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Atalanti
Atalanti
Atalanti
(Greek: Αταλάντη Atalantē) is the second largest town in Phthiotis, Greece. It is located southeast of Lamia, north of Livadeia
Livadeia
and northwest of Chalcis
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Stockbreeding
Animal husbandry
Animal husbandry
is the branch of agriculture concerned with animals that are raised for meat, fibre, milk, eggs, or other products. It includes day-to-day care, selective breeding and the raising of livestock. Husbandry has a long history, starting with the Neolithic revolution when animals were first domesticated, from around 13,000 BC onwards, antedating farming of the first crops
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Trojan War
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
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Magnesium
Magnesium
Magnesium
is a chemical element with symbol Mg and atomic number 12. It is a shiny gray solid which bears a close physical resemblance to the other five elements in the second column (group 2, or alkaline earth metals) of the periodic table: all group 2 elements have the same electron configuration in the outer electron shell and a similar crystal structure. Magnesium
Magnesium
is the ninth most abundant element in the universe.[4][5] It is produced in large, aging stars from the sequential addition of three helium nuclei to a carbon nucleus. When such stars explode as supernovas, much of the magnesium is expelled into the interstellar medium where it may recycle into new star systems
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Iron
Iron
Iron
is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth
Earth
is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust
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Tragana
Tragana is a town in Messenia in Greece. An early Bronze age cremation was found there.[1] References[edit]^ Anthony M. Snodgrass (2000), The Dark Age of Greece: An Archaeological Survey of the Eleventh to the Eighth Centuries BC, Taylor & Francis, p. 172, ISBN 9780415936361 Coordinates: 37°00′25″N 21°40′05″E / 37.007°N 21.668°E / 37.007; 21.668This Greece-related article is a stub
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Opus, Greece
Opus[pronunciation?] or Opous (Ancient Greek: Ὀποῦς) in Ancient Greece was the chief city of Opuntian or Eastern Locris. It was located on the coast of mainland Greece opposite Euboea, perhaps at modern Atalandi. Its harbor was at Kynos. In the Iliad, Homer mentions Opus as one of the Locrian cities whose troops were led by Ajax the Lesser, son of Oileus the king of Locris (Homer, Iliad, 2.525–530). There were games called Aiantea and an altar at Opus in honor of Ajax.[1] Pindar's ninth Olympian ode, concerns Opus. Opus fought on the Greek side at Thermopylae, but surrendered, joining the Persians, and on the Spartan side during the Peloponnesian War. In 198 BC, during the Second Macedonian War they went over to the Romans. References[edit]^  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Opus". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. Smith, William, "Opus" in Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LLD. London
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Hesiodus
Hesiod (/ˈhiːsiəd/ or /ˈhɛsiəd/;[1] Greek: Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.[2][3] He is generally regarded as the first written poet in the Western tradition to regard himself as an individual persona with an active role to play in his subject.[4] Ancient authors credited Hesiod and Homer with establishing Greek religious customs.[5] Modern scholars refer to him as a major source on Greek mythology, farming techniques, early economic thought (he is sometimes considered history's first economist),[6] archaic Greek astronomy and ancient time-keeping.Contents1 Life1.1 Dating2 Works2.1 Theogony 2.2 Works and Days 2.3 Other writings3 Reception3.1 Portrait bust4 Hesiod's Greek 5 Notes 6 Citations 7 References 8 Further reading8.1 Selected translations9 External linksLife[edit] The dating of Hesi
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Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
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Deucalion
Deucalion
Deucalion
(/djuːˈkeɪliən/; Greek: Δευκαλίων) was the son of Prometheus; ancient sources name his mother as Clymene, Hesione, or Pronoia.[1] He is closely connected with the flood myth.Contents1 Etymology 2 In ancient Greek mythography2.1 Family 2.2 Deluge accounts 2.3 Variant stories 2.4 Mosaic accretions 2.5 Dating by early scholars3 Deucalionids 4 References 5 Primary sources 6 External linksEtymology[edit] According to folk etymology, Deucalion's name comes from δεῦκος, deukos, a variant of γλεῦκος, gleucos, i.e. "sweet new wine, must, sweetness"[2][3] and ἁλιεύς, haliéus, i.e
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Pyrrha
In Greek mythology, Pyrrha
Pyrrha
(/ˈpɪrə/; Greek: Πύρρα) was the daughter of Epimetheus and Pandora
Pandora
and wife of Deucalion
Deucalion
of whom she had three sons, Hellen, Amphictyon, Orestheus; and three daughters Protogeneia, Pandora
Pandora
II and Thyia. According to some accounts, Hellen was credited to be born from Pyrrha's union with Zeus.[1] Etymology[edit] In Latin
Latin
the word pyrrhus means red from the Greek adjective πυρρός, purrhos, i.e. "flame coloured", "the colour of fire" or simply "red" or "reddish".[2] Pyrrha
Pyrrha
was evidently named after her red hair. Horace
Horace
(Ode, i
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Locrians
The Locrians
Locrians
(Greek: Λοκροί, Locri) were an ancient Greek tribe that inhabited the region of Locris
Locris
in Central Greece, around Parnassus. They spoke the Locrian dialect, a Doric-Northwest dialect, and were closely related to their neighbouring tribes, the Phocians and the Dorians. They were divided into two geographically distinct tribes, the western Ozolians and the eastern Opuntians; their primary towns were Amphissa and Opus respectively, and their most important colony was the city of Epizephyrian Locris
Locris
in Magna Graecia, which still bears the name "Locri"
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Ajax The Lesser
Ajax (Ancient Greek: Αἴας Aias) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. He was called the "lesser" or "Locrian" Ajax,[1] to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He was the leader of the Locrian contingent during the Trojan War. He is a significant figure in Homer's Iliad
Iliad
and is also mentioned in the Odyssey,[2] in Virgil's Aeneid
Aeneid
and in Euripides' The Trojan Women. In Etruscan legend, he was known as Aivas Vilates.Contents1 Life 2 Death 3 Art 4 References 5 SourcesLife[edit] Ajax's mother's name was Eriopis. According to Strabo, he was born in Naryx in Locris,[3] where Ovid
Ovid
calls him Narycius Heroes.[4] According to the Iliad,[5] he led his Locrians
Locrians
in forty ships against Troy.[6] He is described as one of the great heroes among the Greeks
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Troy
Troy
Troy
(Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias and Ἴλιον, Ilion or Ἴλιος, Ilios; Latin: Troia and Ilium;[note 1] Hittite: Wilusha or Truwisha;[1][2] Turkish: Truva or Troya) was a city situated in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia
Anatolia
in modern Turkey, near (just south of) the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War
Trojan War
described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer
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Patroclus
In Greek mythology, as recorded in Homer's Iliad, Patroclus (/pəˈtroʊkləs, pəˈtrɒkləs/; Greek: Πάτροκλος; "glory of the father") was the son of Menoetius, grandson of Actor, King of Opus.Contents1 Life and death 2 Relationship with Achilles 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife and death[edit] According to Hyginus, Patroclus
Patroclus
is the child of Menoetius and Philomela.[1] Homer
Homer
also references Menoetius as the individual who gave Patroclus
Patroclus
to Peleus.[2] Menoetius is the son of Actor, King of Opus in Locris by Aegina.[3] Aegina was a daughter of Asopus and mother of Aeacus by Zeus. Aeacus was father of Peleus, Telamon and Phocus. Actor was a son of Deioneus, King of Phocis and Diomede. His paternal grandparents were Aeolus of Thessaly and Enarete
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