HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Athenian Democracy
Athenian democracy
Athenian democracy
developed around the fifth century BC in the Greek city-state (known as a polis) of Athens, comprising the city of Athens and the surrounding territory of Attica, and is the first known democracy in the world. Other Greek cities set up democracies, most following the Athenian model, but none are as well documented as Athens'. It was a system of direct democracy, in which participating citizens voted directly on legislation and executive bills. Participation was not open to all residents: to vote one had to be an adult, male citizen i.e. neither a foreign resident, slave or a woman and the number of these "varied between 30,000 and 50,000 out of a total population of around 250,000 to 300,000" or "no more than 30 percent of the total adult population."[1] The longest-lasting democratic leader was Pericles
[...More...]

"Athenian Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philipp Foltz
Philipp von Foltz (11 May 1805 – 5 August 1877) was a German history painter. Biography[edit] He was born in Bingen am Rhein. His father, Ludwig, a painter of some note, gave him his first art lessons. In 1825, he went to Munich, where he was accepted at the Academy of Fine Arts and studied with Peter von Cornelius. Soon, he was allowed to assist Cornelius with his frescoes at the Glyptothek
Glyptothek
and the Hofgarten. Later, he assisted Wilhelm Lindenschmit the Elder
Wilhelm Lindenschmit the Elder
at the new Royal Palace, creating murals based on the ballads of Friedrich Schiller. At this time, he also began to create a series of oil paintings on historical subjects; notably one of King Otto saying farewell on his way to Greece. In 1835, he took a study trip to Rome, where he created his monumental painting "Des Sängers Fluch" (The Singer's Curse), based on the poem by Ludwig Uhland
[...More...]

"Philipp Foltz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Legislation
Legislation (or "statutory law") is law which has been promulgated (or "enacted") by a legislature or other governing body or the process of making it.[1] Before an item of legislation becomes law it may be known as a bill, and may be broadly referred to as "legislation", while it remains under consideration to distinguish it from other business. Legislation can have many purposes: to regulate, to authorize, to outlaw, to provide (funds), to sanction, to grant, to declare or to restrict. It may be contrasted with a non-legislative act which is adopted by an executive or administrative body under the authority of a legislative act or for implementing a legislative act.[2] Under the Westminster system, an item of primary legislation is known as an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
after enactment. Legislation is usually proposed by a member of the legislature (e.g
[...More...]

"Legislation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

People's Democracy (Marxism–Leninism)
People's democracy was a theoretical concept within Marxism–Leninism (and a form of government in communist states) which developed after World War II, which allowed in theory for a multi-class, multi-party democracy on the pathway to socialism. Prior to the rise of Fascism, communist parties had called for Soviet Republics to be implemented throughout the world, such as the Chinese Soviet Republic
Chinese Soviet Republic
or William Z. Foster's book Towards Soviet America
[...More...]

"People's Democracy (Marxism–Leninism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Multiparty Democracy
A multi-party system is a system in which multiple political parties across the political spectrum run for national election, and all have the capacity to gain control of government offices, separately or in coalition.[1] Apart from one-party-dominant and two-party systems, multi-party systems tend to be more common in parliamentary systems than presidential systems and far more common in countries that use proportional representation compared to countries that use first-past-the-post elections. First-past-the-post
First-past-the-post
requires concentrated areas of support for large representation in the legislature whereas proportional representation better reflects the range of a population's views. Proportional systems have multi-member districts with more than one representative elected from a given district to the same legislative body, and thus a greater number of viable parties
[...More...]

"Multiparty Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Media Democracy
Media and democracy is a liberal-democratic approach to media studies that advocates for reforming the mass media, strengthening public service broadcasting, developing and participating in alternative media and citizen journalism, in order to create a mass media system that informs and empowers all members of society, and enhances democratic values. Media is also defined as "medium" a way of communicating with others[1].Contents1 Definition 2 Media ownership concentration 3 Internet media democracy 4 Feminism 5 Criticism 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingDefinition[edit] Media democracy focuses on using information technologies to both empower individual citizens and promote democratic ideals through the spread of information.[2] Additionally, the media system itself should be democratic in its own construction [3] shying away from private ownership or intense regulation
[...More...]

"Media Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jeffersonian Democracy
Jeffersonian democracy, named after its advocate Thomas Jefferson, was one of two dominant political outlooks and movements in the United States from the 1790s to the 1820s. The term was commonly used to refer to the Democratic-Republican Party (formally named the "Republican Party"), which Jefferson founded in opposition to the Federalist Party of Alexander Hamilton
[...More...]

"Jeffersonian Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Empowered Democracy
Empowered democracy is an alternative form of social-democratic arrangements developed by philosopher and politician Roberto Mangabeira Unger. Theorized in response to the repressiveness and rigidity of contemporary liberal democratic society, the theory of empowered democracy envisions a more open and more plastic set of social institutions through which individuals and groups can interact, propose change, and effectively empower themselves to transform social, economic, and political structures. The key strategy is to combine freedom of commerce and governance at the local level with the ability of political parties at the central level to promote radical social experiments that would bring about decisive change in social and political institutions.[1] The theory of empowered democracy has received widespread critical acclaim
[...More...]

"Empowered Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Defensive Democracy
Defensive democracy is the philosophy that members of a democratic society believe it necessary to limit some rights and freedoms, in order to protect the institutions of the democracy.Contents1 Examples1.1 Israel 1.2 Europe 1.3 Republic of Korea
Republic of Korea
(South Korea) 1.4 Republic of China
[...More...]

"Defensive Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cosmopolitan Democracy
Cosmopolitan democracy is a political theory which explores the application of norms and values of democracy at the transnational and global sphere. It argues that global governance of the people, by the people, for the people is possible and needed. Writers advocating cosmopolitan democracy include Immanuel Kant,[1] David Held,[2][3] Daniele Archibugi,[4] Richard Falk,[5] and Mary Kaldor.[6] In the cosmopolitan democracy model, decisions are made by those affected, avoiding a single hierarchical form of authority. According to the nature of the issues at stake, democratic practice should be reinvented to take into account the will of stakeholders
[...More...]

"Cosmopolitan Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Eucleides
Eucleides[1] (Greek: Εὐκλείδης) was archon of Athens
Athens
towards the end of the fifth century BC. He contributed towards the re-establishment of democracy during his years in office (403-402 BC). He is also believed to have contributed to the new political order, with proposals that sought to deal with the challenge of the potentially disruptive minority who had supported oligarchy in the previous years.[2] Work[edit] During his archonship many Greek poleis changed their epichoric alphabet adopting the Ionic script. He supported a decree to change the alphabet and adopt Ionian script. Athenians accepted a spelling reform, adopting the Ionian alphabet, which included eta and omega. There are inscriptions from Athens
Athens
which used Ionian spelling before it was official and others which continued to use the old Attic spelling after it was repudiated
[...More...]

"Eucleides" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Oligarchic
Oligarchy (from Greek ὀλιγαρχία (oligarkhía); from ὀλίγος (olígos), meaning 'few', and ἄρχω (arkho), meaning 'to rule or to command')[1][2][3] is a form of power structure in which power rests with a small number of people. These people might be distinguished by nobility, wealth, family ties, education or corporate, religious or military control. Such states are often controlled by families who typically pass their influence from one generation to the next, but inheritance is not a necessary condition for the application of this term. Throughout history, oligarchies have often been tyrannical, relying on public obedience or oppression to exist
[...More...]

"Oligarchic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cellular Democracy
As developed by geolibertarian political economist Fred E. Foldvary, cellular democracy is a model of democracy based on multi-level bottom-up structure based on either small neighborhood governmental districts or contractual communities.Contents1 Councils 2 Secession 3 Taxation 4 Barangay 5 See also 6 ReferencesCouncils[edit] In cellular democracy, a jurisdiction such as a county or city is divided into neighborhood districts with a population of about 500 people, with about 100 to 200 households. The voters in the district would elect a council. The small size of districts would allow for more informed voters at a smaller cost. Representatives, plus one alternate, would be elected to the council. This would be a "level-1 council". A region containing 10 to 20 neighborhood districts would then vote for a "level-2 council"
[...More...]

"Cellular Democracy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Citizenship
Citizenship
Citizenship
is the status of a person recognized under the custom or law as being a legal member of a sovereign state or belonging to a nation. A person may have multiple citizenships and a person who does not have citizenship of any state is said to be stateless. Nationality
Nationality
is often used as a synonym for citizenship in English[1] – notably in international law – although the term is sometimes understood as denoting a person's membership of a nation (a large ethnic group).[2] In some countries, e.g
[...More...]

"Citizenship" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pericles' Funeral Oration
Pericles' Funeral
Funeral
Oration is a famous speech from Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War.[2] The speech was delivered by Pericles, an eminent Athenian politician, at the end of the first year of the Peloponnesian War
Peloponnesian War
(431–40
[...More...]

"Pericles' Funeral Oration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

City-state
A city-state is a sovereign state, also described as a type of small independent country, that usually consists of a single city and its dependent territories. Historically, this included cities such as Rome, Athens, Carthage,[1] and the Italian city-states
Italian city-states
during the Renaissance. As of March 2018 only a handful of sovereign city-states exist, with some disagreement as to which are city-states. A great deal of consensus exists that the term properly applies currently to Singapore, Monaco, and Vatican City. City states are also sometimes called micro-states which however also includes other configurations of very small countries. A number of other small states share similar characteristics, and therefore are sometimes also cited as modern city-states
[...More...]

"City-state" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.