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Atafu
Atafu, formerly known as the Duke of York Group, is a group of 42 coral islets within Tokelau
Tokelau
in the south Pacific Ocean, 500 kilometres (310 miles) north of Samoa.[1] Covering 2.5 square kilometres (1.0 square mile), it is the smallest of the three islands that constitute Tokelau, and is composed of an atoll surrounding a central lagoon, which itself covers some 15 km2. The atoll lies some 800 kilometres (500 miles) south of the equator at 8° 35' South, 172° 30' West.Contents1 Population 2 Geography2.1 Islets3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPopulation[edit] According to the 2016 census 541 people officially live on Atafu (however just 413 were present at census night).[2] Of those present, 78% belong to the Congregational Church.[3] The main settlement on the atoll is located on Atafu
Atafu
Island at the northwestern corner of the atoll
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Islet
An islet is a very small island.Contents1 Types 2 Synonymous terms 3 In international law 4 List of islets 5 Notes 6 ReferencesTypes[edit]Danes on the islet Danmark in Norway
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John Byron
Seven Years' WarBattle of RestigoucheAmerican War of IndependenceBattle of GrenadaVice-Admiral The Hon. John Byron
John Byron
(8 November 1723 – 10 April 1786) was a British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
officer and politician. He was known as Foul-weather Jack because of his frequent encounters with bad weather at sea. As a midshipman, he sailed in the squadron under George Anson on his voyage around the world, though Byron made it only to southern Chile, where his ship was wrecked. He returned to England with the captain of HMS Wager. He was governor of Newfoundland following Hugh Palliser, who left in 1768. He circumnavigated the world as a commodore with his own squadron in 1764-1766. He fought in battles in The Seven Years' War
Seven Years' War
and the American Revolution
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Radio New Zealand International
This article is about RNZ's international radio channel. For its domestic channel, see Radio New Zealand
New Zealand
National. RNZ International
RNZ International
or Radio New Zealand
New Zealand
International (Māori: Ko Te Reo Irirangi o Aotearoa Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa), sometimes abbreviated to RNZI, is a division of Radio New Zealand
New Zealand
and the official international broadcasting station of New Zealand. It broadcasts a variety of news, current affairs and sports programmes in English and news in seven Pacific languages. The station's mission statement requires it to promote and reflect New Zealand
New Zealand
in the Pacific, and better relations between New Zealand
New Zealand
and Pacific countries. As the only shortwave radio station in New Zealand, RNZ International broadcasts to several island nations
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The Dominion Post (Wellington)
The Dominion Post is a metropolitan broadsheet morning newspaper published in Wellington, New Zealand, owned by the Australian Fairfax group, owners of The Age, Melbourne, and The Sydney Morning Herald. Foundation[edit] The Dominion Post was created in July 2002 by Independent Newspapers Limited (INL), by amalgamating two existing Wellington
Wellington
broadsheet newspapers; The Dominion a morning paper, that commenced on Dominion Day, 26 September 1907; and The Evening Post, an evening, that commenced on 8 February 1865
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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American Samoa
American Samoa
Samoa
(/əˌmɛrɪkən səˈmoʊ.ə, -sɑː-/ ( listen); Samoan: Amerika Sāmoa, [aˈmɛɾika ˈsaːmʊa]; also Amelika Sāmoa or Sāmoa Amelika) is an unincorporated territory of the United States
United States
located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of Samoa.[5] American Samoa
Samoa
consists of five main islands and two coral atolls. The largest and most populous island is Tutuila, with the Manuʻa Islands, Rose Atoll, and Swains Island
Swains Island
also included in the territory. All islands except for Swains Island
Swains Island
are part of the Samoan Islands, located west of the Cook Islands, north of Tonga, and some 300 miles (500 km) south of Tokelau
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Maritime Boundary
A maritime boundary is a conceptual division of the Earth's water surface areas using physiographic or geopolitical criteria. As such, it usually bounds areas of exclusive national rights over mineral and biological resources,[1] encompassing maritime features, limits and zones.[2] Generally, a maritime boundary is delineated at a particular distance from a jurisdiction's coastline. Although in some countries the term maritime boundary represents borders of a maritime nation[3] that are recognized by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, maritime borders usually serve to identify the edge of international waters. Maritime boundaries exist in the context of territorial waters, contiguous zones, and exclusive economic zones; however, the terminology does not encompass lake or river boundaries, which are considered within the context of land boundaries. Some maritime boundaries have remained indeterminate despite efforts to clarify them
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HMS Dolphin (1751)
HMS Dolphin was a 24-gun sixth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy. Launched in 1751, she was used as a survey ship from 1764 and made two circumnavigations of the world under the successive commands of John Byron and Samuel Wallis. She was the first ship to circumnavigate the world twice. She remained in service until she was paid off in September 1776, and she was broken up in early 1777.[1]Contents1 Construction 2 Early service 3 First circumnavigation 4 Second circumnavigation 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksConstruction[edit] Built to the 1745 Establishment, Dolphin was originally ordered from the private yard of Earlsman Sparrow in Rotherhithe (under contract dated 7 October 1747). Following Sparrow's bankruptcy in 1748, the order was moved to Woolwich Dockyard
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Polynesians
The Polynesian people consist of various ethnic groups that speak Polynesian languages, a branch of the Oceanic languages, and inhabit Polynesia. The native Polynesian people of New Zealand
New Zealand
and Hawaii
Hawaii
are minorities in their homelands.Contents1 Origins 2 People 3 Physical characteristics 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigins[edit] See also: Austronesian peoples
Austronesian peoples
and Polynesia
Polynesia
§ History of the Polynesian peopleThe Polynesian spread of colonization of the Pacific throughout the so-called Polynesian Triangle.Polynesian warrior canoesPolynesians, including Samoans, Tongans, Niueans, Cook Islands
Cook Islands
Māori, Tahitian Mā'ohi, Hawaiian Māoli, Marquesans and New Zealand
New Zealand
Māori, are a subset of the Austronesian peoples
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Tropical Cyclone
A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane (/ˈhʌrɪkən, -keɪn/),[1][2][3] typhoon (/taɪˈfuːn/), tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone.[4] A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; while in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as “tropical cyclones” or “severe cyclonic storms”.[4] “Tropical” refers to the geographical origin of these systems, which form almost exclusively over tropical seas
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Coconut
The coconut tree (Cocos nucifera) is a member of the family Arecaceae (palm family) and the only species of the genus Cocos.[1] The term coconut can refer to the whole coconut palm or the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. The spelling cocoanut is an archaic form of the word.[2] The term is derived from the 16th-century Portuguese and Spanish word coco meaning "head" or "skull", from the three indentations on the coconut shell that resemble facial features.[3] Coconuts are known for their versatility ranging from food to cosmetics.[4] They form a regular part of the diets of many people in the tropics and subtropics. Coconuts are distinct from other fruits for their endosperm containing a large quantity of water[4] (also called "milk"),[5] and when immature, may be harvested for the potable coconut water
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Trade Wind
The trade winds are the prevailing pattern of easterly surface winds found in the tropics, within the lower portion of the Earth's atmosphere, in the lower section of the troposphere near the Earth's equator. The trade winds blow predominantly from the northeast in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and from the southeast in the Southern Hemisphere, strengthening during the winter and when the Arctic oscillation
Arctic oscillation
is in its warm phase
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Presbyterian
Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
is a part of the Reformed tradition
Reformed tradition
within Protestantism
Protestantism
which traces its origins to the British Isles, particularly Scotland. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government, which is governed by representative assemblies of elders. A great number of Reformed churches
Reformed churches
are organized this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied uniquely to churches that trace their roots to the Scottish and English Presbyterians, as well as several English dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.[2] Presbyterian theology typically emphasizes the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures, and the necessity of grace through faith in Christ
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