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Athelstan
Æthelstan
Æthelstan
or Athelstan (Old English: Æþelstan,[a] or Æðelstān,[b] meaning "noble stone"; c. 894 – 27 October 939) was King of the Anglo-Saxons
King of the Anglo-Saxons
from 924 to 927 and King of the English from 927 to 939.[c] He was the son of King Edward the Elder
Edward the Elder
and his first wife, Ecgwynn. Modern historians regard him as the first King of England and one of the greatest Anglo-Saxon kings. He never married and had no children. He was succeeded by his half-brother, Edmund. When Edward died in July 924, Æthelstan
Æthelstan
was accepted by the Mercians as king. His half-brother Ælfweard may have been recognised as king in Wessex, but died within three weeks of their father's death. Æthelstan
Æthelstan
still encountered resistance in Wessex
Wessex
for several months, and was not crowned until September 925
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Kingdom Of Gwynedd
 United Kingdom ∟ Wales^ In Latin, Gwynedd
Gwynedd
was often referred to in official medieval charters and acts of the 13th century as Principatus Norwallia (Principality of North Wales).The Principality or Kingdom of Gwynedd
Gwynedd
(Medieval Latin: Venedotia or Norwallia; Middle Welsh: Guynet,[4]) was one of several successor states to the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
that emerged in sub-Roman Britain in the 5th century during the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain. Based in northwest Wales, the rulers of Gwynedd
Gwynedd
repeatedly rose to preeminence and were acclaimed as "King of the Britons" before losing their power in civil wars or invasions
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Æthelred Of Wessex
Æthelred I (Old English: Æþelræd, sometimes rendered as Ethelred, "noble counsel"; c. 847[a] – 871) was King of Wessex
King of Wessex
from 865 to 871. He was the fourth son of King Æthelwulf
Æthelwulf
of Wessex. He succeeded his brother, Æthelberht (Ethelbert), as King of Wessex
King of Wessex
and Kent
Kent
in 865.[3][4]Contents1 Early life 2 Reign 3 Family 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Citations 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit]Coin of King ÆthelredIn 853 his younger brother Alfred went to Rome, and according to contemporary references in the Liber Vitae of San Salvatore, Brescia, Æthelred accompanied him.[5] He first witnessed his father's charters as an Ætheling
Ætheling
in 854, and kept this title until he succeeded to the throne in 865
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Cuthbert Of Lindisfarne
The Holy Island of Lindisfarne, also known simply as Holy Island,[2] is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England, which constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumberland.[3] Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD; it was an important centre of Celtic Christianity
Celtic Christianity
under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne
Eadfrith of Lindisfarne
and Eadberht of Lindisfarne. After the Viking
Viking
invasions and the Norman conquest of England, a priory was reestablished
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Benedictine
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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Kingdom Of East Anglia
The Kingdom of the East Angles (Old English: Ēast Engla Rīce; Latin: Regnum Orientalium Anglorum), today known as the Kingdom of East Anglia, was a small independent kingdom of the Angles comprising what are now the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk and perhaps the eastern part of the Fens.[1] The kingdom formed in the 6th century in the wake of the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain. It was ruled by the Wuffingas in the 7th and 8th centuries, but fell to Mercia in 794, and was conquered by the Danes in 869, forming part of the Danelaw
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Egbert Of Wessex
Ecgberht (771/775 – 839), also spelled Egbert, Ecgbert, or Ecgbriht, was King of Wessex
King of Wessex
from 802 until his death in 839. His father was Ealhmund of Kent. In the 780s Ecgberht was forced into exile by Offa of Mercia
Mercia
and Beorhtric of Wessex, but on Beorhtric's death in 802 Ecgberht returned and took the throne. Little is known of the first 20 years of Ecgberht's reign, but it is thought that he was able to maintain the independence of Wessex against the kingdom of Mercia, which at that time dominated the other southern English kingdoms. In 825 Ecgberht defeated Beornwulf of Mercia, ended Mercia's supremacy at the Battle of Ellandun, and proceeded to take control of the Mercian dependencies in southeastern England. In 829 he defeated Wiglaf of Mercia
Mercia
and drove him out of his kingdom, temporarily ruling Mercia
Mercia
directly
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Great Heathen Army
The Great Viking Army or Great Danish[a] Army, known by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
as the Great Heathen Army
Great Heathen Army
(OE: mycel hæþen here), was a coalition of Norse warriors, primarily originating from Denmark
Denmark
but with elements from Sweden and Norway, who came together under a unified command to invade the four Anglo-Saxon kingdoms that constituted England in AD 865. Since the late 8th century, the Vikings had settled for mainly "hit-and-run" raids on centres of wealth, such as monasteries. However, the intent of the Great Army was different. It was much larger and its purpose was to conquer. The name Great Heathen Army
Great Heathen Army
is derived from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 865
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Guthrum
Guthrum
Guthrum
or Guðrum (died c. 890), christened Æthelstan on his conversion to Christianity in 878, was King of the Danish Vikings in the Danelaw
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Æthelwold Of Wessex
Æthelwold or Æthelwald (died 902 or 903)[a] was the younger of two known sons of Æthelred I, King of Wessex
Wessex
from 865 to 871. Because Æthelwold ætheling
Æthelwold ætheling
and his brother were still infants when their father the king died while fighting a Danish Viking
Viking
invasion, the throne passed to the king's younger brother (and Æthelwold's uncle) Alfred the Great, who carried on the war against the Vikings and won a crucial victory at the Battle of Edington
Battle of Edington
in 878. After Alfred's death in 899, Æthelwold disputed the throne with Alfred's son, Edward the Elder. As senior ætheling (prince of the royal dynasty eligible for kingship), Æthelwold had a strong claim to the throne
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Battle Of The Holme
Coordinates: 52°28′33″N 0°14′33″W / 52.47588°N 0.242472°W / 52.47588; -0.242472 The Battle of the Holme took place in East Anglia
East Anglia
on 13 December 902 between the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
men of Kent
Kent
and the East Anglian Danes.[1] Its location is unknown but may have been Holme in Huntingdonshire
Huntingdonshire
(now part of Cambridgeshire).[2] Following the death of Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
in 899, his son Edward the Elder became king, but his cousin Æthelwold, the son of Alfred's elder brother, King Æthelred, claimed the throne
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Viking
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
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Battle Of Tettenhall
The Battle of Tettenhall
Tettenhall
(sometimes called the Battle of Wednesfield or Wōdnesfeld) took place, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, near Tettenhall
Tettenhall
on 5 August 910
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Ælfwynn
Ælfwynn
Ælfwynn
was the ruler of Mercia
Mercia
for a few months in 918, following her mother's death. She was the daughter of Æthelred, ruler of English Mercia, and Æthelflæd
Æthelflæd
(styled The Lady of Mercia). Following the death of her mother on 12 June 918, Ælfwynn
Ælfwynn
was for a short time ruler of Mercia. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
states that she was "deprived of all control in Mercia, and was led into Wessex
Wessex
three weeks before Christmas". Ælfwynn's parents may have married as early as 882 and not later than 887. According to William of Malmesbury, Ælfwynn
Ælfwynn
was the only child of Æthelflæd
Æthelflæd
and Æthelred. The date of her birth is nowhere recorded, but it is presumed that she was born soon after her parents' marriage, perhaps around 888
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Humber
The Humber
Humber
/ˈhʌmbər/ is a large tidal estuary on the east coast of Northern England. It is formed at Trent Falls, Faxfleet, by the confluence of the tidal rivers Ouse and Trent
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Sitric Cáech
Sitric Cáech
Sitric Cáech
or Sihtric Cáech or Sigtrygg Gále,[nb 1] (Old Norse: Sigtryggr, Old English: Sihtric, died 927) was a Viking[nb 2] leader who ruled Dublin
Dublin
and then Viking
Viking
Northumbria
Northumbria
in the early 10th century. He was a grandson of Ímar
Ímar
and a member of the Uí Ímair. Sitric was most probably among those Vikings
Vikings
expelled from Dublin
Dublin
in 902, whereafter he may have ruled territory in the eastern Danelaw
Danelaw
in England
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