HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Asteya
Asteya
Asteya
is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for "non-stealing". It is a virtue in Jainism
Jainism
and Hinduism
[...More...]

"Asteya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
[...More...]

"Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
[...More...]

"Public Domain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sarvārthasiddhi
Sarvārthasiddhi is a famous Jain text authored by Ācārya Pujyapada. It is the oldest commentary on Ācārya Umaswami's Tattvārthasūtra (another famous Jain text).[1][2] A commentary is a word-by-word or line-by-line explication of a text.Contents1 Author 2 Content 3 English translation 4 References 5 SourcesAuthor[edit] Ācārya Pujyapada, the author of Sarvārthasiddhi was a famous Digambara monk. Pujyapada was a poet, grammarian, philosopher and a profound scholar of Ayurveda.[3] Content[edit] The author begins with an explanation of the invocation of the Tattvārthasūtra. The ten chapters of Sarvārthasiddhi are:[4]Faith and Knowledge The Category of the Living The Lower World and the Middle World The Celestial Beings The Category of the Non-Living Influx of Karma The Five Vows Bondage of Karma Stoppage and Shedding of Karma LiberationEnglish translation[edit] Prof. S. A
[...More...]

"Sarvārthasiddhi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jain Text
Jain literature
Jain literature
comprises Jain Agamas
Jain Agamas
and subsequent commentaries on them by various Jain asectics. Jain literature
Jain literature
is primarily divided between Digambara
Digambara
literature and Svetambara
Svetambara
literature
[...More...]

"Jain Text" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mahatma Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (/ˈɡɑːndi, ˈɡæn-/;[3] Hindustani: [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India
India
to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable")[4]—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa[5]—is now used worldwide
[...More...]

"Mahatma Gandhi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Patanjali
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ramana Maharshi Siddharudha Chinmayananda NisargadattaVishishtadvaitaNammalvar Alvars Yamunacharya Ramanuja Vedanta
[...More...]

"Patanjali" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tirukkuṛaḷ
The Tirukkural
Tirukkural
or Thirukkural (Tamil: திருக்குறள், literally Sacred Verses), or shortly the Kural, is a classic Tamil text consisting of 1,330 couplets or Kurals, dealing with the everyday virtues of an individual.[2][3] Considered one of the greatest works ever written on ethics and morality, chiefly secular ethics, it is known for its universality and non-denominational nature.[4] It was authored by Valluvar, also known in full as Thiruvalluvar. The text has been dated variously from 300 BCE to 7th century CE
[...More...]

"Tirukkuṛaḷ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ahimsa
Vedic philosophyAgastya Aruni Ashtavakra Atri Vashistha YajnavalkyaMimamsaJaiminiVedantaAdvaitaBadarayana Gaudapada Adi ShankaraDvaitaMadhvacharyaSri VaishnavismRamanujaNeo-VedantaVivekananda AurobindoSamkhyaKapilaYogaPatanjaliNyayaGotamaNavya-NyāyaGangesha UpadhyayaVaisheshikaKanadaNāstika (heterodox)Ājīvika Charvaka Kashmir ShaivismAbhinavaguptaPratyabhijna TantraTamilValluvam ValluvarOtherChanakyaGeneral topicsAhimsa Atomism AtmanĀtman (Hinduism) Ātman (Buddhism) Ātman (Jainism)Artha Anekantavada Brahman Dharma Indian logic Karma Kama Maya Metta Moksha Nondualism Samadhi Pramana YogaJainismHaribhadra UmaswatiBuddhismBuddhaTraditionsMadhyamikaNagarjunaYogacaraVasubandhu Dharmakirti
[...More...]

"Ahimsa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shanti Parva
The Shanti Parva
Shanti Parva
(Sanskrit: शान्ति पर्व; IAST: Śānti parva; "Book of Peace") is the twelfth of eighteen books of the Indian Epic Mahabharata. It has three sub-books and 366 chapters.[1][2] It is the longest book among the eighteen books of the epic. The book is set after the war is over- the two sides have accepted peace and Yudhishthira
Yudhishthira
starts his rule of the Pandava
Pandava
kingdom. The Shanti parva recites the duties of the ruler, dharma and good governance, as counseled by the dying Bhishma
Bhishma
and various Rishis.[3] The parva includes many symbolic tales such as one about "starving and vegetarian Vishvamitra stealing meat during a famine" and fables such as that of "the fowler and pigeons"
[...More...]

"Shanti Parva" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virtue
Virtue
Virtue
(Latin: virtus, Ancient Greek: ἀρετή "arete") is moral excellence. A virtue is a trait or quality that is deemed to be morally good and thus is valued as a foundation of principle and good moral being. Personal virtues are characteristics valued as promoting collective and individual greatness. The opposite of virtue is vice. The four classic cardinal virtues are temperance, prudence, courage, and justice. Christianity
Christianity
derives the three theological virtues of faith, hope and love (charity) from 1 Corinthians. Together these make up the seven virtues
[...More...]

"Virtue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jain Monasticism
Jain monasticism
Jain monasticism
refers to the order of monks and nuns in the Jain community. The term nirgrantha ("bondless") was used for Jain monks in the past. The monastic practices of two major sects ( Digambara
Digambara
and Śvētāmbara) vary greatly, but the major principles of both are identical.Contents1 Terminology 2 History 3 Digambara
Digambara
monks 4 Initiation 5 Rules of conduct 6 Ranks 7 Attire and possessions 8 Chaturmas 9 Mahavira's asceticism 10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External linksTerminology[edit] Digambaras use the word muṇi for male monastics and aryika for female monastics. Digambara
Digambara
monks are also called nirgrantha (without bonds).[1] Buddhist texts refer to Mahavira, the last Tirthankara, as Nigaṇṭha Jñātaputta
[...More...]

"Jain Monasticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Śrāvaka (Jainism)
In Jainism, the word Śrāvaka is used to refer the Jain laity (householder).[1][2] The word śrāvaka has its roots in the word śrāvana, i.e. the one who listens (the discourses of the saints).[1] The tirthankara restores or organises the sangha, a fourfold order of muni (male monastics), aryika (female monastics), śrāvakas (male followers) and śrāvikās (female followers).[3] In Jainism, two kinds of votaries are there:-The householder (one with minor vows) The homeless ascetic (one with major vows)According to Jain text, Puruşārthasiddhyupāya:Ascetics who establish themselves in pure and absolute consciousness observe complete abstinence
[...More...]

"Śrāvaka (Jainism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Veda
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu
Hindu
textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma
[...More...]

"Veda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.