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Australian Science Fiction
Australia, unlike Europe, does not have a long history in the genre of science fiction. Nevil Shute's On the Beach, published in 1957, and filmed in 1959, was perhaps the first notable international success. Though not born in Australia, Shute spent his latter years there, and the book was set in Australia. It might have been worse had the imports of American pulp magazines not been restricted during WWII, forcing local writers into the field. Various compilation magazines began appearing in the 1960s and the field has continued to expand into some significance. Today Australia
Australia
has a thriving SF/Fantasy genre with names recognised around the world
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On The Beach (novel)
On the Beach is a 1957 post-apocalyptic novel written by British-Australian author Nevil Shute after he emigrated to Australia. The novel details the experiences of a mixed group of people in Melbourne as they await the arrival of deadly radiation spreading towards them from the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war a year previously. As the radiation approaches, each person deals with impending death differently.[2][3] Shute's initial story appeared as a four-part series, The Last Days on Earth, in the London weekly periodical Sunday Graphic in April 1957. For the novel, Shute expanded on the storyline.[4] The story has been adapted twice as a film (in 1959 and 2000) and once as a BBC radio broadcast in 2008.Contents1 Title 2 Plot 3 Characterization 4 Reception 5 Adaptations 6 References 7 External linksTitle[edit] The phrase "on the beach" is a Royal Navy term that means "retired from the Service."[5] The title also refers to the T. S
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Horror Fiction
Horror is a genre of fiction which is intended to, or has the capacity to frighten, scare, disgust, or startle its readers or viewers by inducing feelings of horror and terror. Literary historian J. A. Cuddon has defined the horror story as "a piece of fiction in prose of variable length... which shocks or even frightens the reader, or perhaps induces a feeling of repulsion or loathing".[1] It creates an eerie and frightening atmosphere. Horror is frequently supernatural, though it can be non-supernatural
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Fantasy
Fantasy
Fantasy
is a genre of fiction set in a fictional universe, often without any locations, events, or people referencing the real world. Its roots are in oral traditions, which then became literature and drama. From the twentieth century it has expanded further into various media, including film, television, graphic novels and video games. Fantasy
Fantasy
is a subgenre of speculative fiction and is distinguished from the genres of science fiction and horror by the absence of scientific or macabre themes respectively, though these genres overlap. In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form
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David G. Hartwell
David Geddes Hartwell (July 10, 1941 – January 20, 2016) was an American critic, publisher, and editor of thousands of science fiction and fantasy novels. He was best known for work with Signet, Pocket, and Tor Books
Tor Books
publishers. He was also noted as an award-winning editor of anthologies. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
describes him as "perhaps the single most influential book editor of the past forty years in the American [science fiction] publishing world".[1]Contents1 Early years 2 Career 3 Awards and other achievements 4 Personal life 5 Works5.1 Books as writer 5.2 Magazines edited 5.3 Standalone anthologies 5.4 Anthology series6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly years[edit] Hartwell was born in Salem, Massachusetts, and attended Williams College, where he graduated with a BA in 1963
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Jonathan Strahan
Jonathan Strahan
Jonathan Strahan
(born 1964 in Belfast, Northern Ireland) is an editor and publisher of science fiction. His family moved to Perth, Western Australia in 1968, and he graduated from the University of Western Australia with a Bachelor of Arts in 1986. In 1990 he co-founded Eidolon: The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy, and worked on it as co-editor and co-publisher until 1999. He was also co-publisher of Eidolon Books which published Robin Pen's The Secret Life of Rubber-Suit Monsters, Howard Waldrop's Going Home Again, Storm Constantine's The Thorn Boy, and Terry Dowling's Blackwater Days. In 1997 Jonathan worked in Oakland, California for Locus: The Newspaper of the Science Fiction Field as an assistant editor and wrote a regular reviewer column for the magazine until March 1998 when he returned to Australia
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Terror Australis
Terror Australis: the Australian Horror and Fantasy Magazine (1988-1992) was Australia's first mass market horror magazine. It succeeded the Australian Horror and Fantasy Magazine (1984–87) edited by Barry Radburn (who has gone on to publish novels as B. Michael Radburn) and Stephen Studach. AH&FM was the first semi-professional magazine of its kind in Australia to pay authors. After working on the production crew of AH&FM, when Radburn eventually suspended publication, Leigh Blackmore took over the subscription base and with co-editors Chris G.C
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Tasmania
Tasmania
Tasmania
(/tæzˈmeɪniə/;[11] abbreviated as Tas and known colloquially as Tassie) is an island state of Australia. It is located 240 km (150 mi) to the south of the Australian mainland, separated by the Bass Strait
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Peter Nicholls (writer)
Peter Douglas Nicholls (8 March 1939 – 6 March 2018)[1] was an Australian literary scholar and critic. He was the creator and a co-editor of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
with John Clute.[2]Contents1 Early career 2 The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction 3 Other work 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly career[edit] Born in Melbourne, Victoria, he spent two decades (from 1968 to 1988) as an expatriate, first in the US, and then the UK.[3] Nicholls' early career was as a literary academic, originally with the University of Melbourne
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John Clute
John Frederick Clute (born 12 September 1940)[1] is a Canadian-born author and critic specializing in science fiction (also SF, sf) and fantasy literature who has lived in both England
England
and the United States since 1969. He has been described as "an integral part of science fiction's history"[2] and "perhaps the foremost reader-critic of sf in our time, and one of the best the genre has ever known."[3] He was one of eight people who founded the English magazine Interzone in 1982[2] (the others including Malcolm Edwards, Colin Greenland, Roz Kaveney, and David Pringle). Clute's articles on speculative fiction have appeared in various publications since the 1960s. He is a co-editor of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (with Peter Nicholls) and of The Encyclopedia of Fantasy (with John Grant), as well as writing The Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Science Fiction, all of which won Hugo Awards for Best Non-Fiction
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On The Beach (1959 Film)
On the Beach is a 1959 American post-apocalyptic science fiction drama film from United Artists, produced and directed by Stanley Kramer, that stars Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner, Fred Astaire, and Anthony Perkins.[2] This black-and-white film is based on Nevil Shute's 1957 novel of the same name depicting the aftermath of a nuclear war.[3] Unlike the novel, no blame is placed on whoever started the war; it is hinted in the film that the threat of annihilation may have arisen from an accident or misjudgment.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production3.1 Differences between the novel and film4 Release and reception4.1 Awards5 Remake 6 Documentary 7 See also 8 References8.1 Notes 8.2 Citations 8.3 Bibliography9 External linksPlot[edit] In early 1964, in the months following World War III, the conflict has devastated the Northern Hemisphere, polluting the atmosphere with nuclear fallout, killing all life there
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The Encyclopedia Of Science Fiction
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
is an English language reference work on science fiction, first published in 1979. In October 2011, the third edition was made available for free online.[1]Contents1 Publication history 2 Contents 3 Bibliography 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPublication history[edit]Malcolm Edwards, John Clute
John Clute
and Peter Nicholls discussing the early days of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
at Loncon 3, Worldcon 2014.The first edition, edited by Peter Nicholls with John Clute,[2] was published by Granada in 1979
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Melbourne
Melbourne
Melbourne
(/ˈmɛlbərn/[8] locally [ˈmɛɫbn̩] ( listen))[9][10] is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian
Australian
state of Victoria, and the second-most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[1] The name "Melbourne" covers an urban agglomeration spanning 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi),[2] which comprises the broader metropolitan area, as well as being the common name for its city centre
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33rd World Science Fiction Convention
The 33rd World Science Fiction Convention, called Aussiecon, was held in Melbourne, Australia, August 14–17, 1975, at the Southern Cross Hotel. The guests of honour were Ursula K. Le Guin (pro), Susan Wood (fan), Mike Glicksohn (fan), and Donald Tuck (Australian). Aussiecon was significant in the development of cohesive Australian activity around science fiction and fantasy fandom. The chairman was Robin Johnson. The toastmaster was John Bangsund. Total attendance was 606.Contents1 Awards1.1 Hugo Awards 1.2 Other awards2 See also 3 References 4 External linksAwards[edit] The Hugo Awards, named after Hugo Gernsback, are presented every year for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. Results are based on the ballots submitted by members of the World Science Fiction Society. Other awards, including the John W
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