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Ashvatthama
Ashvatthama (Sanskrit: अश्वत्थामा, Aśvatthāmā) or Ashvatthaman (Sanskrit: अश्वत्थामन्, Aśvatthāman) or Drauni was the son of guru Drona
Drona
and he is the grandson of the sage Bharadwaja. Ashvatthama is a mighty Maharathi[1] who fought on the Kaurava
Kaurava
side against the Pandavas
Pandavas
in the Kurukshetra War. Ashvatthama is considered as avatar of one of the eleven Rudras and one of the seven Chiranjivi. Along with his maternal uncle Kripa, Ashvatthama is believed to be a living survivor of the Kurukshetra War.[2] The deceptive plot of his rumoured 'death' led to the beheading of his grieving father Drona, who was incapacitated while meditating for his son's Ātman
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Mahabharata
The Mahābhārata (US: /məhɑːˈbɑːrətə/,[1] UK: /ˌmɑːhəˈbɑːrətə/;[2] Sanskrit: महाभारतम्, Mahābhāratam, pronounced [məɦaːˈbʱaːrət̪əm]) is one of the two major Sanskrit
Sanskrit
epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.[3] The title may be translated as "the great tale of the Bhārata dynasty". The Mahābhārata is an epic legendary narrative of the Kurukṣetra War and the fates of the Kaurava
Kaurava
and the Pāṇḍava princes. It also contains philosophical and devotional material, such as a discussion of the four "goals of life" or puruṣārtha (12.161). Among the principal works and stories in the Mahābhārata are the Bhagavad Gita, the story of Damayanti, an abbreviated version of the Rāmāyaṇa, and the story of Ṛṣyasringa, often considered as works in their own right. Traditionally, the authorship of the Mahābhārata is attributed to Vyāsa
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Kritvarma
Kritavarma
Kritavarma
(Sanskrit: कृतवर्मा, Kŗtavarmā) was an important and one of the bravest Yadava
Yadava
warriors and chieftain, and a contemporary of Krishna
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Vajra
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yogaDeath yogaNgöndro Guru
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Yudhishthira
In the Hindu
Hindu
epic Mahabharata, Yudhishthira
Yudhishthira
(Sanskrit: युधिष्ठिर, yudhiṣṭhira) was the eldest son of King Pandu
Pandu
and Queen Kunti
Kunti
and the king of Indraprastha
Indraprastha
and later of Hastinapura
Hastinapura
(Kuru). He was the leader of the successful Pandava
Pandava
side in the Kurukshetra War
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Krishna
Krishna
Krishna
(/ˈkrɪʃnə/,[8] [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] ( listen); Sanskrit: कृष्ण, translit. Kṛṣṇa) is a major deity in Hinduism. He is worshiped as the eighth avatar of the god Vishnu
Vishnu
and also as the supreme God
God
in his own right.[9] He is the god of compassion, tenderness, and love in Hinduism,[1][2] and is one of the most popular and widely revered among Indian divinities.[10] Krishna's birthday is celebrated every year by Hindus on Janmashtami according to the lunisolar Hindu
Hindu
calendar, which falls in late August or early September of the Gregorian calendar.[11] Krishna
Krishna
is also known by numerous names, such as Govinda, Mukunda, Madhusudhana, Vasudeva, and Makhan chor. The anecdotes and narratives of Krishna's life are generally titled as Krishna
Krishna
Leela
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Dhristadyumna
Dhrishtadyumna
Dhrishtadyumna
(Sanskrit: धृष्टद्युम्न, dhṛṣṭadyumna, lit. he who is courageous and splendorous), also known as Draupada (Sanskrit: द्रौपद, lit. son of Drupada), was the son of Drupada
Drupada
and brother of Draupadi
Draupadi
and Shikhandi
Shikhandi
in the epic Mahabharata. He was the commander of the Pandava
Pandava
army during the Kurukshetra War
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Narayanastra
The Narayanastra
Narayanastra
(IAST: nārāyaṇastra, sanskrit: नारायणास्त्र ) (or Narainastra) was the personal weapon of Lord Vishnu
Vishnu
in his Narayana
Narayana
form. This astra ("weapon" in Sanskrit) in turn fires a powerful tirade of millions of deadly missiles simultaneously. The intensity of the shower rises with increase in resistance. The only way of defense towards this missile, is to show total submission before the missiles hit. This in turn will cause this weapon to stop and spare the target. It is one of the six 'Mantramukta' weapons that cannot be resisted.[1] Ashwathama, a Kuru warrior-hero in the epic Mahabharata
Mahabharata
unleashes this weapon on the Pandava
Pandava
forces
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Bhima
In the Hindu epic
Hindu epic
Mahabharata, Bhima
Bhima
or Bhimasena (Sanskrit: भीम) is the second of the Pandavas. The Mahabharata
Mahabharata
relates many events which portray the immense might of Bhima. Bhima
Bhima
is responsible for slaying all hundred Kaurava
Kaurava
brothers in the Kurukshetra War.Contents1 Etymology 2 Birth and early years 3 Power 4 Trouble with Kauravas4.1 Escaping fire and killing Purochana 4.2 Slaying Bakasura5 Marriage and children 6 Conquest for Rajasuya 7 Exile7.1 Slaying Kirmira 7.2 Searching for Saugandhika flower 7.3 Killing Jatasura 7.4 Cook at Virata's kingdom 7.5 Defeating Jimuta 7.6 Kichaka
Kichaka
Vadha 7.7 Susarma's defeat8 During the Kurukshetra War 9 Later years and death 10 CitationsEtymology[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Satyaki
Yuyudhana (Sanskrit: युयुधान, Yuyudhāna), better known as Satyaki
Satyaki
(Sanskrit: सात्यकि, Sātyaki), was a powerful warrior belonging to the Vrishni
Vrishni
clan of the Yadavas, to which Krishna also belonged. According to the Puranas, he was grandson of Shini of the Vrishni
Vrishni
clan, and adopted son of Satyaka, after whom he was named.[1] A valiant warrior, Satyaki
Satyaki
was devoted to Krishna
Krishna
and was a student of Arjuna. Satyaki
Satyaki
is called Sivi Raja and Sivi dynasty is called Shaineya. The daughter of Sivi King Devika married Yudhishthira and is not mentioned later on. Her sons include Devaka and Yuyudhana. They were thus real sons of Yudhishthara and adopted sons of their uncle Satyaka
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Mahismati
Mahishmati
Mahishmati
(IAST: Māhiṣmatī) was an ancient city in present-day central India. It was located in present-day Madhya Pradesh, on the banks of Narmada
Narmada
River, although its exact location is uncertain. It is mentioned in several ancient texts, and is said to have been ruled by the legendary Haihaya
Haihaya
ruler Kartavirya Arjuna. Mahishmati
Mahishmati
was the most important city in the southern part of the Avanti kingdom, and later served as the capital of the Anupa Kingdom
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Arjuna
Arjuna
Arjuna
(in Devanagari: अर्जुन arjuna) is the main central character of the ancient Indian epic Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and plays a key role in the Bhagavad Gita
Bhagavad Gita
alongside Krishna. Arjuna
Arjuna
was the son of Indra, the king of the celestials, born of Kunti, the first wife of King Pandu
Pandu
in the Kuru Kingdom. In a previous birth he was a saint named Nara who was the lifelong companion of another saint Narayana
Narayana
an incarnation of Lord Vishnu
Lord Vishnu
who took rebirth as Lord Krishna. He was the third of the Pandava
Pandava
brothers and was married to Draupadi, Ulupi, Chitrangada and Subhadra
Subhadra
(Krishna's and Balarama's sister) at different times. His children included Srutakarma, Iravan, Babruvahana, and Abhimanyu
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Dushasana
Dussasana (Sanskrit: दुःशासन, Duḥśāsana), also spelled as Dushasan and Dushyasan, was a Kaurav
Kaurav
prince, the second son of the blind king Dhritarashtra
Dhritarashtra
and Gandhari and the younger brother of Duryodhan
Duryodhan
in the Hindu epic
Hindu epic
Mahabharata.Contents1 Etymology 2 Birth and development 3 Draupadi's humiliation 4 Durmasena 5 Kurukshetra war and death 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The name is often derived from two elements, the Sanskrit: duh, meaning 'tough or hard to beat' and shasana, meaning "ruling or power"
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Bhairava
Shiva
Shiva
- ShaktiSadasiva Rudra Bhairava Parvati Durga KaliGanesha Murugan OthersScriptures and textsAgamas and TantrasVedas SvetasvataraTirumurai Shivasutras VachanasPhilosophyThree ComponentsPati Pashu PasamThree bondagesAnava Karma Maya 36 Tattvas YogaPracticesVibhuti Rudraksha Panchakshara Bilva Maha Shivaratri Yamas-Niyamas Guru-Linga-JangamSchoolsAdi MargamPashupata Kalamukha Kapalika
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Rakshasa
A Rakshasa
Rakshasa
(Sanskrit: राक्षस, rākṣasa) is a mythological being in Hindu
Hindu
mythology. As this mythology influenced other religions, the rakshasa was later incorporated into Buddhism. Rakshasas are also called "Maneaters" (Nri-chakshas, Kravyads). A female rakshasa is known as a Rakshasi. A female Rakshasa
Rakshasa
in human form is a Rakshesha
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Parvati
Parvati
Parvati
(Sanskrit: पार्वती, IAST: Pārvatī) or Uma (IAST: Umā) is the Hindu
Hindu
goddess of fertility, love and devotion; as well as of divine strength and power.[5][6][7] Known by many other names, she is the gentle and nurturing aspect of the Hindu
Hindu
goddess Shakti
Shakti
and one of the central deities of the Goddess-oriented Shakta sect. She is the mother goddess in Hinduism,[1][8] and has many attributes and aspects
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