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Askham Bryan
Askham Bryan
Askham Bryan
is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of City of York
York
in the north of England, 6 miles south-west of York, west of Bishopthorpe, and close to Askham Richard
Askham Richard
and Copmanthorpe. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 582, reducing to 564 at the 2011 census.[1] Prior to 1996 it formed part of the district of Selby. Askham Bryan
Askham Bryan
is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The name comes from Ascam or Ascha meaning "enclosure of ash-tree". "Bryan" is Bryan FitzAlan. He and his heirs held the manor from the 12th century.[2][3] In the village is Askham Hall and nearby is Askham Bryan College
Askham Bryan College
of Agriculture
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North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county (or shire county) and larger ceremonial county in England. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber but partly in the region of North East England. Created by the Local Government Act 1972,[2] it covers an area of 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi), making it the largest county in England. The majority of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors lie within North Yorkshire's boundaries, and around 40% of the county is covered by National Parks
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Civil Parishes In England
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Unitary Authority
A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area or performs additional functions which elsewhere in the relevant country are usually performed by national government or a higher level of sub-national government. Typically unitary authorities cover towns or cities which are large enough to function independently of county or other regional administration. Sometimes they consist of national sub-divisions which are distinguished from others in the same country by having no lower level of administration.Contents1 Canada 2 Central Europe 3 Denmark 4 New Zealand 5 Poland 6 United Kingdom6.1 England 6.2 Northern Ireland 6.3 Scotland 6.4 Wales7 United States 8 See also 9 ReferencesCanada[edit] In Canada, each province creates its own system of local government, so terminology varies substantially. In certain provinces (e.g
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Bishopthorpe
Bishopthorpe
Bishopthorpe
is a village and civil parish three miles south of York in the City of York
City of York
unitary authority and ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. It is close to the River Ouse, and has a population of 3,174, increasing to 3,237 at the 2011 Census.[1] Before 1996 it was part of the Selby district. The area of Main Street and the Palace were made a conservation area in 1989 along with other open areas of the village.[2] It was formerly known as St Andrewthorpe, but in the 13th century, Archbishop Walter de Grey
Walter de Grey
bought the manor house and gave it to the Dean and Chapter of York
York
Minster.[3] This became Bishopthorpe
Bishopthorpe
Palace, the residence of the Archbishop of York
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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Lord Of The Manor
In British or Irish history, the lordship of a manor is a lordship emanating from the feudal system of manorialism. In modern England and Wales, it is recognised as a form of property,[1] one of three elements of a manor that may exist separately or be combined, and may be held in moieties:the title (deriving from the Roman concept of dignitas); the manorial, comprising the manor and/or its land; and the seignory, rights granted to the titular holder of the manor.A title similar to such a lordship is known in French as Seigneur du Manoir, Welsh as Breyr, Gutsherr in German, Godsherre in Norwegian and Swedish, Ambachtsheer in Dutch and Signore or Vassallo in Italian
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Conservation Area
Protected areas or conservation areas are locations which receive protection because of their recognized natural, ecological or cultural values. There are several kinds of protected areas, which vary by level of protection depending on the enabling laws of each country or the regulations of the international organizations involved. The term "protected area" also includes Marine Protected Areas, the boundaries of which will include some area of ocean, and Transboundary Protected Areas that overlap multiple countries which remove the borders inside the area for conservation and economic purposes
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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Medieval
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Mallard
A. p. platyrhynchos Linnaeus, 1758 A. p. domesticus Linnaeus, 1758 A. p. conboschas C. L. Brehm, 1831 (disputed)Natural Range of Anas
Anas
platyrhynchosSynonyms Anas
Anas
boschas Linnaeus, 1758The mallard (/ˈmælɑːrd/ or /ˈmælərd/) ( Anas
Anas
platyrhynchos) is a dabbling duck that breeds throughout the temperate and subtropical Americas, Eurasia, and North Africa
North Africa
and has been introduced to New Zealand, Australia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, the Falkland Islands, and South Africa. This duck belongs to the subfamily Anatinae
Anatinae
of the waterfowl family Anatidae
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Moorhen
Gallinula angulata Gallinula chloropus Gallinula galeata (but see text) Gallinula comeri Gallinula pacifica (but see text) Gallinula silvestris (but see text) Gallinula tenebrosa Porphyriops melanops Tribonyx mortierii Tribonyx ventralis and see textSynonymsEdithornis PareudiastesMoorhens — sometimes called marsh hens — are medium-sized water birds that are members of the rail family (Rallidae). Most species are placed in the genus Gallinula, Latin for "little hen".[1] They are close relatives of coots, and because of their apparently nervous behavior (frequently twitching tail, neck and grinding their backs) are sometimes called "skitty coots". They are often referred to as (black) gallinules. Recently, one of the species of Gallinula was found to have enough differences to form a new genus Paragallinula with the only species being the Lesser moorhen (Paragallinula angulata). Two species from the Australian region, sometimes separated in Tribonyx, are called "nativehens"
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