality or even fraudulent.[a] New scholars from developing countries are said to be especially at risk of being mislead by predatory practices.[2][3] "Beall's List", a report that was regularly updated by Jeffrey Beall of the University of Colorado
University of Colorado
until January 2017, set forth criteria for categorizing publications as predatory.[4] The list was taken offline by the author in January 2017.[5][b] A demand by Frontiers Media to open a misconduct case against Beall was reported as the reason Beall closed the list
[...More...]

"Predatory Open Access Publishing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association
The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association
Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association
(OASPA) is a non-profit trade association representing the interests of open access journal publishers globally in all scientific, technical and scholarly disciplines. Along with promoting open access publishers (particularly open access journals), OASPA sets best practices and provides a forum for the exchange of information on and experiences of open access. OASPA brings together the major open access publishers on the one hand and independent—often society-based or university-based—publishers on the other, along with some hybrid open access publishers
[...More...]

"Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.