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Astropulse
Astropulse
Astropulse
is a distributed computing project that uses volunteers around the globe to lend their unused computing power to search for primordial black holes, pulsars, and extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). Volunteer resources are harnessed through Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. In 1999, the Space Sciences Laboratory
Space Sciences Laboratory
launched SETI@home, which would rely on massively parallel computation on desktop computers scattered around the world. SETI@home
SETI@home
utilizes recorded data from the Arecibo radio telescope and searches for narrow-bandwidth radio signals from space, signifying the presence of extraterrestrial technology
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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University Of Manchester
Blue, gold, purple                                                              Affiliations Universities Research Association Sutton 30 Russell Group EUA N8 Group NWUA ACUWebsite manchester.ac.ukThe University of Manchester
Manchester
is a public research university in Manchester, England, formed in 2004 by the merger of the University of Manchester
Manchester
Institute of Science and Technology and the Victoria University of Manchester.[6][7] The University of Manchester
Manchester
is a red brick university, a product of the civic university movement of the late-19th century. The main campus is south of Manchester
Manchester
city centre on Oxford Road
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Hertz
The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.[1] It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves. Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples: kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones, particularly those used in radio- and audio-related applications
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Milky Way
The Milky Way
Milky Way
is the galaxy[21][nb 1] that contains our Solar System.[22] The descriptive "milky" is derived from the appearance from Earth
Earth
of the galaxy – a band of light seen in the night sky formed from stars that cannot be individually distinguished by the naked eye. The term Milky Way
Milky Way
is a translation of the Latin
Latin
via lactea, from the Greek γαλαξίας κύκλος (galaxías kýklos, "milky circle").[23][24][25] From Earth, the Milky Way appears as a band because its disk-shaped structure is viewed from within. Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei
first resolved the band of light into individual stars with his telescope in 1610
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Computing Platform
A computing platform or digital platform[1] is the environment in which a piece of software is executed. It may be the hardware or the operating system (OS), even a web browser and associated application programming interfaces, or other underlying software, as long as the program code is executed with it. Computing platforms have different abstraction levels, including a computer architecture, an OS, or runtime libraries.[2] A computing platform is the stage on which computer programs can run. A platform can be seen both as a constraint on the software development process, in that different platforms provide different functionality and restrictions; and as an assistance to the development process, in that they provide low-level functionality ready-made
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Hawking Radiation
Hawking radiation, also known as Hawking–Bekenstein radiation,[1] or Hawking–Zel'dovich radiation,[2] is blackbody radiation that is predicted to be released by black holes, due to quantum effects near the event horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking, who provided a theoretical argument for its existence in 1974,[3][4] and Jacob Bekenstein, who predicted that black holes should have a finite entropy.[5] Hawking's work followed his visit to Moscow
Moscow
in 1973 where the Soviet scientists Yakov Zel'dovich
Yakov Zel'dovich
and Alexei Starobinsky
Alexei Starobinsky
showed him that, according to the quantum mechanical uncertainty principle, rotating black holes should create and emit particles.[6] Hawking radiation reduces the mass and energy of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation
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Gamma Rays
Gamma
Gamma
rays (also called gamma radiation), denoted by the lower-case Greek letter gamma (γ or γ displaystyle gamma ), are penetrating electromagnetic radiation of a kind arising from the radioactive decay of atomic nuclei. It consists of photons in the highest observed range of photon energy. Paul Villard, a French chemist and physicist, discovered gamma radiation in 1900 while studying radiation emitted by radium. In 1903, Ernest Rutherford
Ernest Rutherford
named this radiation gamma rays
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Maura McLaughlin
Maura McLaughlin Ph.D. is currently an astrophysics professor at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia. She holds a Bachelor's of Science degree from Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. from Cornell University.[1] She is known for her work on furthering the research on gravitational waves and for her dedication to the Pulsar Search Collaboratory.[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Work 3 Awards[6] 4 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] McLaughlin grew up in Oreland, Pennsylvania.[3] She received a Bachelor's of Science degree in Astronomy and Astrophysics from the Pennsylvania State University in 1994. She obtained a Ph.D. in Astronomy and Space Sciences from Cornell University in 2001
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Jodrell Bank Observatory
The Jodrell Bank Observatory
Observatory
(originally the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station, then the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories from 1966 to 1999; /ˈdʒɒdrəl/) is a British observatory that hosts a number of radio telescopes, and is part of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics
Astrophysics
at the University of Manchester. The observatory was established in 1945 by Sir Bernard Lovell, a radio astronomer at the University of Manchester
University of Manchester
who wanted to investigate cosmic rays after his work on radar during the Second World War. It has since played an important role in the research of meteors, quasars, pulsars, masers and gravitational lenses, and was heavily involved with the tracking of space probes at the start of the Space Age
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Radio Frequency
Radio
Radio
frequency (RF) is any of the electromagnetic wave frequencies that lie in the range extending from around 7004200000000000000♠20 kHz to 7011300000000000000♠300 GHz, roughly the frequencies used in radio communication.[1] The term does not have an official definition, and different sources specify slightly different upper and lower bounds for the frequency range. RF usually refers to electrical rather than mechanical oscillations. However, mechanical RF systems do exist (see mechanical filter and RF MEMS). Although radio frequency is a rate of oscillation, the term "radio frequency" or its abbreviation "RF" are used as a synonym for radio – i.e., to describe the use of wireless communication, as opposed to communication via electric wires
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Chirp
A chirp is a signal in which the frequency increases (up-chirp) or decreases (down-chirp) with time. In some sources, the term chirp is used interchangeably with sweep signal.[1] It is commonly used in sonar and radar, but has other applications, such as in spread-spectrum communications. In spread-spectrum usage, surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices such as reflective array compressors (RACs) are often used to generate and demodulate the chirped signals. In optics, ultrashort laser pulses also exhibit chirp, which, in optical transmission systems, interacts with the dispersion properties of the materials, increasing or decreasing total pulse dispersion as the signal propagates
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Karl Jansky
Karl Guthe Jansky (October 22, 1905 – February 14, 1950) was an American physicist and radio engineer who in August 1931 first discovered radio waves emanating from the Milky Way. He is considered one of the founding figures of radio astronomy.[1] Contents1 Early life 2 Radio
Radio
astronomy 3 Follow-up 4 Legacy and death 5 Selected writings 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Karl Guthe Jansky was born in what was then the Territory of Oklahoma where his father, Cyril M. Jansky, was Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma
University of Oklahoma
at Norman. Cyril M. Jansky, born in Wisconsin
Wisconsin
of Czech immigrants, had started teaching at the age of sixteen. He was a teacher throughout his active life, retiring as Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin
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Quasar
A quasar (/ˈkweɪzɑːr/) (also quasi-stellar object or QSO) is an active galactic nucleus of very high luminosity. A quasar consists of a supermassive black hole surrounded by an orbiting accretion disk of gas. As gas in the accretion disk falls toward the black hole, energy is released in the form of electromagnetic radiation. Quasars emit energy across the electromagnetic spectrum and can be observed at radio, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray
X-ray
wavelengths. The most powerful quasars have luminosities exceeding 1041 W, thousands of times greater than the luminosity of a large galaxy such as the Milky Way.[2] The term "quasar" originated as a contraction of "quasi-stellar radio source", because quasars were first identified as sources of radio-wave emission, and in photographic images at visible wavelengths they resembled point-like stars
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Parkes Observatory
The Parkes Observatory
Parkes Observatory
(also known informally as "The Dish"[1]) is a radio telescope observatory, located 20 kilometres north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales, Australia. It was one of several radio antennas used to receive live, televised images of the Apollo 11
Apollo 11
moon landing on 20 July 1969. Its scientific contributions over the decades led the ABC to describe it as "the most successful scientific instrument ever built in Australia"[1] after 50 years of operation. The Parkes Observatory
Parkes Observatory
is run by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) as part of the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) network of radio telescopes
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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