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Astrid Kirchherr
Astrid Kirchherr
Astrid Kirchherr
(born 20 May 1938) is a German photographer and artist and is well known for her association with the Beatles
Beatles
(along with her friends Klaus Voormann
Klaus Voormann
and Jürgen Vollmer), and her photographs of the band's original members – John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stuart Sutcliffe
Stuart Sutcliffe
and Pete Best
Pete Best
– during their early days in Hamburg. Kirchherr met artist Sutcliffe in the Kaiserkeller
Kaiserkeller
bar in Hamburg
Hamburg
in 1960, where he was playing bass with the Beatles, and was later engaged to him, before his death in 1962
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Ashton Kutcher
Christopher Ashton Kutcher
Ashton Kutcher
(/ˈkʊtʃər/; born February 7, 1978)[1] is an American actor and investor. He began his acting career portraying Michael Kelso
Michael Kelso
in the Fox sitcom That '70s Show (1998–2006). He made his film debut in the romantic comedy Coming Soon (1999) and became known by audiences in the comedy film Dude, Where's My Car? (2000), which was a box office hit. Kutcher appeared in romantic comedies Just Married
Just Married
(2003) and My Boss's Daughter
My Boss's Daughter
(2003) and, the same year, he created, produced, and hosted Punk'd
Punk'd
which aired on MTV
MTV
for five seasons until its revival in 2012
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Germans
Germans
Germans
(German: Deutsche) are a Germanic ethnic group native to Central Europe,[24] who share a common German ancestry, culture and history
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Jean-Paul Sartre
Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre
Sartre
(/ˈsɑːrtrə/;[8] French: [saʁtʁ]; 21 June 1905 – 15 April 1980) was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the key figures in the philosophy of existentialism and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in 20th-century French philosophy and Marxism. His work has also influenced sociology, critical theory, post-colonial theory, and literary studies, and continues to influence these disciplines. Sartre
Sartre
was also noted for his open relationship with prominent feminist and fellow existentialist philosopher and writer Simone de Beauvoir. Together, Sartre
Sartre
and de Beauvoir challenged the cultural and social assumptions and expectations of their upbringings, which they considered bourgeois, in both lifestyle and thought
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Cool (aesthetic)
Coolness is an aesthetic of attitude, behavior, comportment, appearance and style which is generally admired. Because of the varied and changing connotations of cool, as well as its subjective nature, the word has no single meaning. It has associations of composure and self-control (cf. the OED definition) and often is used as an expression of admiration or approval
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Reeperbahn
The Reeperbahn (German: [ˈʀeːpɐˌbaːn] ( listen)) is a street and entertainment district in Hamburg's St. Pauli district, one of the two centres of Hamburg's nightlife (the other being Sternschanze) and also the city's major red-light district. In German, it is also nicknamed die sündigste Meile (the most sinful mile) and Kiez. The Reeperbahn Festival is among the largest club festivals.Contents1 Name and history 2 The street and its side streets 3 The Beatles 4 Popular culture 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName and history[edit] The name Reeperbahn means ropewalk, which is a place where ropes are made (Low German Reep = rope, the standard German word is Seil; Bahn = track). Until the 1620s Hamburg's ropewalks had been located in the Neustadt (New Town) quarter of the inner city close to the Elbe, which then became a densely built up area
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Rock N' Roll
Rock and roll
Rock and roll
(often written as rock & roll or rock 'n' roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s,[1][2] from African American musical styles such as gospel, jump blues, jazz, boogie woogie, and rhythm and blues,[3] along with country music.[4] While elements of rock and roll can be heard in blues records from the 1920s[5] and in country records of the 1930s,[4] the genre did not acquire its name until 1954.[6][7] According to Greg Kot, "rock and roll" refers to a style of popular music originating in the U.S
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Trad Jazz
Trad jazz, short for "traditional jazz", is the Dixieland
Dixieland
and ragtime jazz styles of the early 20th century,[1] which typically used a front line of trumpet, clarinet and trombone in contrast to more modern styles which usually include saxophones, and the revival of these styles in mid 20th-century Britain before the emergence of beat music.Contents1 Beginnings of revival 2 Britain 3 Later revivals 4 ReferencesBeginnings of revival[edit] A Dixieland
Dixieland
revival began in the United States on the West Coast in the late 1930s as a backlash to the Chicago style, which was close to swing. Lu Watters and the Yerba Buena Jazz
Jazz
Band, and trombonist Turk Murphy, adopted the repertoire of Joe "King" Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong
and W. C. Handy: bands included banjo and tuba in the rhythm sections
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Nat King Cole
Nathaniel Adams Coles (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965), known professionally as Nat King Cole, was an American jazz pianist and vocalist. He recorded over one hundred songs that became hits on the pop charts. His trio was the model for small jazz ensembles that followed. Cole also acted in films and on television and performed on Broadway. He was the first black man to host an American television series.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Birth of the trio 1.3 Popularity as a vocalist2 Personal life2.1 Marriages and children 2.2 Experiences with racism 2.3 Politics3 Illness and death 4 Posthumous releases 5 Legacy 6 Discography 7 Filmography 8 Partial television credits 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Nathaniel Adams Coles was born in Montgomery, Alabama, on March 17, 1919.[1] He had three brothers: Eddie (1910–1970), Ike (1927–2001), and Freddy (b
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The Platters
The Platters
The Platters
is an American vocal group formed in 1952. They were one of the most successful vocal groups of the early rock and roll era. Their distinctive sound was a bridge between the pre-rock Tin Pan Alley tradition and the burgeoning new genre. The act went through several personnel changes, with the most successful incarnation comprising lead tenor Tony Williams, David Lynch, Paul Robi, Herb Reed, and Zola Taylor. The group had 40 charting singles on the Billboard Hot 100
Billboard Hot 100
chart between 1955 and 1967, including four number-one hits
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Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut
(/ˈsaʊ.ərkraʊt/; German: [ˈzaʊɐˌkʁaʊt] ( listen)) is finely cut cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria.[1][2] It has a long shelf life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage.[3][4]Contents1 Overview 2 Production 3 Regional varieties 4 Health effects4.1 Benefits 4.2 Disadvantages 4.3 CRIS
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Snapshot (photography)
A snapshot is popularly defined as a photograph that is "shot" spontaneously and quickly, most often without artistic or journalistic intent. Snapshots are commonly considered to be technically "imperfect" or amateurish—out of focus or poorly framed or composed. Common snapshot subjects include the events of everyday life, such as birthday parties and other celebrations, sunsets, children playing, group photos, pets, tourist attractions and the like. Details[edit] The snapshot concept was introduced to the public on a large scale by Eastman Kodak, which introduced the Brownie box camera in 1900
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Existentialist
Existentialism
Existentialism
(/ɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəlɪzəm/)[1] is a tradition of philosophical inquiry associated mainly with certain 19th and 20th-century European philosophers who, despite profound doctrinal differences,[2][3][4] shared the belief that philosophical thinking begins with the human subject—not merely the thinking subject, but the acting, feeling, living human individual.[5] While the predominant value of existentialist thought is commonly acknowledged to be freedom, its primary virtue is authenticity.[6] In the view of the existentialist, the individual's starting poi
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Rolleicord
The Rolleicord
Rolleicord
was a popular medium-format twin lens reflex camera made by Franke & Heidecke (Rollei) between 1933 and 1976. It was a simpler, less expensive version of the high-end Rolleiflex
Rolleiflex
TLR, aimed at amateur photographers who wanted a high-quality camera but could not afford the expensive Rolleiflex. Several models of Rolleicord
Rolleicord
were made; the later models generally had more advanced features and tend to be valued higher in today's market. The first Rolleicord, introduced in November 1933, was the Rolleicord I. This camera was a simplified version of the Standard Rolleiflex, with a cheaper 75mm Zeiss Triotar lens and a simplified film advance mechanism using a knob instead of the crank found on the Rolleiflex. The Rolleicord
Rolleicord
I was available either with a plain leatherette covering or elaborately patterned metal faceplates
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Funfair
A fair (archaic: faire or fayre) is a gathering of people for a variety of entertainment or commercial activities. It is normally of the essence of a fair that it is temporary with scheduled times lasting from an afternoon to several weeks.Contents1 Types of fairs 2 History 3 Legacy3.1 Legal implications 3.2 In art and language4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingTypes of fairs[edit]Roundabouts (also known as a carousel or merry-go-round) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairsVariations of fairs include:Street fair, a fair that celebrates the character of a neighborhood and merchant oriented, (as the word 'fair' is historically defined; that being a marketplace). As its name suggests, it is usually held on the main street of a neighborhood. Fête, an elaborate festival, party, or celebration. Festival, an event ordinarily coordinated and/or celebrated by a community or group with a theme e.g
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Hamburger Dom
The Hamburger Dom[1] is a large fair held at Heiligengeistfeld
Heiligengeistfeld
fair ground in central Hamburg, Germany. With three fairs (spring, summer and winter) per year it is the biggest and the longest fair throughout Germany
Germany
and attracts approximately ten million visitors per year.[citation needed] It is also referred to as a Volksfest
Volksfest
(beer festival and travelling funfair). Hamburger Dom
Hamburger Dom
puts on an impressive firework display at the Heiligengeistfeld, that can be seen across most of the city, every Friday that it runs at 22:30 hrs.[2] History[edit] A market in or in front of Hamburg's Cathedral (German: Hamburger Dom) was first recorded in 1329, at the beginning only in special seasons like Christmas. With the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the 16th century the fair was also held at other times
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