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Astro-G
ASTRO-G (also known as VSOP-2, and very rarely called VSOP-B) was a planned radio telescope satellite by JAXA. It was expected to be launched into elliptic orbit around Earth (apogee height 25,000 km, perigee height 1,000 km).[1] Astro-G was selected in February 2006 against the competition of a proposed new X-Ray astronomy mission (NeXT) and a proposed solar sail mission to Jupiter. Funding started from FY 2007 with a budget of 12 billion yen, around 100 million US dollars
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Radio Telescope
A radio telescope is a specialized antenna and radio receiver used to receive radio waves from astronomical radio sources in the sky in radio astronomy.[1][2][3] Radio telescopes are the main observing instrument used in radio astronomy, which studies the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by astronomical objects, just as optical telescopes are the main observing instrument used in traditional optical astronomy which studies the light wave portion of the spectrum coming from astronomical objects. Radio telescopes are typically large parabolic ("dish") antennas similar to those employed in tracking and communicating with satellites and space probes. They may be used singly or linked together electronically in an array. Unlike optical telescopes, radio telescopes can be used in the daytime as well as at night
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Satellite
In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit. Such objects are sometimes called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as Earth's Moon. In 1957 the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
launched the world's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1. Since then, about 6,600 satellites from more than 40 countries have been launched. According to a 2013 estimate, 3,600 remained in orbit.[1] Of those, about 1,000 were operational;[2] while the rest have lived out their useful lives and become space debris. Approximately 500 operational satellites are in low-Earth orbit, 50 are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), and the rest are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km).[3] A few large satellites have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit
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Winds
Wind
Wind
is the flow of gases on a large scale. On the surface of the Earth, wind consists of the bulk movement of air. In outer space, solar wind is the movement of gases or charged particles from the Sun through space, while planetary wind is the outgassing of light chemical elements from a planet's atmosphere into space. Winds are commonly classified by their spatial scale, their speed, the types of forces that cause them, the regions in which they occur, and their effect. The strongest observed winds on a planet in the Solar System occur on Neptune
Neptune
and Saturn. Winds have various aspects, an important one being its velocity (wind speed); another the density of the gas involved; another its energy content or wind energy
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N-STAR B
N-STAR b, was a geostationary communications satellite originally ordered by a consortium including NTT DoCoMo and JSAT Corporation, and later fully acquired by JSAT, which was merged into SKY Perfect JSAT Group
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N-STAR A
N-STAR a, was a geostationary communications satellite originally ordered by a consortium including NTT DoCoMo and JSAT Corporation, and later fully acquired by JSAT, which was merged into SKY Perfect JSAT Group
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N-STAR
The JSAT constellation is a communication and broadcasting satellite constellation formerly operated by JSAT Corporation and currently by SKY Perfect JSAT Group. It has become the most important commercial constellation in Japan, and the fifth of the world. It has practically amalgamated all private satellite operators in Japan, with only B-SAT left as a local competitor.[1] It began in 1985 with the opening of the communication markets in Japan and the founding of Japan Communications Satellite Company, Satellite Japan Corporation, Space Communications Corporation
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BS-3N
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home television services in Japan
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BS-3H
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home television services in Japan
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BS-2X
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home television services in Japan
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BS-3b
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home television services in Japan
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BS-3a
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite
Satellite
or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO
EURO
with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home
Direct-To-Home
television services in Japan
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BS-2b
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home television services in Japan
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BS-2a
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home television services in Japan
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Yuri (satellite)
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite
Satellite
or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO
EURO
with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home
Direct-To-Home
television services in Japan
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Broadcasting Satellite (Japanese)
Yuri, also known as Broadcasting Satellite
Satellite
or BS, was a series of Japanese direct broadcast satellites. The first satellite of this series, called BSE or Yuri 1, was launched in 1978. The last BS series satellite, BS-3b (Yuri 3b), was launched in 1991.Contents1 Early models 2 BS satellites 3 Satellites 4 References 5 External linksEarly models[edit] The 350 kg BSE was followed in 1984 and 1986 by the operational and essentially identical BS-2a and BS-2b satellites, respectively. Each spacecraft carried two active and one spare 100 W. 14/12 GHz transponder. Built by EURO
EURO
with assistance from ASR, the BS-2 series satellites were designed for five years of operation. BS-2a was moved to a graveyard orbit in 1989, as was BS-2b in 1992. BS satellites[edit] BS satellites were used for Direct-To-Home
Direct-To-Home
television services in Japan
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