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Astor Library
Coordinates: 40°43′45.18″N 73°59′30.45″W / 40.7292167°N 73.9917917°W / 40.7292167; -73.9917917This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Hamburg
Hamburg
Hamburg
(English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/; German: [ˈhambʊɐ̯k] ( listen); locally: [ˈhambʊɪ̯ç] ( listen)), Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg [ˈhambɔːç] ( listen), officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Hamburg
(German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg),[5] is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region
Hamburg Metropolitan Region
which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state
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Hamilton Fish
Hamilton Fish
Hamilton Fish
(August 3, 1808 – September 7, 1893) was an American politician who served as the 16th Governor of New York
Governor of New York
from 1849 to 1850, a United States Senator from New York from 1851 to 1857 and the 26th United States Secretary of State
United States Secretary of State
from 1869 to 1877. Fish is recognized as the "pillar" of the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant and considered one of the best U.S
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Classics
Classics
Classics
or classical studies is the study of classical antiquity. It encompasses the study of the Greco-Roman world, particularly of its languages and literature ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Classical Latin) but also of Greco-Roman philosophy, history, and archaeology. Traditionally in the West, the study of the Greek and Roman classics was considered one of the cornerstones of the humanities and a necessary part of a rounded education
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Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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Life (magazine)
Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000. During its golden age from 1936 to 1972, Life was a wide-ranging weekly general interest magazine notable for the quality of the photography. Life began as a humor magazine with limited circulation. Time owner Henry Luce
Henry Luce
bought the magazine in 1936, solely so that he could acquire the rights to its name, and launched a major weekly news magazine with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. Life was published weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 to 2000. After 2000, Time Inc.
Time Inc.
continued to use the Life brand for special and commemorative issues
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Linguistics
Linguistics
Linguistics
is the scientific[1] study of language,[2] and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.[3] The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BC Indian grammarian Pāṇini,[4][5] who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī.[6] Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning.[7] Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties
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Brussels
Brussels
Brussels
(French: Bruxelles, [bʁysɛl] ( listen); Dutch: Brussel, [ˈbrɵsəl] ( listen)), officially the Brussels-Capital Region[6][7] (French: Région de Bruxelles-Capitale, Dutch: Brussels
Brussels
Hoofdstedelijk Gewest),[8] is a region of Belgium comprising 19 municipalities, including the City of Brussels, which is the de jure capital of Belgium.[9] The Brussels-Capital Region
Brussels-Capital Region
is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium[10] and the Flemish Community,[11] but is separate from the region of Flanders
Flanders
(in which it forms an enclave) or Wallonia.[12][13] Compared to most regions in Europe, Brussels
Brussels
has a relatively small territory, with an area of 161 km2 (62 sq mi)
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Albany, New York
Albany (/ˈɔːlbəni/ ( listen) AWL-bə-nee) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York and the seat of Albany County. Roughly 150 miles (240 km) north of New York City, Albany developed on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River. The population of the City of Albany was 97,856 according to the 2010 census. Albany constitutes the economic and cultural core of the Capital District of New York State, which comprises the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area, including the nearby cities and suburbs of Troy, Schenectady, and Saratoga Springs. With a 2013 Census-estimated population of 1.1 million [6] the Capital District is the third-most populous metropolitan region in the state and 38th in the United States.[7][8] Albany was the first European settlement in New York State
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Ex Officio
This page lists English translations of notable Latin
Latin
phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as Greek rhetoric and literature reached its peak centuries before the rise of ancient Rome.This list covers the letter E. See List of Latin
Latin
phrases for the main list.List of Latin
Latin
phrasesA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z fullReferencesE[edit]Latin Translation Notese causa ignota of unknown cause Often used in medicine when the underlying disease causing a symptom is not known. Cf. idiopathic.e pluribus unum out of many, one Literally, out of more (than one), one. Used on many U.S. coins and inscribed on the Capitol. Also used as the motto of S.L. Benfica
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Maine
Maine
Maine
(/meɪn/) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. Maine
Maine
is the 39th most extensive and the 9th least populous of the U.S. states. It is bordered by New Hampshire to the west, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the southeast, and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and northwest respectively. Maine
Maine
is the easternmost state in the contiguous United States, and the northernmost east of the Great Lakes. It is known for its jagged, rocky coastline; low, rolling mountains; heavily forested interior; and picturesque waterways, as well as its seafood cuisine, especially clams and lobster
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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Rhode Island
Coordinates: 41°42′N 71°30′W / 41.7°N 71.5°W / 41.7; -71.5State of Rhode Island
Island
and Providence PlantationsFlag SealNickname(s): The Ocean State Little Rhody[1]Motto(s): HopeOfficial language De jure: None De facto: EnglishDemonym Rhode IslanderCapital (and largest city) ProvidenceLargest metro Providence metro areaArea Ranked 50th • Total 1,214[2] sq mi (3,144 km2) • Width 37 miles (60 km) • Length 48 miles (77 km) • % water 13.9% • Latitude 41° 09' N to 42° 0
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Gas Lighting
Gas lighting
Gas lighting
is production of artificial light from combustion of a gaseous fuel, such as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, propane, butane, acetylene, ethylene, or natural gas. The light is produced either directly by the flame, generally by using special mixes of illuminating gas to increase brightness, or indirectly with other components such as the gas mantle or the limelight, with the gas primarily functioning as a fuel source. Before electricity became sufficiently widespread and economical to allow for general public use, gas was the most popular method of outdoor and indoor lighting in cities and suburbs
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Jacques Charles Brunet
Jacques
Jacques
(French: [ʒak] ( listen), Quebec French pronunciation : [ʒɑɔ̯k] ( listen)) is the French equivalent of James, ultimately originating from the name Jacob. Jacques
Jacques
is derived from the Late Latin
Late Latin
Iacobus, from the Greek Ἰακώβος (Septuagintal Greek Ἰακώβ), from the Hebrew name Jacob
Jacob
יַעֲקֹב‬.[1] (See Jacob.) James is derived from Iacomus, a variant of Iacobus.[2] As a first name, Jacques
Jacques
is often phonetically converted to English as Jacob, Jake (from Jacob), or Jack. Jack, from Jankin, is usually a diminutive of John but it can be used also as a short form for many names derived from "Jacob" like "Jacques"
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