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Assamese Language
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[7]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Kamarupa
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[3]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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ISO 639-1
 ISO 639-1:2002, Codes for the representation of names of languages — Part 1: Alpha-2 code, is the first part of the ISO 639 series of international standards for language codes. Part 1 covers the registration of two-letter codes. There are 184 two-letter codes registered as of October 2015. The registered codes cover the world's major languages. These codes are a useful international and formal shorthand for indicating languages
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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Linguasphere Observatory
The Linguasphere Observatory (or "Observatoire", based upon its original French and legal title: Observatoire Linguistique) is a transnational linguistic research network.Contents1 History 2 The Lingua sphere Register and Linguascale referential framework2.1 Examples 2.2 Languages of London 2.3 See also3 "Langues de la Liberté/Languages of Liberty" 4 "In the galaxy of languages, each person's voice is a star" 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in Quebec
Quebec
in 1983 and was subsequently established and registered in Normandy
Normandy
as a non-profit association under the honorary presidency of the late Léopold Sédar Senghor, a French-language poet and the first president of Senegal
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Pragjyotisha Kingdom
Pragjyotisha was a mythological kingdom that later came to be associated with the historical Kamarupa.[1] Nevertheless, all early references do not agree on the association with the Kamarupa kingdom in Northeast India
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Latin Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c
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Danava Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Naraka Dynasty
The Bhauma dynasty
Bhauma dynasty
is second legendary dynasty of Pragjyotisha, after the Danava dynasty, that has been mentioned in the epics such as the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Kalika Purana, the Yogini Tantra and local lore.[2] The dynasty established in Dwapar Yuga, sometime before Mahabharata
Mahabharata
war, as Bhagadatta, the son of Naraka and also friend of Pandu, fought for Kaurava's
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Writing System
A writing system is any conventional method of visually representing verbal communication. While both writing and speech are useful in conveying messages, writing differs in also being a reliable form of information storage and transfer.[1] The processes of encoding and decoding writing systems involve shared understanding between writers and readers of the meaning behind the sets of characters that make up a script. Writing
Writing
is usually recorded onto a durable medium, such as paper or electronic storage, although non-durable methods may also be used, such as writing on a computer display, on a blackboard, in sand, or by skywriting. The general attributes of writing systems can be placed into broad categories such as alphabets, syllabaries, or logographies. Any particular system can have attributes of more than one category
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Davaka
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[1]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribesBodos • Deuris • Dimasas • Karbis • Koch Rajbongshis • Misíngs • Rabhas • Tea tribesPeople of AssamLanguagesAsamiya, BodoScriptDialectsGoalpariya KamrupiTraditionsBihu GamosaKirtans - NamgharsLagundeoni Pujas Satras XoraiZikirCuisine Rice Poitabhat • Jolpan Fish Masor Tenga Sweets Narikol'or Laru • Til'or Laru Snacks Pitha Sauces Bilahir top Drink Assam TeaFestivalsAmbubachi Mela Ahoms: Me-Dam-Me-Phi Bihu Durga Puja Sahitya SabhasReligionArtCultural Development of KamarupaLiterature HistoryBeginnings Orunodoi Era Jonaki EraArchivesCha
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Kachari Kingdom
The Dimasa kingdom (Pron: kəˈʧɑ:rɪ) was a powerful kingdom on the Indian subcontinent, located in the region of Assam, India. The rulers belonged to the Dimasa ethnic group. The Dimasa kingdom and others (Kamata, Chutiya) that developed in the wake of the Kamarupa
Kamarupa
kingdom were led by chieftains of indigenous tribes and are examples of indigenous state formations in Medieval Assam. Remnants of the Dimasa kingdom lingered until the advent of the British, and this kingdom gave its name to two districts in Assam: Cachar
Cachar
and North Cachar
Cachar
Hills ( Dima Hasao
Dima Hasao
district). The origin of the Dimasa Kingdom is not clear.[1] According to tradition, Dimasas had to leave the Kamarupa
Kamarupa
Kingdom in the ancient period due to political turmoil
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Athena Asamiya
Athena Asamiya (麻宮 アテナ, Asamiya Atena) is a character originally from the former SNK's 1986 video game Psycho Soldier and a descendant of Princess Athena from the earlier Athena game. She later appears in The King of Fighters series of fighting games as a female fighter character and has appeared in each of its 14 editions. She was also given her own video game Athena: Awakening from the Ordinary Life, which only released in Japanese regions for the PlayStation in 1999.Contents1 Creation and design 2 Appearances2.1 In video games 2.2 In other media 2.3 In merchandise3 Reception 4 ReferencesCreation and design[edit] In her first appearance in Psycho Soldier Athena has long pink hair and wears a black Japanese school uniform. For The King of Fighters '94 series, there was pressure within staff about including the character. The staff worked so much on her that other developers accused them of favoritism
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Baro-Bhuyan
The Baro-Bhuyans (spelled variously as Baro-Bhuinas, "Baro-Bhuiyan" etc.) were warrior chiefs and landlords (zamindars) on the Indian subcontinent; in the region of medieval Assam
Assam
and Bengal, who maintained a loosely independent confederacy. In times of aggression by external powers, they generally cooperated in defending and expelling the aggressor. In times of peace, they maintained their respective sovereignty
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Colonial Assam
Colonial Assam
Assam
(1826–1947) refers to the period of History of Assam between the signing of the Treaty of Yandabo and Independence of India when Assam
Assam
was under the British colonial rule. The political institutions and social relations that were established or severed during this period continue to have a direct effect on contemporary events. The legislature and political alignments that evolved by the end of the British rule continued in the post Independence period
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