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Atari Flashback 2
The Atari
Atari
Flashback is a series of dedicated consoles marketed by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
from 2004 to 2011. Since 2011, the consoles have been produced and marketed by AtGames under license from Atari
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Haunted House (video Game)
Haunted House is an Atari 2600
Atari 2600
video game written by James Andreasen[1] and published by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
in February 1982.[2] The player, represented by a pair of eyes, must navigate the haunted mansion of the late Zachary Graves to recover the three pieces of an urn. The game has been identified as one of the earliest examples of the survival horror genre by a GameSpy article.[4]Contents1 Gameplay 2 Reception 3 Legacy 4 ReferencesGameplay[edit]Haunted House on the Atari
Atari
2600The house has three floors and a basement. The player's character may pick up only one of three items at a time (a key to open doors, a sceptre to ward off evil spirits, or the urn) and must avoid a bat, a tarantula, and the ghost of Mr. Graves himself. If the player is hit by the monsters nine times, the game ends
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Pong
Pong
Pong
is one of the earliest arcade video games. It is a table tennis sports game featuring simple two-dimensional graphics. The game was originally manufactured by Atari, which released it in 1972. Allan Alcorn created Pong
Pong
as a training exercise assigned to him by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell. Bushnell based the idea on an electronic ping-pong game included in the Magnavox
Magnavox
Odyssey, which later resulted in a lawsuit against Atari. Surprised by the quality of Alcorn's work, Bushnell and Atari
Atari
co-founder Ted Dabney decided to manufacture the game. Pong
Pong
quickly became a success and was the first commercially successful video game, which helped to establish the video game industry along with the first home console, the Magnavox
Magnavox
Odyssey
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Crystal Castles (video Game)
Crystal Castles is an arcade game released by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
in 1983.[1] The player controls the character Bentley Bear who has to collect gems located throughout trimetric-projected rendered castles while avoiding enemies out to get him as well as the gems. Crystal Castles is notable for being one of the first arcade action games with an actual ending, whereas most games of the time either continued indefinitely, ended in what was termed a kill screen or simply just restarted from the first level,[2] and to contain advance warp zones.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Development 3 Ports 4 Championships 5 Legacy 6 References 7 External linksGameplay[edit]Screenshot of the original arcade version of Crystal CastlesScreenshot of the Commodore 64
Commodore 64
versionCrystal Castles has nine levels with four castles each, and a tenth level which features a single castle — the clearing of which ends the game
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Gravitar
Gravitar
Gravitar
is a color vector graphics arcade game released by Atari, Inc. in 1982. Using the same rotate-and-thrust controls as Asteroids, Gravitar
Gravitar
was known for its difficulty.[2] It was the first of over twenty games Mike Hally designed and produced for Atari, including Star Wars. The main programmer was Rich Adam and the cabinet art was designed by Brad Chaboya. Over 5,427 cabinets were produced.[3] An Atari 2600
Atari 2600
version by Dan Hitchens was published by Atari in 1983.[1] Gravitar
Gravitar
was developed with a working title of Lunar Battle.[4]Contents1 Gameplay 2 Ports and re-releases 3 Legacy 4 Records 5 References 6 External linksGameplay[edit] The player controls a small blue spacecraft. The game starts in a fictional solar system with several planets to explore. If the player moves his ship into a planet, he will be taken to a side-view landscape
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Lunar Lander (arcade Game)
Lunar Lander is a single-player arcade game in the Lunar Lander subgenre. It was developed by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
and released in August 1979. In the game, the player controls a lunar landing module as viewed from the side and attempts to land safely on the Moon. The player burns fuel points to rotate the module and fires a thruster to counteract gravity, earning points based on the skillfulness and difficulty of the landing. The game resets the module after every successful landing or crash with a new landing terrain and ends when the player runs out of fuel. Players can insert more coins at any time to buy more fuel, allowing for potentially indefinite gameplay. Development of the game began with the creation of a vector graphics engine by Atari after the release of the 1978 Cinematronics
Cinematronics
game Space Wars
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Millipede (arcade Game)
Millipede
Millipede
is a 1982 arcade game by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
and is the sequel to the arcade hit, Centipede, with more gameplay variety and a wider array of insects than the original. The objective is to score as many points as possible by destroying all segments of the millipede as it moves toward the bottom of the screen, as well as destroying and avoiding other enemies. The game is played with a trackball and a single fire button, which can be held down for rapid-fire. The game is over when the player's last life is lost. Millipede
Millipede
was ported to the Atari 2600, Atari 8-bit family, Atari ST, and later the Nintendo Entertainment System.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Re-releases 3 Highest scores 4 References 5 External linksGameplay[edit]Screenshot of MillipedeSimilar to Centipede, the object of the game is to destroy a millipede that advances downward from the top of the screen
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Sky Diver
Sky Diver
Sky Diver
is an arcade video game designed by Owen Rubin, and released by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
in 1978. It was ported to Atari 2600
Atari 2600
in 1979 by Jim Huether.[1] Its interface is a simple third-person view of a parachuting drop zone. Sky Diver
Sky Diver
is a two-player game, although one player can play.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Ports 3 References 4 External linksGameplay[edit] The object of Sky Diver
Sky Diver
is to jump out of a plane, release a parachute and land on the landing pad. To get higher points, the player must release the parachute closer to the ground. The player has nine jumps. If the landing pad is missed, the player loses points
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Solaris (Atari 2600)
Solaris is a game for the Atari 2600
Atari 2600
published in 1986 by Atari.[1] The game was programmed by Doug Neubauer, who owns the copyright to the game and the Solaris trademark. Solaris is a sequel to Neubauer's Star Raiders,[2]. Both games feature an enemy race known as "Zylons." Solaris was at one point going to be based on The Last Starfighter, while the Atari
Atari
8-bit version of The Last Starfighter
The Last Starfighter
was renamed Star Raiders 2.[citation needed] Gameplay[edit] The galaxy of Solaris is made up of 16 quadrants, each containing 48 sectors. The game has 3 distinct environments:The tactical map, in which the player navigates through the quadrant and chooses which enemy to fight. Space battle ensues whenever the player navigates into a hostile battlegroup via the tactical map The player may also descend to planets
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Warlords (1980 Video Game)
Warlords is an arcade game released by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
in 1980.[3] The game resembles a combination of Breakout and Quadrapong
Quadrapong
(an early Atari arcade game) in the sense that not only can up to 4 players play the game at the same time, but also the "castles" in the four corners of the screen are brick walls that could be broken with a flaming ball. Warlords uses spinner controllers for player control, and came in both an upright 2 player version and a 4 player cocktail version. The upright version uses a black and white monitor, and reflects the game image onto a mirror, with a backdrop of castles, giving the game a 3D feel. The upright version only supports up to two simultaneous players, which move through the levels as a team. The cocktail version is in color, and supports 1-4 players. 3-4 player games are free-for-all's where the game ends as soon as one player wins
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Centipede (arcade Game)
Centipede
Centipede
is a vertically oriented fixed shooter arcade game produced by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
in 1980. The game was designed by Ed Logg
Ed Logg
and Dona Bailey. It was one of the most commercially successful games from the video arcade's golden age. The player fights off centipedes, spiders, scorpions and fleas, completing a round after eliminating the centipede that winds down the playing field. Centipede
Centipede
was ported to Atari's own Atari
Atari
2600, Atari
Atari
5200, Atari 7800, and Atari
Atari
8-bit family. Under the Atarisoft
Atarisoft
label, the game was sold for the Apple II, Commodore 64, ColecoVision, VIC-20, IBM PC
IBM PC
(as a PC booter), Intellivision, and TI-99/4A
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Assembly Language
An assembly (or assembler) language,[1] often abbreviated asm, is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device, in which there is a very strong (but often not one-to-one) correspondence between the language and the architecture's machine code instructions. Each assembly language is specific to a particular computer architecture. In contrast, most high-level programming languages are generally portable across multiple architectures but require interpreting or compiling. Assembly language
Assembly language
may also be called symbolic machine code.[2] Assembly language
Assembly language
is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler. The conversion process is referred to as assembly, or assembling the source code
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Food Fight (video Game)
Food Fight (also styled as Charley Chuck's Food Fight)[1] is an arcade game released by Atari, Inc.
Atari, Inc.
in March 1983.[2] The player guides Charley Chuck, who is trying to eat an ice cream cone before it melts, while avoiding four chefs bent on stopping him. The game sold 1,951 video game arcade cabinets.[2] Food Fight was ported to the Atari 7800
Atari 7800
console in 1987,[3] and also released as an Atari 8-bit family
Atari 8-bit family
cartridge styled for the then new Atari XEGS
Atari XEGS
the same year. A port for the Atari 2600
Atari 2600
was canceled.[4]Contents1 Gameplay 2 Development 3 World records 4 Clones 5 References 6 External linksGameplay[edit]Gameplay screenshotIn Food Fight, the player controls a young boy named Charley Chuck. The object of the game is to eat an ice cream cone located on the opposite side of an open playfield
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History Of Video Game Consoles (second Generation)
The second generation of computer and video games began in 1976 with the release of the Fairchild Channel F
Fairchild Channel F
and Radofin Electronics' 1292 Advanced Programmable Video System. It coincided with and was partly fuelled by the golden age of arcade video games, a peak era of popularity and innovation for the medium. The early period saw the launch of several consoles as various companies decided to enter the market; later releases were in direct response to the earlier consoles. The Atari 2600
Atari 2600
was the dominant console for much of the second generation, with other consoles such as Intellivision, the Odyssey², and ColecoVision
ColecoVision
also enjoying market share. The second generation had a mixed legacy affected by the video game crash of 1983. The Atari 2600
Atari 2600
was discontinued on January 1, 1992, ending the second generation
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Sprites (computer Graphics)
In computer graphics, a sprite is a two-dimensional bitmap that is integrated into a larger scene. Originally sprites referred to independent objects that are composited together, by hardware, with other elements such as a background.[1] This occurs as each scan line is prepared for the video output device, such as a CRT, without involvement of the main CPU and without the need for a full-screen frame buffer.[1] Sprites can be positioned or altered by setting attributes used during the hardware composition process
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Homebrew (video Games)
Homebrew is a term frequently applied to video games or other software produced by consumers to target proprietary hardware platforms (usually with hardware restrictions) not typically user-programmable or that use proprietary storage methods. This can include games developed with official development kits, such as Net Yaroze, Linux for PlayStation
PlayStation
2 or Microsoft
Microsoft
XNA.[1] A game written by a non-professional developer for a system intended to be consumer-programmable, like the Commodore 64, is simply called hobbyist (rather than homebrew). Along with the Dreamcast, Game Boy Advance, and PlayStation
PlayStation
Portable, the most frequently used platforms for homebrew development are older generations of consoles, among them the Atari 2600
Atari 2600
and Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)
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