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Atari Lynx
The Atari
Atari
Lynx is an 16-bit handheld game console that was released by Atari Corporation
Atari Corporation
in September 1989 in North America, and in Europe and Japan in 1990. It was the world's first handheld electronic game with a color LCD. It was also notable for its advanced graphics and ambidextrous layout. The Lynx competed with the Game Boy
Game Boy
(released two months earlier), as well as the Game Gear
Game Gear
and TurboExpress, both released the following year. It was discontinued in 1995.Contents1 History1.1 Lynx II2 Features 3 Reception 4 After Atari 5 Technical specifications 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Lynx was the second handheld game system to be released with the Atari
Atari
name. The first was Atari
Atari
Inc.'s handheld electronic game Touch Me. Atari
Atari
Inc
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Kilobyte
The kilobyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) defines the prefix kilo as 1000 (103); per this definition, one kilobyte is 1000 bytes.[1] The internationally recommended unit symbol for the kilobyte is kB.[1] In some areas of information technology, particularly in reference to digital memory capacity, kilobyte instead denotes 1024 (210) bytes. This arises from the powers-of-two sizing common to memory circuit design. In this context, the symbols K and KB are often used.Contents1 Definitions and usage1.1 1000 bytes 1.2 1024 bytes1.2.1 Kibibyte2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDefinitions and usage[edit] 1000 bytes[edit] In the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) the prefix kilo means 1000 (103); therefore, one kilobyte is 1000 bytes
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Blitter
A blitter is a circuit, sometimes as a coprocessor or a logic block on a microprocessor, dedicated to the rapid movement and modification of data within a computer's memory. A blitter can copy large quantities of data from one memory area to another relatively quickly, and in parallel with the CPU, while freeing up the CPU's more complex capabilities for other operations. A typical use for a blitter is the movement of a bitmap, such as windows and fonts in a graphical user interface or images and backgrounds in a 2D computer game
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Sega
Sega
Sega
Games Co., Ltd. (Japanese: 株式会社セガゲームス, Hepburn: Kabushiki gaisha
Kabushiki gaisha
Sega
Sega
Gēmusu), originally short for Service Games and officially styled as SEGA, is a Japanese multinational video game developer and publisher headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, with offices around the world. Sega
Sega
developed and manufactured numerous home video game consoles from 1983 to 2001, but after financial losses incurred from its Dreamcast
Dreamcast
console, the company restructured to focus on providing software as a third-party developer
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Commodore Business Machines
Commodore
Commodore
generally refers to Commodore
Commodore
(rank), a naval rank
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Associated Press
The Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association. The AP is owned by its contributing newspapers and radio and television stations in the United States, all of which contribute stories to the AP and use material written by its staff journalists. AP's mission is to inform the world with accurate, fair, unbiased reporting. Its Statement of News Values and Principles[3] spells out its standards and practices. AP has earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes, including 31 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. AP has counted the vote in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures
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Tetris (Game Boy)
Tetris (テトリス, Tetorisu) is a puzzle video game for the Game Boy released in 1989. It is a portable version of Alexey Pajitnov's original Tetris and it was bundled in the North American and European releases of the Game Boy itself. It was the first game compatible with the Game Link Cable, a pack-in accessory that allowed two Game Boys to link together for multiplayer purposes. A colorized remake of the game was released on the Game Boy Color entitled Tetris DX (テトリス デラックス, Tetorisu Derakkusu). A Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console version of Tetris was released in December 2011 and lacks the multiplayer functionality
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Game (retailer)
Game Digital plc is the parent company of Game Retail Limited, a British video game company that trades under the Game brand, stylised as GAME. The company's origins lie in the founding of the Rhino Group by Terry Norris and Bev Ripley in 1991
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Graphics Processing Unit
A graphics processing unit (GPU) is a specialized electronic circuit designed to rapidly manipulate and alter memory to accelerate the creation of images in a frame buffer intended for output to a display device. GPUs are used in embedded systems, mobile phones, personal computers, workstations, and game consoles. Modern GPUs are very efficient at manipulating computer graphics and image processing, and their highly parallel structure makes them more efficient than general-purpose CPUs for algorithms where the processing of large blocks of data is done in parallel
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Sprite (computer Graphics)
In computer graphics, a sprite is a two-dimensional bitmap that is integrated into a larger scene. Originally sprites referred to independent objects that are composited together, by hardware, with other elements such as a background.[1] This occurs as each scan line is prepared for the video output device, such as a CRT, without involvement of the main CPU and without the need for a full-screen frame buffer.[1] Sprites can be positioned or altered by setting attributes used during the hardware composition process
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Pseudo-3D
Two and a half dimensional (shortened to 2.5D, known alternatively as three-quarter perspective and pseudo-3D) is a term used to describe either 2D graphical projections and similar techniques used to cause images or scenes to simulate the appearance of being three-dimensional (3D) when in fact they are not, or gameplay in an otherwise three-dimensional video game that is restricted to a two-dimensional plane or has a virtual camera with a fixed angle
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Consumer Electronics Show
CES (formerly an acronym for Consumer Electronics Show
Consumer Electronics Show
but now the official name[1]) is an annual trade show organized by the Consumer Technology Association. Held in January at the Las Vegas
Las Vegas
Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, the event typically hosts presentations of new products and technologies in the consumer electronics industry.Contents1 History 2 Show highlights2.1 1967 2.2 1970 2.3 1982 2.4 1993 2.5 2002 2.6 2004 2.7 2005 2.8 2006 2.9 2007 2.10 2008 2.11 2009 2.12 2010 2.13 2011 2.14 2012 2.15 2013 2.16 2014 2.17 2015 2.18 2016 2.19 2017 2.20 20183 "Booth babes" controversy 4 Reception 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The first CES was held in June 1967 in New York City. It was a spinoff from the Chicago
Chicago
Music Show, which until then had served as the main event for exhibiting consumer electronics
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Mode 7
Mode 7 is a graphics mode on the Super NES video game console that allows a background layer to be rotated and scaled on a scanline-by-scanline basis to create many different effects.[1] The most famous of these effects is the application of a perspective effect on a background layer by scaling and rotating the background layer in this manner. This transforms the background layer into a two-dimensional horizontal texture-mapped plane that trades height for depth
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Dragon (magazine)
Dragon is one of the two official magazines for source material for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game and associated products; Dungeon is the other. TSR, Inc.
TSR, Inc.
originally launched the monthly printed magazine in 1976 to succeed the company's earlier publication, The Strategic Review. The final printed issue was #359 in September 2007.[1][2] Shortly after the last print issue shipped in mid-August 2007, Wizards of the Coast (part of Hasbro, Inc.), the publication's current copyright holder, relaunched Dragon as an online magazine, continuing on the numbering of the print edition. The last published issue was No. 430 in December 2013. A digital publication called Dragon+, which replaces the Dragon magazine, launched in 2015.[3] It is created by Dialect in collaboration with Wizards of the Coast, and restarted the numbering system for issues at No
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription. The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text
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Retrogaming
Retrogaming, also known as classic gaming and old school gaming, is the playing or collecting of older personal computer, console, and arcade video games in contemporary times. Usually retrogaming is based upon systems that are obsolete or discontinued. Retrogaming
Retrogaming
has three main activities; vintage retrogaming, retrogaming emulation, and ported retrogaming. Vintage retrogaming includes games that are played on the original hardware. Emulation involves newer systems simulating old gaming systems, while ported retrogaming allows games to be played on modern hardware via ports or compilations
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