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Atyuryevsky District
Atyuryevsky District
Atyuryevsky District
(Russian: Атю́рьевский райо́н; Moksha: Атерень аймак; Erzya: Атюрьбуе) is an administrative[1] and municipal[3] district (raion), one of the twenty-two in the Republic of Mordovia, Russia. It is located in the west of the republic
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Russian Census (2002)
The Russian Census
Census
of 2002 (Russian: Всеросси́йская пе́репись населе́ния 2002 го́да) was the first census of the Russian Federation
Russian Federation
since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, carried out on October 9 through October 16, 2002. It was carried out by the Russian Federal Service of State Statistics (Rosstat).Contents1 Data collection1.1 Resident population 1.2 Non-residents2 Census
Census
results2.1 Citizenship 2.2 Language abilities3 See also 4 External linksData collection[edit] The census data were collected as of midnight October 9, 2002. Resident population[edit] The census was primarily intended to collect statistical information about the resident population of Russian Federation
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Russia
Coordinates: 60°N 90°E / 60°N 90°E / 60; 90Russian Federation Росси́йская Федерaция (Russian) Rossiyskaya FederatsiyaFlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Gosudarstvenny gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii"  (transliteration) "State Anthem of the Russian Federation"Location of Russia
Russia
(green) Russian-administered
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State Assembly Of The Republic Of Mordovia
The State Assembly of Mordovia
Mordovia
is the unicameral regional legislature of the Russian republic of Mordovia
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Government Of Russia
The Government of Russia
Russia
exercises executive power in the Russian Federation. The members of the government are the Prime Minister, the deputy prime ministers, and the federal ministers. It has its legal basis in the Constitution
Constitution
of the Russian Federation
Russian Federation
and the federal constitutional law "On the Government the Russian Federation".[1] According to the 1991 amendment to the 1978 Russian Constitution, the President of Russia
Russia
was the head of the executive branch and headed the Council of Ministers of Russia. According to the current 1993 Constitution
Constitution
of Russia, the President is not a part of the Government of Russia, which exercises executive power. But, the President does appoint the Prime Minister
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Russian Federal State Statistics Service
Russian Federal State Statistics
Statistics
Service (Russian: Федеральная служба государственной статистики, Federal'naya sluzhba gosudarstvennoi statistiki) (also known as Rosstat) is the governmental statistics agency in Russia. Since 2017, it is again part of the Ministry of Economic Development, having switched several times in the previous decades between that ministry and being directly controlled by the federal government. History[edit] Goskomstat (Russian: Государственный комитет по статистике, Gosudarstvennyi komitet po statistike, or, in English, the State Committee for Statistics) was the centralised agency dealing with statistics in the Soviet Union
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Raion
A raion (also rayon) is a type of administrative unit of several post-Soviet states (such as part of an oblast). The term is from the French "rayon" (meaning "honeycomb, department"),[1] which is both a type of a subnational entity and a division of a city, and is commonly translated in English as "district".[2] The term "raion" also can be used simply as a kind of administrative division without anything to do with ethnicity or nationality. A raion is a standardized administrative entity across most of the former Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and is usually a subdivision two steps below the national level. However, in smaller USSR republics, it could be the primary level of administrative division (Administrative divisions of Armenia, Administrative divisions of Azerbaijan)
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Erzya Language
The Erzya language (Erzya: эрзянь кель, translit. erzäny kel) is spoken by about 37,000 people in the northern, eastern and north-western parts of the Republic of Mordovia and adjacent regions of Nizhny Novgorod, Chuvashia, Penza, Samara, Saratov, Orenburg, Ulyanovsk, Tatarstan
Tatarstan
and Bashkortostan
Bashkortostan
in Russia. A diaspora can also be found in Armenia, Estonia
Estonia
as well as in Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and other newly independent states of Central Asia. Erzya is currently written using Cyrillic
Cyrillic
with no modifications to the variant used by the Russian language
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Moksha Language
The Moksha language
Moksha language
(Moksha: мокшень кяль, translit. mokšeny käl) is a member of the Mordvinic branch of the Uralic languages, with around 2,000 native speakers (2010 Russian census). Moksha is the majority language in the western part of Mordovia.[3] Its closest relative is the Erzya language, with which it is not mutually intelligible. Moksha is also considered to be closely related to the extinct Meshcherian and Muromian languages.[4]Contents1 Official status 2 Education 3 Dialects 4 Phonology4.1 Vowels 4.2 Consonants4.2.1 Devoicing4.3 Stress5 Grammar 6 Writing system 7 Literature 8 Common expressions (Moksha–Russian–English) 9 See also 10 References 11 Bibliography 12 External linksOfficial status[edit] Moksha is one of the three official languages in Mordovia
Mordovia
(the others being Erzya and Russian)
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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Soviet Census (1979)
In January 1979, the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
conducted its first census in nine years (since 1970).[1] Between 1970 and 1979, the total Soviet population increased from 241,720,134 to 262,084,654, an increase of 8.42%. Summary[edit]Moscow in 1970
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Soviet Census (1989)
The 1989 Soviet census (Russian: Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989, "1989 All-Union Census"), conducted between 12-19 January of that year, was the last one that took place in the former USSR. The census found the total population to be 286,730,819 inhabitants.[1] In 1989, the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
ranked as the third most populous in the world, above the United States
United States
(with 248,709,873 inhabitants according to the 1 April 1990 census), although it was well behind China
China
and India.Contents1 Statistics 2 SSR Rankings 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksStatistics[edit] In 1989, about half of the Soviet Union's total population lived in the Russian SFSR, and approximately one-sixth (18%) of them in Ukraine
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Capital City
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
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Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
(or simply Commons) is an online repository of free-use images, sound, and other media files.[1] It is a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. Files from Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
can be used across all Wikimedia projects[2] in all languages, including, Wikibooks, Wikivoyage, Wikispecies, Wikisource, and Wikinews, or downloaded for offsite use
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Types Of Inhabited Localities In Russia
The classification system of the types of inhabited localities in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.[citation needed]Contents1 Modern classification in Russia1.1 Urban localities 1.2 Rural localities2 Historical terms 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksModern classification in Russia[edit] During the Soviet time, each of the republics of the Soviet Union, including the Russian SFSR, had its own legislative documents dealing with classification of inhabited localities.[1] After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the task of developing and maintaining such classification in Russia
Russia
was delegated to the federal subjects.[2] While currently there are certain peculiarities to classifications used in many federal subjects, they are all still largely based on the system used in the RSFSR
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