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Atlantic Monthly
The Atlantic
The Atlantic
is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts. The magazine was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, and published leading writers' commentary on abolition, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. The magazine's initiator, and one of the founders, was Francis H. Underwood,[3][4] The other founding sponsors were prominent writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Greenleaf Whittier.[5][6] James Russell Lowell
James Russell Lowell
was its first editor.[7] After struggling with financial hardship and a series of ownership changes since the late 20th century, the magazine was reformatted in the early 21st century as a general editorial magazine
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Civil Disobedience
Civil disobedience
Civil disobedience
is the active, professed refusal of a citizen to obey certain laws of the state, and/or demands, orders, and commands of a government, or of an occupying international power. Civil disobedience is sometimes defined as having to be nonviolent to be called civil disobedience
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Mashable
Mashable
Mashable
is a digital media website founded by Pete Cashmore
Pete Cashmore
in 2005.[7]Contents1 History 2 Mashable
Mashable
Awards 3 Mashable
Mashable
Connect conference 4 Mashable
Mashable
editions and subsidiaries 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Mashable
Mashable
was created by Pete Cashmore
Pete Cashmore
from his home in Aberdeen, Scotland, in July 2005. Time noted Mashable
Mashable
as one of the 25 best blogs in 2009.[8][9] As of November 2015, it has over 6,000,000 Twitter
Twitter
followers and over 3,200,000 fans on Facebook. In June 2016, it acquired YouTube
YouTube
channel CineFix from Whalerock Industries.[10] In December 2017, Ziff Davis
Ziff Davis
bought Mashable
Mashable
for $50 million
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Emerson Collective
Emerson Collective is an American non-profit organization based in Palo Alto, California. It was founded in 2004 and is run by Laurene Powell Jobs.[2] Selected investments[edit] On September 1, 2016, Emerson Collective invested US$10 million in series A funding for Axios Media, a news website focusing on business, technology, politics and media trends.[5][6] On July 26, 2017, Within, a Los Angeles-based virtual/augmented reality company, announced it had raised US$40 million in series B funding. Emerson Collective was a lead investor alongside Temasek Holdings.[7][8] On July 28, 2017, Emerson Collective became the majority owner of The Atlantic, purchasing the majority stake from Atlantic Media's David G. Bradley.[9][10] The outlets owned by Emerson Collective include The Atlantic magazine and its digital properties along with its standout events line and Atlantic Media Strategies
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Thought Leader
A thought leader is an individual or firm that is recognized as an authority in a specialized field and whose expertise is sought and often rewarded.[1] The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
gives as its first citation for the phrase an 1887 description of Henry Ward Beecher
Henry Ward Beecher
as "one of the great thought-leaders in America." In a 1990 article in the Wall Street Journal
Wall Street Journal
Marketing
Marketing
section, Patrick Reilly used the term "thought leader publications" to refer to such magazines as Harper's
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Foreign Affairs
Foreign Affairs
Foreign Affairs
is an American magazine of international relations and U.S. foreign policy
U.S. foreign policy
published by the Council on Foreign Relations, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, membership organization and think tank specializing in U.S. foreign policy
U.S. foreign policy
and international affairs.[1] Founded in 1922, the print magazine is currently published every two months, while the website publishes articles daily and anthologies every other month. Foreign Affairs
Foreign Affairs
is considered one of the United States' most influential foreign policy magazines. Over its long history, the magazine has published a number of seminal articles including George Kennan's "X Article", published in 1947, and Samuel P
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Douglas Engelbart
Douglas Carl Engelbart (January 30, 1925 – July 2, 2013) was an American engineer and inventor, and an early computer and Internet pioneer. He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces. These were demonstrated at The Mother of All Demos
The Mother of All Demos
in 1968. Engelbart's Law, the observation that the intrinsic rate of human performance is exponential, is named after him. In the early 1950s, he decided that instead of "having a steady job" – such as his position at Ames Research Center
Ames Research Center
– he would focus on making the world a better place
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Ted Nelson
Theodor Holm "Ted" Nelson (born June 17, 1937) is an American pioneer of information technology, philosopher, and sociologist. He coined the terms hypertext and hypermedia in 1963 and published them in 1965.[1] Nelson coined the terms transclusion,[1] virtuality,[2] and intertwingularity (in Literary Machines), and teledildonics[3].Contents1 Early life and education 2 Project Xanadu 3 Other projects 4 ZigZag 5 Influence and recognition5.1 Neologisms6 Publications 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Nelson is the son of Emmy Award-winning director Ralph Nelson
Ralph Nelson
and the Academy Award-winning actress Celeste Holm.[4] His parents' marriage was brief and he was mostly raised by his grandparents, first in Chicago
Chicago
and later in Greenwich Village.[5] Nelson earned a BA from Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
in 1959
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Workstation
A workstation is a special computer designed for technical or scientific applications. Intended primarily to be used by one person at a time, they are commonly connected to a local area network and run multi-user operating systems. The term workstation has also been used loosely to refer to everything from a mainframe computer terminal to a PC connected to a network, but the most common form refers to the group of hardware offered by several current and defunct companies such as Sun Microsystems, Silicon Graphics, Apollo Computer, DEC, HP, NeXT
NeXT
and IBM
IBM
which opened the door for the 3D graphics animation revolution of the late 1990s. Workstations offered higher performance than mainstream personal computers, especially with respect to CPU and graphics, memory capacity, and multitasking capability
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Long-form Journalism
Long-form journalism is a branch of journalism dedicated to longer articles with larger amounts of content.[1] Typically this will be between 1,000 and 20,000 words. Long-form articles often take the form of creative nonfiction or narrative journalism.Contents1 History1.1 Middle Ages 1.2 Renaissance 1.3 Early modern Europe 1.4 20th century 1.5 21st century2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingHistory[edit] Middle Ages[edit] Main article: Tract (literature) The distribution of tracts pre-dates the development of the printing press, with the term being applied by scholars to religious and political works at least as early as the 13th century. They were used to disseminate the teachings of John Wycliffe in the 14th century. As a political tool, tracts proliferated throughout Europe during the 17th century
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Antislavery Movement In America
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
in the United States was the movement before and during the American Civil War
American Civil War
to end slavery in the United States. In the Americas and western Europe, abolitionism was a movement to end the Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
and set slaves free. In the 17th century, English Quakers
Quakers
and Evangelicals condemned slavery as un-Christian. At that time, most slaves were Africans, but thousands of Native Americans were also enslaved. In the 18th century, as many as six million Africans were transported to the Americas as slaves, at least a third of them on British ships to North America
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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Ta-Nehisi Coates
Ta-Nehisi Paul Coates[1] (/ˌtɑːnəˈhɑːsi ˈkoʊts/ TAH-nə-HAH-see KOHTS;[2] born September 30, 1975)[3] is an American author, journalist, comic book writer, and educator. Coates is a national correspondent for The Atlantic, where he writes about cultural, social and political issues, particularly regarding African Americans. Coates has worked for The Village Voice, Washington City Paper, and Time. He has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Washington Monthly, O, and other publications. In 2008 he published a memoir, The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood. His second book, Between the World and Me, was released in July 2015. It won the 2015 National Book Award for Nonfiction,[4][5] and was a nominee for the Phi Beta Kappa 2016 Book Awards.[6] He was the recipient of a "Genius Grant" from the John D. and Catherine T
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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