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Athenian Acropolis
The Acropolis
Acropolis
of Athens
Athens
is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens
Athens
and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon. The word acropolis is from the Greek words ἄκρον (akron, "highest point, extremity") and πόλις (polis, "city").[1] Although the term acropolis is generic and there are many other acropoleis in Greece, the significance of the Acropolis
Acropolis
of Athens
Athens
is such that it is commonly known as "The Acropolis" without qualification. During ancient times it was known also more properly as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man, Cecrops, the first Athenian king. While there is evidence that the hill was inhabited as far back as the fourth millennium BC, it was Pericles
Pericles
(c
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Acropolis (neighbourhood)
Makrygianni or Makriyanni (Greek: Μακρυγιάννη, pronounced [makɾiˈʝani]) is a neighborhood of Athens, Greece. Also known as Acropolis, it is located in the south side of Acropolis and bounded between the avenues Dionysiou Areopagitou and Syngrou. The district is named after Ioannis Makrygiannis, Greek general of the Greek War of Independence, who used to own a house and fields in the area. Opposite the house of Ioannis Makrygiannis
Ioannis Makrygiannis
a military hospital was built – known as Weiler Building after the architect who designed it.[1][2] This building was later used as gendarmerie headquarters and a violent battle took place there during the Dekemvriana, in 1944. In the Makrygianni neighbourhood is located the new Acropolis Museum
Acropolis Museum
that was inaugurated in 2009.[3] References[edit]^ "Κτίριο Βάιλερ". athensattica.gr
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Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
Greece
was the period in Greek history lasting from the eighth century BC to the second Persian invasion of Greece
Greece
in 480 BC,[1] following the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
and succeeded by the Classical period. The period began with a massive increase in the Greek population[2] and a series of significant changes which rendered the Greek world at the end of the eighth century as entirely unrecognisable as compared to its beginning.[3] According to Anthony Snodgrass, the Archaic period in ancient Greece
Greece
was bounded by two revolutions in the Greek world
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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Attica
Coordinates: 38°05′0″N 23°30′0″E / 38.08333°N 23.50000°E / 38.08333; 23.50000Attica ΑττικήRegion of Ancient GreeceView from Kaisariani
Kaisariani
Hill looking towards Athens
Athens
and Piraeus, with Salamis visible in the backgroundMap of municipalities (demoi) in ancient AtticaLocation Central GreeceMajor cities Athens, PiraeusDialects AtticKey periods Athenian Empire (477–404 BC) Second Athenian Confederacy (378–338 BC) Attica
Attica
(Greek: Αττική, Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
Attikḗ or Attikī́; Ancient Greek: [atːikɛ̌ː] or Modern: [atiˈci]), or the Attic peninsula, is a historical region that encompasses the city of Athens, the capital of present-day Greece
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Mycenaean Greece
Mycenaean Greece
Greece
(or Mycenaean civilization) was the last phase of the Bronze Age
Bronze Age
in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1600–1100 BC. It represents the first advanced civilization in mainland Greece, with its palatial states, urban organization, works of art and writing system.[1] Among the centers of power that emerged, the most notable were those of Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens
Athens
in Central Greece
Greece
and Iolcos in Thessaly. The most prominent site was Mycenae, in Argolid, after which the culture of this era is named
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Megaron
The megaron (/ˈmɛɡəˌrɒn/; Ancient Greek: μέγαρον), plural megara /ˈmɛɡərə/, was the great hall in ancient Greek palace complexes. It was a rectangular hall, fronted by an open, two-columned porch, and a more or less central, open hearth vented though an oculus in the roof above it and surrounded by four columns. It is believed that the ruler of the area, called a wanax, had his throne placed in room containing the hearth
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Aegean Civilization
Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze
Bronze
Age civilizations of Greece
Greece
around the Aegean Sea. There are three distinct but communicating and interacting geographic regions covered by this term: Crete, the Cyclades
Cyclades
and the Greek mainland. Crete
Crete
is associated with the Minoan civilization
Minoan civilization
from the Early Bronze
Bronze
Age. The Cyclades converge with the mainland during the Early Helladic
Early Helladic
("Minyan") period and with Crete
Crete
in the Middle Minoan period. From ca
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Parapet
A parapet is a barrier which is an extension of the wall at the edge of a roof, terrace, balcony, walkway or other structure. The word comes ultimately from the Italian parapetto (parare "to cover/defend" and petto "breast"). The German equivalent Brustwehr has the same meaning
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Odyssey
The Odyssey
The Odyssey
(/ˈɒdəsi/;[1] Greek: Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia, pronounced [o.dýs.sej.ja] in Classical Attic) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey
The Odyssey
is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad
Iliad
is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey
Odyssey
was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia.[2] The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus
Odysseus
(known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy
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Cylon (ancient Athenian)
Cylon (Greek: Κύλων Kylon) was an Athenian associated with the first reliably dated event in Athenian history, the Cylonian Affair, an attempted seizure of power in the city. Cylon, one of the Athenian nobles and a previous victor of the Olympic Games, attempted a coup in 632 BC with support from Megara, where his father-in-law, Theagenes, was tyrant. The oracle at Delphi
Delphi
had advised him to seize Athens
Athens
during a festival of Zeus, which Cylon understood to mean the Olympics. However, the coup was opposed, and Cylon and his supporters took refuge in Athena's temple on the Acropolis. Cylon and his brother escaped, but his followers were cornered by Athens' nine archons
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Peloponnese
The Peloponnese
Peloponnese
(/ˈpɛləpəˌniːz/) or Peloponnesus (/ˌpɛləpəˈniːsəs/; Greek: Πελοπόννησος, Pelopónnēsos) is a peninsula and geographic region in southern Greece. It is separated from the central part of the country by the Isthmus and Gulf of Corinth
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Peisistratos
Peisistratos
Peisistratos
(Greek: Πεισίστρατος; died 528/7 BC), Latinized Pisistratus, the son of Hippocrates, was a ruler of ancient Athens
Athens
during most of the period between 561 and 527 BC.[citation needed] His legacy lies primarily in his instituting the Panathenaic Festival, historically assigned the date of 566 B.C., and the consequent first attempt at producing a definitive version of the Homeric epics. Peisistratos' championing of the lower class of Athens, the Hyperakrioi, (see below) is an early example of populism
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Coup
A coup d'état (/ˌkuː deɪˈtɑː/ ( listen); French: [ku deta]), also known simply as a coup, a putsch (/pʊtʃ/), golpe de estado, or an overthrow, is a type of revolution, where the illegal and overt seizure of a state by the military or other elites within the state apparatus occurs.[1]Contents1 Terminology1.1 Etymology 1.2 Use of the phrase 1.3 Putsch 1.4 Pronunciamiento2 History 3 Types 4 Predictors 5 Coup-proofing 6 Democratization 7 Repression after failed coups, and counter-coups 8 International responses 9 In Popular Media 10 Current leaders who assumed power via coups d'état 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 Bibliography 15 External linksTerminology[edit] Etymology[edit] Coup is when a country or a team attempt at taking something that is not theirs. The phrase coup d'état is French, literally meaning a "stroke of state" or "blow against the state"
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Hekatompedon
Hekatompedon
Hekatompedon
(Greek: Εκατόμπεδον) was an ancient Greek city of Epirus.[1] Located either in Lekel
Lekel
or Saraqinisht. Epirus
Epirus
in antiquityReferences[edit]^ An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis: An Investigation Conducted by The Copenhagen Polis Centre for the Danish National Research Foundation by Mogens Herman Hansen,2005,page 340See also[edit]List of cities in ancient EpirusThis Ancient Greece related article is a stub
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