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Auditoire De Calvin
The Calvin Auditorium
Auditorium
or Calvin Auditory
Calvin Auditory
(French Auditoire de Calvin), originally the Notre-Dame-la-Neuve Chapel, is a chapel in Geneva, Switzerland, which played a significant role in the Protestant Reformation. It is associated with John Calvin, Theodore Beza
Theodore Beza
and John Knox. The auditorium lies directly adjacent to St. Pierre Cathedral
St. Pierre Cathedral
in the Place de la Taconnerie. The austere Gothic-style building was constructed in the 15th century, on the site of earlier 5th-century religious buildings, and was originally dedicated to Notre-Dame-la-Neuve.The Auditory in the south shadow of the CathedralFrom 1536, the time of Geneva's Reformation, it became a lecture hall where Calvin actively expounded his reformed theology: Bible
Bible
studies were conducted here at 7:00 each morning
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Hans Wilsdorf Foundation
Rolex
Rolex
SA (/ˈroʊlɛks/) is a Swiss luxury watchmaker. The company and its subsidiary Montres Tudor SA design, manufacture, distribute and service wristwatches sold under the Rolex
Rolex
and Tudor brands
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Place Of Worship
A place of worship is a specially designed structure or consecrated space where individuals or a group of people such as a congregation come to perform acts of devotion, veneration, or religious study. A building constructed or used for this purpose is sometimes called a house of worship. Temples, churches, synagogues and mosques are examples of structures created for worship. A monastery, particularly for Buddhists, may serve both to house those belonging to religious orders and as a place of worship for visitors
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Church Of Scotland
The Church of Scotland
Scotland
(Scots: The Scots Kirk, Scottish Gaelic: Eaglais na h-Alba), known informally by its Scots language
Scots language
name, the Kirk, is the national church of Scotland.[4] Protestant
Protestant
and Presbyterian, its longstanding decision to respect "liberty of opinion in points which do not enter into the substance of the Faith"[5] means it is tolerant of a variety of theological positions, including those who would term themselves conservative and liberal in their doctrine, ethics and interpretation of Scripture. The Church of Scotland
Scotland
traces its roots back to the beginnings of Christianity in Scotland, but its identity is principally shaped by the Reformation of 1560
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Protestant Church Of Geneva
The Protestant Church of Geneva (EPG, French: Église protestante de Genève) is an organization of congregations in the Canton of Geneva. It was founded in 1536 during the Protestant Reformation.[1] It was the state church of Geneva from its inception until 1907.[2] It is a member of the Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches, and through that body a member of the World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches
and the World Communion of Reformed Churches. As of 2003, the church had approximately 94,472 members, of which 15,095 were baptized.[3] The ministers of the church are organized in the Company of Pastors and the Genevan Consistory
Genevan Consistory
functions as a sort of parliament of the church.[4] References[edit]^ Reformed Online database ^ Rüegger, Heinz (16 October 2006). "Eglises évangéliques réformées". Dictionnaire historique de la Suisse (in French)
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World Alliance Of Reformed Churches
The World Alliance of Reformed
Reformed
Churches (WARC) was a fellowship of more than 200 churches with roots in the 16th-century Reformation, and particularly in the theology of John Calvin. Its headquarters was in Geneva, Switzerland. They are now merged into the World Communion of Reformed
Reformed
Churches.Contents1 History 2 Assemblies 3 Presidents 4 General Secretaries 5 Members (2006) 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The World Alliance of Reformed
Reformed
Churches (WARC) was created in 1970 by a merger of two bodies, the Alliance of the Reformed
Reformed
Churches holding the Presbyterian
Presbyterian
System, representing Presbyterian
Presbyterian
and Reformed churches, and the International Congregational Council
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Reformed Churches
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
is a part of the Reformed tradition
Reformed tradition
within Protestantism
Protestantism
which traces its origins to the British Isles, particularly Scotland. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government, which is governed by representative assemblies of elders. A great number of Reformed churches
Reformed churches
are organized this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied uniquely to churches that trace their roots to the Scottish and English Presbyterians, as well as several English dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.[2] Presbyterian theology typically emphasizes the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures, and the necessity of grace through faith in Christ
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Dutch Reformed Church
The Dutch Reformed
Reformed
Church (in Dutch: Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk or NHK) was the largest Christian denomination
Christian denomination
in the Netherlands
Netherlands
from the onset of the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation until 1930.[1] It was the foremost Protestant
Protestant
denomination, and—since 1892—one of the two major Reformed
Reformed
denominations along with the Reformed
Reformed
Churches in the Netherlands. It spread to the United States, South Africa, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Brazil, and various other world regions through the Dutch colonization
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Waldensians
The Waldensians
Waldensians
(also known variously as Waldenses (/wɔːlˈdɛnsiːz, wɒl-/), Vallenses, Valdesi or Vaudois) are a pre- Protestant
Protestant
Christian movement founded by Peter Waldo
Peter Waldo
in Lyon around 1173. In the era of the Reformation, the Waldensians
Waldensians
influenced early Swiss reformer Heinrich Bullinger. Upon finding the ideas of other reformers similar to their own, they quickly merged into the larger Protestant movement, becoming a part of the Calvinist
Calvinist
tradition.[citation needed] The Waldensian movement first appeared in Lyon
Lyon
in the late 1170s[citation needed] and quickly spread to the Cottian Alps
Cottian Alps
between what is today France
France
and Italy
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Scottish Reformation
The Scottish Reformation
Reformation
was the process by which Scotland
Scotland
broke with the Papacy and developed a predominantly Calvinist
Calvinist
national Kirk (church), which was strongly Presbyterian
Presbyterian
in outlook. It was part of the wider European Protestant Reformation
Reformation
that took place from the sixteenth century. From the late fifteenth century the ideas of Renaissance
Renaissance
humanism, critical of aspects of the established Catholic Church, began to reach Scotland, particularly through the contacts between Scottish and continental scholars. In the earlier part of the sixteenth century, the teachings of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
began to influence Scotland. Particularly important was the work of the Lutheran Scot Patrick Hamilton, who was executed in 1528
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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