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Aurora Peak (Washington)
Aurora Peak is a summit in Olympic National Park
Olympic National Park
in Clallam County, Washington. It is the highest point on Aurora Ridge. The northern flank of the ridge forms a steep escarpment above Lake Crescent, while the southern flank towers above the Sol Duc River. Other summits on the ridge are Sourdough Mountain and Lizard Head Peak. To the east the ridge is known as Happy Lake Ridge. The Aurora Ridge Trail follows along the ridge line providing scenic views. The 15.1 miles (24.3 km) trail, rated moderate to difficult, changes in elevation from 1,300 to 4,800 feet (400 to 1,460 m). The Park Service notes that "some sections of this trail are difficult to follow.".[3] References[edit]^ a b "Aurora Peak, Washington". Peakbagger.com.  ^ "Aurora Peak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.  ^ "Aurora Ridge Trail". National Park Service
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Topographic Map
In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Sol Duc River
The Sol Duc River
River
(also spelled Soleduck) is a river in the U.S. state of Washington. About 78 miles (126 km) long, it flows west through the northwest part of the Olympic Peninsula, from the Olympic Mountains of Olympic National Park
Olympic National Park
and Olympic National Forest, then through the broad Sol Duc Valley. Near the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
the Sol Duc River
River
joins the Bogachiel River, forming the Quillayute River, which flows about 4 miles (6.4 km) to the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
at La Push. Although the Quillayute River
Quillayute River
is short, its large tributary rivers—the Sol Duc, Bogachiel, Calawah, and Dickey Rivers—drain the largest watershed of the northern Olympic Peninsula, 629 square miles (1,630 km2)
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Lake Crescent
Lake
Lake
Crescent is a deep lake located entirely within Olympic National Park in Clallam County, Washington, United States, approximately 17 miles (27 km) west of Port Angeles, Washington
Port Angeles, Washington
on U.S. Route 101 and nearby to the small community of Piedmont. At an official maximum depth of 624 feet (190 m), also the maximum depth of the depth sounder used to find that depth (see depth section), it is officially the second deepest lake in Washington. Unofficial depth measurements of more than 1,000 feet (300 m) have been rumored in the region for years, although this figure has recently been proven false after a lake-wide bathymetric survey was performed from 2013 to 2014 by Eian Ray and Jeff Enge. The results of this survey showed the maximum depth as being 596 feet
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United States Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[2] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
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Olympic Mountains
The Olympic Mountains
Olympic Mountains
are a mountain range on the Olympic Peninsula
Olympic Peninsula
of western Washington in the United States. The mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are not especially high – Mount Olympus is the highest at 7,962 ft (2,427 m); however, the eastern slopes rise out of Puget Sound
Puget Sound
from sea level and the western slopes are separated from the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
by the low-lying 20 to 35 km (12 to 22 mi) wide Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
coastal plain. The western slopes are the wettest place in the 48 contiguous states. Most of the mountains are protected within the bounds of the Olympic National Park. The mountains are spread out across four counties: Clallam, Grays Harbor, Jefferson and Mason
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North American Vertical Datum Of 1988
The North American Vertical Datum of 1988
North American Vertical Datum of 1988
(NAVD 88) is the vertical control datum of orthometric height established for vertical control surveying in the United States
United States
of America based upon the General Adjustment of the North American Datum of 1988. NAVD 88 was established in 1991 by the minimum-constraint adjustment of geodetic leveling observations in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. It held fixed the height of the primary tidal bench mark, referenced to the International Great Lakes Datum of 1985 local mean sea level height value, at Rimouski, Quebec, Canada
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Mountain Range
A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny.[1] Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys. Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
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Washington (U.S. State)
Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/ ( listen)), officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. Named after George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in the settlement of the Oregon
Oregon
boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, which is often shortened to Washington. Washington is the 18th largest state with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 km2), and the 13th most populous state with over 7.4 million people
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Clallam County, Washington
Clallam County is a county in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,404.[1] The county seat and largest city is Port Angeles.[2] The name is a Klallam
Klallam
word for "the strong people". The county was formed on April 26, 1854.[3] Located on the Olympic Peninsula, it is south from the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which forms the Canada–US border, as British Columbia's Vancouver Island is across the strait. Clallam County comprises the Port Angeles, WA Micropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 Geography1.1 Geographic features 1.2 Adjacent counties 1.3 National protected areas2 Demographics2.1 2000 census 2.2 2010 census3 Politics 4 Transportation4.1 Major highways 4.2 Airports5 Communities5.1 Cities 5.2 Census-designated places 5.3 Other communities6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksGeography[edit] According to the U.S
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Olympic National Park
Olympic National Park
Olympic National Park
is located in the state of Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula.[3] The park has four basic regions: the Pacific coastline, alpine areas, the west side temperate rainforest and the forests of the drier east side.[4] Within the park there are three distinct ecosystems which are sub-alpine forest and wildflower meadow, temperate forest, and the rugged Pacific Shore. These three different ecosystems are in pristine condition and have outstanding scenery.[5] U.S. President
U.S. President
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
originally created Mount Olympus National Monument on 2 March 1909.[6][7] It was designated a national park by President Franklin Roosevelt
Franklin Roosevelt
on June 29, 1938
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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