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Augustus Wollaston Franks
Sir Augustus Wollaston Franks
Augustus Wollaston Franks
KCB (20 March 1826 – 21 May 1897) was an English antiquary and museum administrator. Franks was described by Marjorie Caygill, historian of the British Museum, as "arguably the most important collector in the history of the British Museum, and one of the greatest collectors of his age".[1]Contents1 Early life 2 At the British Museum2.1 Administrator 2.2 Acquisitions 2.3 Personal collecting3 Death and legacy 4 Works 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Born at Geneva, he was elder son of Captain Frederick Franks, R.N., and of Frederica Anne, daughter of Sir John Saunders Sebright. His godfather was William Hyde Wollaston, a friend of his mother. His early years were spent mainly in Rome and Geneva
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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John Warren, 3rd Baron De Tabley
John Byrne Leicester Warren, 3rd Baron de Tabley
Baron de Tabley
(26 April 1835 – 22 November 1895) was an English poet, numismatist, botanist and an authority on bookplates.Portrait of Lord de Tabley, (48 x 40 inches), by John Hanson Walker (1844–1933)Contents1 Biography 2 A poem 3 Sisters 4 Two of de Tabley's sisters, a niece and an uncle 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit]Lord de Tabley's bookplate, engraved by Charles William SherbornHe was eldest son of George Fleming Leicester (afterwards Warren), Lord de Tabley (1811–1887), by his wife (married: 1832) Catherina Barbara (1814–1869), second daughter of Jerome, Count de Salis-Soglio. The young Warren, as he then was, was educated at Eton from 1847 to 1851, in the Rev. Edward Coleridge's house, and then at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1856 with second class honours in classics, law, and modern history
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William Burges
William Burges
William Burges
ARA (/ˈbərdʒɛs/; 2 December 1827 – 20 April 1881) was an English architect and designer. Among the greatest of the Victorian art-architects, he sought in his work to escape from both nineteenth-century industrialisation and the Neoclassical architectural style and re-establish the architectural and social values of a utopian medieval England. Burges stands within the tradition of the Gothic Revival, his works echoing those of the Pre-Raphaelites and heralding those of the Arts and Crafts movement. Burges's career was short but illustrious; he won his first major commission for Saint Fin Barre's Cathedral
Saint Fin Barre's Cathedral
in Cork in 1863, when he was 35, and he died, in 1881, at his Kensington
Kensington
home, The Tower House, aged only 53. His architectural output was small but varied
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Octavius Morgan
Charles Octavius Swinnerton Morgan DL, JP, FRS, FSA (15 September 1803 – 5 August 1888), known as Octavius Morgan, was a British politician, historian and antiquary. He was a significant benefactor to the British Museum.[1]Contents1 Background and education 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksBackground and education[edit] Morgan was born on 15 September 1803. He was the fourth son of Sir Charles Morgan, 2nd Baronet, of Tredegar Park, Monmouthshire, by his wife Mary (née Stoney). Charles Rodney Morgan and Charles Morgan, 1st Baron Tredegar, were his elder brothers. He was educated at Westminster School
Westminster School
in London and at Christ Church, Oxford, gaining an M.A. in 1832. Career[edit] Morgan was a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, a Fellow of the Royal Society
Royal Society
and the President of the Royal Archaeological Institute
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Alexander Cunningham
Sir Alexander Cunningham
Alexander Cunningham
KCIE CSI (23 January 1814 – 28 November 1893) was a British army engineer with the Bengal Engineer Group
Bengal Engineer Group
who later took an interest in the history and archaeology of India. In 1861 he was appointed to the newly created position of archaeological surveyor to the government of India; and he founded and organised what later became the Archaeological Survey of India. He wrote numerous books and monographs and made extensive collections of artefacts
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Bethnal Green Museum
The V&A Museum of Childhood in Bethnal Green
Bethnal Green
in the East End of London
London
is a branch of the Victoria and Albert Museum
Victoria and Albert Museum
(the "V&A"), which is the United Kingdom's national museum of applied arts.Contents1 History 2 Transport connections 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]The official opening of the Bethnal Green
Bethnal Green
Museum by the Prince of Wales in 1872.The museum was founded in 1872 as the Bethnal Green
Bethnal Green
Museum. The iron structure reused a prefabricated building from Albertopolis
Albertopolis
which was replaced with some early sections of the modern V&A complex
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Netsuke
Netsuke
Netsuke
(根付) [netsɯke] are miniature sculptures that were invented in 17th-century Japan
Japan
to serve a practical function (the two Japanese characters ne+tsuke mean "root" and "to attach"). In English the word may be italicized or not, with American English
American English
tending to favour the former and British English
British English
the latter.[1][2] Traditional Japanese garments—robes called kosode and kimono—had no pockets; however, men who wore them needed a place to store their personal belongings, such as pipes, tobacco, money, seals, or medicines. Their solution was to place such objects in containers (called sagemono) hung by cords from the robes' sashes (obi). The containers may have been pouches or small woven baskets, but the most popular were beautifully crafted boxes (inrō), which were held shut by ojime, which were sliding beads on cords
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Tsuba
Japanese sword
Japanese sword
mountings are the various housings and associated fittings (tosogu)[1] that hold the blade of a Japanese sword
Japanese sword
when it is being worn or stored. Koshirae
Koshirae
(拵え) refers to the ornate mountings of a Japanese sword
Japanese sword
(e.g. katana) used when the sword blade is being worn by its owner, whereas the shirasaya is a plain undecorated wooden mounting composed of a saya and tsuka that the sword blade is stored in when not being used.Two antique koshirae, katana (top), wakizashi (middle), in the form of a daisho (matched set)
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Finger Ring
A ring is a round band, usually of metal, worn as an ornamental piece of jewellery around the finger, or sometimes the toe; it is the most common current meaning of the word "ring". Strictly speaking a normal ring is a finger ring (which may be hyphenated); other types of rings worn as ornaments are earrings, bracelets for the wrist, armlets or arm rings, toe rings and torc or neck rings, but except perhaps for toe rings, the plain term "ring" is not normally used to refer to these. Rings are most often made of metal but can be of almost any material: metal, plastic, stone, wood, bone, glass, or gemstone
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Drinking Vessel
This list of glassware[1] includes drinking vessels (drinkware) and tableware used to set a table for eating a meal, general glass items such as vases, and glasses used in the catering industry
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Playing-cards
A playing card is a piece of specially prepared heavy paper, thin cardboard, plastic-coated paper, cotton-paper blend, or thin plastic, marked with distinguishing motifs and used as one of a set for playing card games. Playing cards are typically palm-sized for convenient handling, and were first invented in China
China
during the Tang dynasty.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Persia and Arabia 1.3 Egypt 1.4 Spread across Europe and early design changes 1.5 Later design changes2 Modern deck formats2.1 French suits3 Symbols in Unicode 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 Cited sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit]A Chinese printed playing card dated c
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Charlotte Elizabeth Schreiber
Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Guest (née Bertie; 19 May 1812 – 15 January 1895), later Lady Charlotte Schreiber, was an English aristocrat who is best known as the first publisher in modern print format of The Mabinogion
The Mabinogion
which is the earliest prose literature of Britain. Guest established The Mabinogion
The Mabinogion
as a source literature of Europe, claiming this recognition among literati in the context of contemporary passions for the Chivalric romance
Chivalric romance
of King Arthur
King Arthur
and the Gothic movement
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John Henderson (collector)
John Henderson (1797–1878) was an English collector of works of art. Life[edit] Born in Adelphi Terrace, London, he was son of John Henderson and Georgiana Jane, only child of George Keate, F.R.S. His father, an amateur artist, was an early patron of Thomas Girtin
Thomas Girtin
and J. M. W. Turner, who frequently worked together in his house. His father's income was from rents on 250 poor houses in Whitechapel. In 1805 Henderson's mother and father were receiving £700 in income per annum.[1] Charles Cooper Henderson
Charles Cooper Henderson
was his brother.[2] John Henderson the younger went at the age of sixteen as a fellow-commoner to Balliol College, Oxford
Balliol College, Oxford
(B.A. 1817 and M.A
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Richard Payne Knight
(Richard)[2] Payne Knight (11 February 1751 – 23 April 1824) of Downton Castle
Downton Castle
in Herefordshire, and of 5 Soho Square,[3] London, England, was a classical scholar, connoisseur, archaeologist[4][5] and numismatist[5] best known for his theories of picturesque beauty and for his interest in ancient phallic imagery. He served as a Member of Parliament for Leominster (1780-4) and for Ludlow (1784-1806).[6]Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Death & succession 4 Will & Knight v. Knight (1840) 5 Books 6 Visual arts 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksOrigins[edit] He was born at Wormesley Grange, five miles north-west of Hereford
Hereford
in Herefordshire, the eldest son of Rev
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Kensal Green Cemetery
Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery is in Kensal Green
Kensal Green
in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. Inspired by Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, it was founded by the barrister George Frederick Carden.[1] The cemetery opened in 1833 and comprises 72 acres of grounds, including two conservation areas, adjoining a canal. The cemetery is home to at least 33 species of bird and other wildlife. This distinctive cemetery has memorials ranging from large mausoleums housing the rich and famous to many distinctive smaller graves and includes special areas dedicated to the very young. It has three chapels, and serves all faiths.[2] The cemetery was immortalised in the lines of G. K
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