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Athena
Athena[Notes 2] or Athene,[Notes 3] often given the epithet Pallas,[Notes 4] is the ancient Greek goddess of wisdom, handicraft, and warfare,[1] who was later syncretized with the Roman goddess Minerva.[2] Athena
Athena
was regarded as the patron and protectress of various cities across Greece, particularly the city of Athens, from which she most likely received her name.[3] She is usually shown in art wearing a helmet and holding a spear. Her major symbols include owls, olive trees, snakes, and the Gorgoneion. From her origin as an Aegean palace goddess, Athena
Athena
was closely associated with the city. She was known as Polias and Poliouchos (both derived from polis, meaning "city-state"), and her temples were usually located atop the fortified Acropolis
Acropolis
in the central part of the city
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Pallas Athena (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Ersa
In Greek mythology, Ersa /ˈɜːrsə/ or Herse /ˈhɜːrˌsiː/ (Ancient Greek: Ἔρσα Érsa, Ἕρση Hérsē, literally "dew") is the goddess of dew and the daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and the Moon (Selene), sister of Pandia and half-sister to Endymion's 50 daughters.[1] Notes[edit]^ Keightley, p. 55; Hard, p. 46; Alcman, Fragment 57.References[edit]Hard, Robin, The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology: Based on H.J. Rose's "Handbook of Greek Mythology", Psychology Press, 2004, ISBN 9780415186360. Keightley, Thomas, The Mythology of Ancient Greece and Italy, G. Bell and Sons, 1877.External links[edit] The dictionary definition of Ersa at WiktionaryThis article relating to a Greek deity is a stub
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Sulis
In localised Celtic polytheism
Celtic polytheism
practised in Britain, Sulis
Sulis
was a deity worshipped at the thermal spring of Bath (now in Somerset)
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Armour
Armour
Armour
( British English
British English
or Canadian English) or armor (American English; see spelling differences) is a protective covering that is used to prevent damage from being inflicted to an object, individual or vehicle by direct contact weapons or projectiles, usually during combat, or from damage caused by a potentially dangerous environment or action (e.g., cycling, construction sites, etc.). Personal armour
Personal armour
is used to protect soldiers and war animals. Vehicle armour is used on warships and armoured fighting vehicles. A second use of the term armour describes armoured forces, armoured weapons, and their role in combat
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Helmets
A helmet is a form of protective gear worn to protect the head from injuries. More specifically, a helmet aids the skull in protecting the human brain. Ceremonial or symbolic helmets (e.g. UK policeman's helmet) without protective function are sometimes used. The oldest known use of helmets was by Assyrian soldiers
Assyrian soldiers
in 900 BC, who wore thick leather or bronze helmets to protect the head from blunt object and sword blows and arrow strikes in combat. Soldiers wear helmets, often made from lightweight plastic materials. In civilian life, helmets are used for recreational activities and sports (e.g. jockeys in horse racing, American football, ice hockey, cricket, baseball, camogie, hurling and rock climbing); dangerous work activities (e.g. construction, mining, riot police); and transportation (e.g. motorcycle helmets and bicycle helmets)
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Litae
Litae /ˈlaɪˌtiː/ (Greek: Λιταί meaning 'Prayers') are personifications in Greek mythology. They appear in Homer's Iliad
Iliad
in Book 9 as the lame and wrinkled daughters of Zeus
Zeus
(no mother named and no number given) who follow after Zeus' exiled daughter Até ('Folly') as healers but who cannot keep up with the fast-running Até. They bring great advantage to those who venerate them; but if someone dishonors them, then they go to Zeus
Zeus
and ask that Até be sent against that person.[1] This is an obvious allegory on the supposed power of prayer to mitigate the misfortunes into which one's folly has led one. References[edit]^ Homer, Iliad, 9. 502 ff; see also Quintus Smyrnaeus, Fall of Troy, 10
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Pandia
In Greek mythology, the goddess Pandia /ˌpænˈdaɪə/ or Pandeia (Greek: Πανδία, Πανδεία, meaning "all brightness")[1] was a daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and the goddess Selene, the Greek personification of the moon.[2] From the Homeric Hymn to Selene, we have: "Once the Son of Cronos [Zeus] was joined with her [Selene] in love; and she conceived and bare a daughter Pandia, exceeding lovely amongst the deathless gods."[3] An Athenian tradition made Pandia the wife of Antiochus, the eponymous hero of Antiochis, one of the ten Athenian tribes (phylai).[4] Originally Pandia may have been an epithet of Selene,[5] but by at least the time of the late Homeric Hymn, Pandia had become a daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Selene
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Aeacus
Aeacus
Aeacus
(/ˈiːəkəs/; also spelled Eacus; Ancient Greek: Αἰακός) was a mythological king of the island of Aegina
Aegina
in the Saronic Gulf
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Minos
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
Minos
Minos
(/ˈmaɪnɒs/ or /ˈmaɪnəs/; Greek: Μίνως, Minōs) was the first King of Crete, son of Zeus
Zeus
and Europa. Every nine years, he made King Aegeus
Aegeus
pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur
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Rhadamanthus
In Greek mythology, Rhadamanthus
Rhadamanthus
(/ˌrædəˈmænθəs/) or Rhadamanthys (Ancient Greek: Ῥαδάμανθυς) was a wise king of Crete
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Graces
In Greek mythology, a Charis (/ˈkeɪrɪs/; Greek: Χάρις, pronounced [kʰáris]) or Grace is one of three or more minor goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity, and fertility, together known as the Charites
Charites
/ˈkærɪtiːz/ (Χάριτες [kʰáritɛːs]) or Graces. The usual list, from youngest to oldest is Aglaea
Aglaea
("Splendor"), Euphrosyne ("Mirth"), and Thalia ("Good Cheer"). In Roman mythology
Roman mythology
they were known as the Gratiae, the "Graces". In some variants, Charis was one of the Graces and was not the singular form of their name. The Charites
Charites
were usually considered the daughters of Zeus
Zeus
and Eurynome, though they were also said to be daughters of Dionysus
Dionysus
and Aphrodite
Aphrodite
or of Helios
Helios
and the naiad Aegle
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Horae
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
the Horae
Horae
(/ˈhɔːriː/) or Horai (/ˈhɔːraɪ/) or Hours (Greek: Ὧραι, Hōrai, pronounced [hɔ̂ːraj], "Seasons") were the goddesses of the seasons and the natural portions of
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Angelos (Greek Mythology)
In Greek mythology, Angelos (Ancient Greek: Ἄγγελος) or Angelia (Ἀγγελία) was a daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Hera
Hera
who became known as a chthonic deity. Her story only survives in scholia on Theocritus' Idyll 2, and is as follows:Angelos was raised by nymphs to whose care her father had entrusted her. One day she stole her mother Hera's anointments and gave them away to Europe. To escape Hera's wrath, she had to hide first in the house of a woman in labor, and next among people who were carrying a dead man. Hera
Hera
eventually ceased from prosecuting her, and Zeus ordered the Cabeiroi
Cabeiroi
to cleanse Angelos. They performed the purification right in the waters of the Acherusia Lake in the Underworld
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Interpretatio Graeca
Interpretatio graeca
Interpretatio graeca
(Latin, "Greek translation" or "interpretation by means of Greek [models]") is a discourse[1] in which ancient Greek religious concepts and practices, deities, and myths are used to interpret or attempt to understand the mythology and religion of other cultures. It is thus a comparative methodology that looks for equivalencies and shared characteristics
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