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Association Of American Law Schools
The Association of American Law
Law
Schools (AALS) is a non-profit organization of 178 law schools in the United States. Another 21 schools are "non-member fee paid" schools, which are not members but choose to pay AALS dues. Its purpose is to improve the legal profession through the improvement of legal education. It also represents the interests of law schools towards the U.S. federal government and other national associations of institutes of higher education
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Non-profit Organization
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
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Rumsfeld V. Forum For Academic And Institutional Rights, Inc.
Rumsfeld v. Forum for Academic and Institutional Rights, Inc., 547 U.S. 47 (2006), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that the federal government, under the Solomon Amendment, could constitutionally withhold funding from universities if they refuse to give military recruiters access to school resources. Law schools were unwilling to allow recruiters onto campus because they considered the military's so-called "Don't ask, don't tell" policy discriminatory
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Marriott Wardman Park
The Washington Marriott Wardman Park is a hotel located at 2600 Woodley Road NW, in the Woodley Park neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. The hotel is on Connecticut Avenue and is adjacent to the Woodley Park station of the Washington Metro. It is two blocks from the Omni Shoreham Hotel
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Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Katrina
was an extremely destructive and deadly tropical cyclone that is tied with Hurricane Harvey
Hurricane Harvey
of 2017 as the costliest tropical cyclone on record. Katrina was also one of the costliest natural disasters and one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States.[3] As Katrina made landfall, its front right quadrant, which held the strongest winds, slammed into Gulfport, Mississippi, devastating it.[4] The storm originated over the Bahamas
Bahamas
on August 23, 2005, from the merger of a tropical wave and the remnants of Tropical Depression Ten. Early on the following day, the new tropical depression intensified into Tropical Storm Katrina. The tropical cyclone headed generally westward toward Florida, and strengthened into a hurricane only two hours before making landfall at Hallandale Beach and Aventura, on August 25
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
(/ˈɔːrl(i)ənz, ɔːrˈliːnz/,[4][5] locally /ˈnɔːrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle- Orléans
Orléans
[la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States
United States
port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census.[6][7] The New Orleans metropolitan area
New Orleans metropolitan area
(New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States.[8] The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.[9] Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
was the most populous parish in Louisiana
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San Francisco
 CaliforniaCSA San Jose–San Francisco–OaklandMetro San Francisco–Oakland–HaywardMission June 29, 1776[1]Incorporated April 15, 1850[2]Founded by José Joaquín Moraga Francisco PalóuNamed for St
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Judge Advocate General's Corps
The Judge Advocate General's Corps (JAG Corps) is the branch or specialty of a military concerned with military justice and military law. Officers serving in a JAG Corps are typically called Judge Advocates. Only the chief attorney within each branch is referred to as the "Judge Advocate General"; however, individual JAG Corps officers are colloquially known as JAGs. Judge Advocates serve primarily as legal advisors to the command to which they are assigned. In this function, they can also serve as the personal legal advisor to their commander. Their advice may cover a wide range of issues dealing with administrative law, government contracting, civilian and military personnel law, law of war and international relations, environmental law, etc. They also serve as prosecutors for the military when conducting courts-martial
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First Amendment Of The United States Constitution
The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was originally proposed to assuage Anti-Federalist opposition to Constitutional ratification. Initially, the First Amendment applied only to laws enacted by the Congress, and many of its provisions were interpreted more narrowly than they are today. Beginning with Gitlow v. New York (1925), the Supreme Court applied the First Amendment to states—a process known as incorporation—through the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In Everson v
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Law School
A law school (also known as a law centre or college of law) is an institution specializing in legal education, usually involved as part of a process for becoming a lawyer within a given jurisdiction.Contents1 Law degrees1.1 Australia 1.2 Brazil 1.3 Canada 1.4 England and English common law countries 1.5 Finland 1.6 France 1.7 Indonesia 1.8 India 1.9 Malaysia 1.10 Hong Kong1.10.1 Law Schools in Hong Kong1.11 Iran 1.12 Japan 1.13 Philippines 1.14 Singapore1.14.1 Law Schools in Singapore1.15 Serbia 1.16 South Korea 1.17 Sri Lanka 1.18 Taiwan 1.19 United States2 Postgraduate and professional study 3 Alternative legal education systems3.1 UK and Europe 3.2 Australia4 List of law schools 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingLaw degrees[edit] Australia[edit] To practice in Australia, one needs to graduate with a Bachelor of Laws (LLB),
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Don't Ask, Don't Tell
"Don't ask, don't tell" (DADT) was the official United States policy on military service by gays, bisexuals, and lesbians, instituted by the Clinton Administration on February 28, 1994, when Department of Defense Directive 1304.26 issued on December 21, 1993, took effect,[1] lasting until September 20, 2011. The policy prohibited military personnel from discriminating against or harassing closeted homosexual or bisexual service members or applicants, while barring openly gay, lesbian, or bisexual persons from military service. This relaxation of legal restrictions on service by gays and lesbians in the armed forces was mandated by United States federal law Pub.L
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United States Armed Forces
Gen Joseph Dunford, USMCVice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen Paul J. Selva, USAF Senior Enlisted Advisor
Senior Enlisted Advisor
to the Chairman CSM John W. Troxell, USAManpowerMilitary age 17 with parental consent, 18 for voluntary service
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Homosexuality
Homosexuality
Homosexuality
is romantic attraction, sexual attraction or sexual behavior between members of the same sex or gender. As a sexual orientation, homosexuality is "an enduring pattern of emotional, romantic, and/or sexual attractions" to people of the same sex
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