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Astor Library
Coordinates : 40°43′45.18″N 73°59′30.45″W / 40.7292167°N 73.9917917°W / 40.7292167; -73.9917917 This article includes a list of references , but ITS SOURCES REMAIN UNCLEAR because it has INSUFFICIENT INLINE CITATIONS . Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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Life (magazine)
LIFE was an American magazine that ran weekly from 1883 to 1936 as a humor magazine with limited circulation. Time owner Henry Luce
Henry Luce
bought the magazine in 1936, solely so that he could acquire the rights to its name, and launched a major weekly news magazine with a strong emphasis on photojournalism . Life was published weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 to 2000. After 2000 Time Inc.
Time Inc.
continued to use the Life brand for special and commemorative issues. Life returned to regularly scheduled issues when it became a weekly newspaper supplement from 2004 to 2007. The website life.com, originally one of the channels on Time Inc.'s Pathfinder service, was for a time in the late 2000s managed as a joint venture with Getty Images
Getty Images
under the name See Your World, LLC,. On January 30, 2012, the LIFE.com URL became a photo channel on Time.com
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Linguistics
LINGUISTICS is the scientific study of language , and involves an analysis of language form , language meaning , and language in context . The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BCE Indian grammarian Pāṇini
Pāṇini
, who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī. Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning . Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties. The study of language meaning , on the other hand, deals with how languages encode relations between entities, properties, and other aspects of the world to convey, process, and assign meaning, as well as manage and resolve ambiguity
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Brussels
}} BRUSSELS (French : Bruxelles, ( listen ); Dutch : Brussel, ( listen )), officially the BRUSSELS-CAPITAL REGION (French : Région de Bruxelles-Capitale, Dutch : Brussels
Brussels
Hoofdstedelijk Gewest), is a region of Belgium
Belgium
comprising 19 municipalities , including the City of Brussels
Brussels
which is the capital of Belgium
Belgium
. The Brussels-Capital Region is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium
Belgium
and the Flemish Community
Flemish Community
, but is separate from the region of Flanders
Flanders
(in which it forms an enclave ) or Wallonia
Wallonia
. Compared to most regions in Europe, Brussels has a relatively small territory, with an area of ​​161 km² (62.31 sq mi)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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Classics
CLASSICS or CLASSICAL STUDIES is the study of classical antiquity . It encompasses the study of the Greco-Roman world , particularly of its languages, and literature ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Classical Latin) but also it encompasses the study of Greco-Roman philosophy, history, and archaeology. Traditionally in the West , the study of the Greek and Roman classics was considered one of the cornerstones of the humanities and a necessary part of a rounded education. It has been traditionally a cornerstone of a typical elite education
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Ex Officio
This page lists English translations of notable Latin
Latin
phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases , as Greek rhetoric and literature reached its peak centuries before the rise of ancient Rome . This list covers the letter E. See List of Latin
Latin
phrases for the main list. LIST OF LATIN PHRASES * A * B * C * D * E * F * G * H * I * J * K * L * M * N * O * P * Q * R * S * T * U * V * W * X * Y * Z * full References E LATIN TRANSLATION NOTES E CAUSA IGNOTA of unknown cause Often used in medicine when the underlying disease causing a symptom is not known. Cf. idiopathic . E PLURIBUS UNUM out of many, one Literally, out of more (than one), one. Used on many U.S. coins and inscribed on the Capitol . Also used as the motto of S.L
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United States Ambassador To Spain
This is a list of United States Ambassadors to Spain
Spain
from 1779 to the present day. CONTENTS * 1 Ambassadors * 2 Notes * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links AMBASSADORSU.S. DIPLOMATIC TERMS ------------------------- CAREER FSO After 1915, The United States Department of State
United States Department of State
began classifying ambassadors as career Foreign Service Officers (FSOs) for those who have served in the Foreign Service for a specified amount of time. POLITICAL APPOINTEE A person who is not a career foreign service officer, but is appointed by the president (often as a reward to political friends). APPOINTED The date that the ambassador took the oath of office; also known as “commissioning”. It follows confirmation of a presidential appointment by the Senate , or a Congressional-recess appointment by the president
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Hamilton Fish
HAMILTON FISH (August 3, 1808 – September 7, 1893), was an American statesman and politician who served as the 16th Governor of New York
Governor of New York
, a United States Senator
United States Senator
and United States Secretary of State
United States Secretary of State
. Fish is recognized as the "pillar" of the Grant Administration and considered one of the best U.S. Secretaries of State by scholars, known for his judiciousness and efforts towards reform and diplomatic moderation. Fish settled the controversial Alabama Claims
Alabama Claims
with Great Britain through his development of the concept of international arbitration . Fish kept the United States out of war with Spain over Cuban independence by coolly handling the volatile Virginius Incident
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Hamburg
HAMBURG (English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/ ; German: ( listen ), officially the FREE AND HANSEATIC CITY OF HAMBURG (German : Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg), is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
and one of the 16 states of Germany, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of a wider metropolitan area which spreads across three German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg\'s history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League
Hanseatic League
, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire , a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany
Germany
, it was a fully sovereign state. Prior to the constitutional changes in 1919 it formed a civic republic headed constitutionally by a class of hereditary grand burghers or Hanseaten
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Albany, New York
ALBANY (/ˈɔːlbəni/ ( listen ) AWL-bə-nee ) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York and the seat of Albany County . Roughly 150 miles (240 km) north of New York City
New York City
, Albany developed on the west bank of the Hudson River , about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River . The population of the City of Albany was 97,856 according to the 2010 census . Albany constitutes the economic and cultural core of the Capital District of New York State, which comprises the Albany- Schenectady -Troy , NY Metropolitan Statistical Area , including the nearby cities and suburbs of Troy, Schenectady, and Saratoga Springs . With a 2013 Census-estimated population of 1.1 million the Capital District is the third-most populous metropolitan region in the state and 38th in the United States
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Walter Scott
SIR WALTER SCOTT, 1ST BARONET, FRSE (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright and poet. Many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature . Famous titles include Ivanhoe
Ivanhoe
, Rob Roy , Old Mortality , The Lady of the Lake , Waverley , The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor . Although primarily remembered for his extensive literary works and his political engagement, Scott was an advocate , judge and legal administrator by profession, and throughout his career combined his writing and editing work with his daily occupation as Clerk of Session and Sheriff-Depute of Selkirkshire
Selkirkshire

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James Fenimore Cooper
JAMES FENIMORE COOPER (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances of frontier and Native American life in the early American days created a unique form of American literature . He lived most of his life in Cooperstown, New York
Cooperstown, New York
, which was founded by his father William on property that he owned. Cooper was a lifelong member of the Episcopal Church and, in his later years, contributed generously to it. He attended Yale University
Yale University
for three years, where he was a member of the Linonian Society , but was expelled for misbehavior. Before embarking on his career as a writer, he served in the U.S. Navy as a midshipman , which greatly influenced many of his novels and other writings
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Charles Dickens
CHARLES JOHN HUFFAM DICKENS (/ˈdɪkɪnz/ ; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era
Victorian era
. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity. Born in Portsmouth
Portsmouth
, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors\' prison . Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed readings extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms
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Jacques Charles Brunet
JACQUES CHARLES BRUNET (2 November 1780 – 14 November 1867) was a French bibliographer . CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Works * 3 Notes * 4 References * 5 External links BIOGRAPHYHe was born in Paris
Paris
, the son of a bookseller. He began his bibliographical career by the preparation of several auction catalogues, notable examples being that of the Count d'Ourches (Paris, 1811) and an 1802 supplement to the 1790 Dictionnaire bibliographique de livres rares of Duclos and Cailleau . In 1810 the first edition of his bibliographical dictionary, Manuel du libraire et de l'amateur des livres (3 vols.), appeared. Brunet published successive editions of the dictionary, which rapidly came to be recognized as the first book of its class in European literature
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Gas Lighting
GAS LIGHTING is production of artificial light from combustion of a gaseous fuel, such as hydrogen , methane , carbon monoxide , propane , butane , acetylene , ethylene , or natural gas . The light is produced either directly by the flame, generally by using special mixes of illuminating gas to increase brightness, or indirectly with other components such as the gas mantle or the limelight , with the gas primarily functioning as a heat source. Before electricity became sufficiently widespread and economical to allow for general public use, gas was the most popular method of outdoor and indoor lighting in cities and suburbs . Early gas lights were ignited manually, but many later designs are self-igniting
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