HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Attenuation
In physics, attenuation or, in some contexts, extinction is the gradual loss of flux intensity through a medium. For instance, dark glasses attenuate sunlight, lead attenuates X-rays, and water and air attenuate both light and sound at variable attenuation rates. Hearing protectors
Hearing protectors
help reduce acoustic flux from flowing into the ears. This phenomenon is called acoustic attenuation and is measured in decibels (dBs). In electrical engineering and telecommunications, attenuation affects the propagation of waves and signals in electrical circuits, in optical fibers, and in air
[...More...]

"Attenuation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Visible Spectrum
The visible spectrum is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. Electromagnetic radiation
Electromagnetic radiation
in this range of wavelengths is called visible light or simply light. A typical human eye will respond to wavelengths from about 390 to 700 nm.[1] In terms of frequency, this corresponds to a band in the vicinity of 430–770 THz. The spectrum does not, however, contain all the colors that the human eyes and brain can distinguish. Unsaturated colors such as pink, or purple variations such as magenta, are absent, for example, because they can be made only by a mix of multiple wavelengths. Colors containing only one wavelength are also called pure colors or spectral colors. Visible wavelengths pass through the "optical window", the region of the electromagnetic spectrum that allows wavelengths to pass largely unattenuated through the Earth's atmosphere
[...More...]

"Visible Spectrum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Colloid
In chemistry, a colloid is a mixture in which one substance of microscopically dispersed insoluble particles is suspended throughout another substance. Sometimes the dispersed substance alone is called the colloid;[1] the term colloidal suspension refers unambiguously to the overall mixture (although a narrower sense of the word suspension is distinguished from colloids by larger particle size). Unlike a solution, whose solute and solvent constitute only one phase, a colloid has a dispersed phase (the suspended particles) and a continuous phase (the medium of suspension)
[...More...]

"Colloid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Coefficient
In mathematics, a coefficient is a multiplicative factor in some term of a polynomial, a series or any expression; it is usually a number, but may be any expression. In the latter case, the variables appearing in the coefficients are often called parameters, and must be clearly distinguished from the other variables. For example, in 7 x 2 − 3 x y + 1.5 + y , displaystyle 7x^ 2 -3xy+1.5+y, the first two terms respectively have the coefficients 7 and −3. The third term 1.5 is a constant. The final term does not have any explicitly written coefficient, but is considered to have coefficient 1, since multiplying by that factor would not change the term. Often coefficients are numbers as in this example, although they could be parameters of the problem or any expression in these parameters
[...More...]

"Coefficient" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earthquake
An earthquake (also known as a quake, tremor or temblor) is the shaking of the surface of the Earth, resulting from the sudden release of energy in the Earth's lithosphere that creates seismic waves. Earthquakes can range in size from those that are so weak that they cannot be felt to those violent enough to toss people around and destroy whole cities. The seismicity or seismic activity of an area refers to the frequency, type and size of earthquakes experienced over a period of time. The word tremor is also used for non-earthquake seismic rumbling. At the Earth's surface, earthquakes manifest themselves by shaking and sometimes displacement of the ground. When the epicenter of a large earthquake is located offshore, the seabed may be displaced sufficiently to cause a tsunami
[...More...]

"Earthquake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seismic Waves
Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, magma movement, large landslides and large man-made explosions that give out low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low-amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave
Seismic wave
fields are recorded by a seismometer, hydrophone (in water), or accelerometer. The propagation velocity of the waves depends on density and elasticity of the medium. Velocity tends to increase with depth and ranges from approximately 2 to 8 km/s in the Earth's crust, up to 13 km/s in the deep mantle.[2] Earthquakes create distinct types of waves with different velocities; when reaching seismic observatories, their different travel times help scientists to locate the source of the hypocenter
[...More...]

"Seismic Waves" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hypocenter
A hypocenter (or hypocentre) (from Ancient Greek: ὑπόκεντρον [hypόkentron] for 'below the center') is the point of origin of an earthquake or a subsurface nuclear explosion. In seismology, it is a synonym of the focus.[1] The term hypocenter is also used as a synonym for ground zero, the surface point directly beneath a nuclear airburst. Earthquakes[edit] An earthquake's hypocenter is the position where the strain energy stored in the rock is first released, marking the point where the fault begins to rupture.[1] This occurs directly beneath the epicenter, at a distance known as the focal or hypocentral depth.[1] The focal depth can be calculated from measurements based on seismic wave phenomena. As with all wave phenomena in physics, there is uncertainty in such measurements that grows with the wavelength so the focal depth of the source of these long-wavelength (low frequency) waves is difficult to determine exactly
[...More...]

"Hypocenter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earth
Earth
Earth
is the third planet from the Sun
Sun
and the only object in the Universe
Universe
known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth
Earth
formed over 4.5 billion years ago.[24][25][26] Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun
Sun
and the Moon, Earth's only natural satellite. Earth
Earth
revolves around the Sun
Sun
in 365.26 days, a period known as an Earth
Earth
year
[...More...]

"Earth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ultrasound
Ultrasound
Ultrasound
is sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper audible limit of human hearing. Ultrasound
Ultrasound
is no different from 'normal' (audible) sound in its physical properties, except in that humans cannot hear it. This limit varies from person to person and is approximately 20 kilohertz (20,000 hertz) in healthy, young adults. Ultrasound
Ultrasound
devices operate with frequencies from 20 kHz up to several gigahertz. Ultrasound
Ultrasound
is used in many different fields. Ultrasonic devices are used to detect objects and measure distances. Ultrasound imaging
Ultrasound imaging
or sonography is often used in medicine. In the nondestructive testing of products and structures, ultrasound is used to detect invisible flaws. Industrially, ultrasound is used for cleaning, mixing, and to accelerate chemical processes
[...More...]

"Ultrasound" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heterogeneous
Homogeneity and heterogeneity
Homogeneity and heterogeneity
are concepts often used in the sciences and statistics relating to the uniformity in a substance or organism. A material or image that is homogeneous is uniform in composition or character (i.e
[...More...]

"Heterogeneous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Emulsion
Note 1: The definition is based on the definition in ref.[1] Note 2: The droplets may be amorphous, liquid-crystalline, or any mixture thereof. Note 3: The diameters of the droplets constituting the dispersed phase usually range from approximately 10 nm to 100 μm; i.e., the droplets may exceed the usual size limits for colloidal particles. Note 4: An emulsion is termed an oil/water (o/w) emulsion if the dispersed phase is an organic material and the continuous phase is water or an aqueous solution and is termed water/oil (w/o) if the dispersed phase is water or an aqueous solution and the continuous phase is an organic liquid (an "oil"). Note 5: A w/o emulsion is sometimes called an inverse emulsion. The term "inverse emulsion" is misleading, suggesting incorrectly that the emulsion has properties that are the opposite of those of an emulsion. Its use is, therefore, not recommended.[2]An emulsion is a mixture of two or more liquids that are normally immiscible (unmixable or unb
[...More...]

"Emulsion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Particle Size Distribution
The particle-size distribution (PSD) of a powder, or granular material, or particles dispersed in fluid, is a list of values or a mathematical function that defines the relative amount, typically by mass, of particles present according to size.[1] Significant energy is usually required to disintegrate soil, etc
[...More...]

"Particle Size Distribution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Exponential Function
In mathematics, an exponential function is a function of the form f ( x ) = b x displaystyle f(x)=b^ x , in which the input variable x occurs as an exponent. A function of the form f ( x ) = b x + c displaystyle f(x)=b^ x+c , where c displaystyle c is a constant, is also considered an exponential function and can be rewritten as f ( x ) = a b x displaystyle f(x)=ab^ x , with a = b c displaystyle a=b^ c . As functions of a real variable, exponential functions are uniquely characterized by the fact that the growth rate of such a function (i.e., its derivative) is directly proportional to the value of the function
[...More...]

"Exponential Function" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Extensional Rheology
Rheology
Rheology
(/riːˈɒlədʒi/; from Greek ῥέω rhéō, "flow" and -λoγία, -logia, "study of") is the study of the flow of matter, primarily in a liquid state, but also as "soft solids" or solids under conditions in which they respond with plastic flow rather than deforming elastically in response to an applied force. It is a branch of physics which deals with the deformation and flow of materials, both solids and liquids. [1] The term rheology was coined by Eugene C. Bingham, a professor at Lafayette College, in 1920, from a suggestion by a colleague, Markus Reiner.[2][3] The term was inspired by the aphorism of Simplicius (often attributed to Heraclitus), panta rhei, "everything flows",[4][5] and was first used to describe the flow of liquids and the deformation of solids
[...More...]

"Extensional Rheology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Extensional Viscosity
Extensional viscosity (also known as elongational viscosity) is a viscosity coefficient when applied stress is extensional stress.[1]This parameter is often used for characterizing polymer solutions. Extensional viscosity can be measured using rheometers that apply extensional stress
[...More...]

"Extensional Viscosity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Volume Viscosity
Volume viscosity (also called second coefficient of viscosity or dilatational viscosity or bulk viscosity) becomes important only for such effects where fluid compressibility is essential. Volume viscosity is mainly related to the vibrational energy of the molecules.[1] It is zero for monatomic gases at low density, but can be large for fluids with larger molecules. The volume viscosity is important in describing sound attenuation in molecular gases, and the absorption of sound energy into the fluid depends on the sound frequency i.e. the rate of fluid compression and expansion. Volume viscosity is also important in describing the fluid dynamics of liquids containing gas bubbles
[...More...]

"Volume Viscosity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.