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Ashtavinayaka
Ashtavinayaka
Ashtavinayaka
(Marathi: अष्टविनायक) literally means "eight Ganeshas" in Sanskrit. Ganesh
Ganesh
is the Hinduism/ Hindu
Hindu
deity of unity, prosperity & learning and removes obstacles. The term refers to eight Ganeshas. Ashtavinayaka
Ashtavinayaka
yatra trip refers to a pilgrimage to the eight Hindu
Hindu
temples in Maharashtra
Maharashtra
state of India that house eight distinct idols of Ganesha, in a pre-ascertained sequence. The Ashtavinayaka
Ashtavinayaka
yatra or pilgrimage covers the eight ancient holy temples of Ganesha
Ganesha
which are situated around Pune. Each of these temples has its own individual legend and history, as distinct from each other as the murtis in each temple
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Om
Om ( listen (help·info), IAST: Auṃ or Oṃ, Devanagari: ॐ) is a sacred sound and a spiritual icon in Hindu
Hindu
religion.[1][2] It is also a mantra in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism[3][4], and Sikhism. Om is part of the iconography found in ancient and medieval era manuscripts, temples, monasteries and spiritual retreats in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.[5][6] The symbol has a spiritual meaning in all Indian dharmas, but the meaning and connotations of Om vary between the diverse schools within and across the various traditions. In Hinduism, Om is one of the most important spiritual symbols.[7][8] It refers
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Asuras
Asuras (Sanskrit: असुर) are a class of divine beings or power-seeking deities related to the more benevolent devas (also known as suras) in Hindu mythology. Asuras are sometimes considered nature spirits. They battle constantly with the devas.[1] Asuras are described in Indian texts as powerful superhuman demigods or demons with good or bad qualities. The good Asuras are called Adityas and are led by Varuna, while the malevolent ones are called Danavas and are led by Vritra.[2] In the earliest layer of Vedic texts Agni, Indra
Indra
and other gods are also called Asuras, in the sense of them being "lords" of their respective domains, knowledge and abilities. In later Vedic and post-Vedic texts, the benevolent gods are called Devas, while malevolent Asuras compete against these Devas and are considered "enemy of the gods" or demons.[3] Asuras are part of Indian mythology along with Devas, Yakshas (nature spirits) and Rakshasas (ghosts, ogres)
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Bahamani
The Bahmani Sultanate
Bahmani Sultanate
(also called the Bahmanid Empire or Bahmani Kingdom) was a Muslim state of the Deccan in South India
India
and one of the major medieval Indian kingdoms.[3] Bahmanid Sultanate was the first independent Muslim kingdom in South India.[4] The empire was established by Turkic general Ala-ud-Din Bahman Shah after revolting against the Delhi Sultanate
Delhi Sultanate
of Muhammad bin Tughlaq.[5] Nazir Uddin Ismail Shah who had revolted against the Delhi Sultanate stepped down on that day in favour of Bahman Shah. His revolt was successful, and he established an independent state on the Deccan within the Delhi Sultanate's southern provinces. The Bahmani capital was Hasanabad (Gulbarga) between 1347 and 1425 when it was moved to Muhammadabad (Bidar). The Bahmani contested the control of the Deccan with the Vijayanagara Empire
Vijayanagara Empire
to the south
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Minaret
Minaret
Minaret
(/ˌmɪnəˈrɛt, ˈmɪnəˌrɛt/;[1] Persian: مناره‎ menare, Azerbaijani: minarə, Turkish: minare,[2]), from Arabic: منارة‎ manāra, lit. "lighthouse", also known as Goldaste (Persian: گلدسته‎), is a distinctive architectural structure akin to a tower and typically found adjacent to mosques. Generally a tall spire with a conical or onion-shaped crown, usually either free-standing or taller than associated support structure. The basic form of a minaret includes a base, shaft, and gallery.[3] Styles vary regionally and by period
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Mosque
A mosque (/mɒsk/; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni jurisprudence (Arabic: فِـقْـه‎, fiqh) for a place of worship to be considered a mosque, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas.[1] There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the mosque (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and in the Islamic Sharī‘ah (Arabic: شَـرِيْـعَـة‎, Law), after an area is formally designated as a mosque, it remains so until the Last Day.[1] Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents
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Mughal Empire
The Mughal Empire
Empire
(Urdu: مغلیہ سلطنت‬‎, translit. Mughliyah Saltanat)[8][2] or Mogul Empire[9] was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526
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Shiva
Shiva
Shiva
(/ˈʃiːvə, ˈʃɪ-/; Sanskrit: शिव, IAST: Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is the Supreme Being within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.[10][11] Shiva
Shiva
is the "destroyer of evil and the transformer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu
Hindu
trinity that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Vishnu.[1][12] In Shaivism
Shaivism
tradition, Shiva
Shiva
is the Supreme being who creates, protects and transforms the universe.[13][14][15] In the goddess tradition of Hinduism
Hinduism
called Shaktism, the goddess is described as supreme, yet Shiva
Shiva
is revered along with Vishnu
Vishnu
and Brahma
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Murti
A Murti
Murti
(Sanskrit: मूर्ति, IAST: Mūrti) literally means any form, embodiment or solid object,[1] and typically refers to an image, statue or idol of a deity or person in Indian culture.[2] By the Prana Pratishtha ceremony, the idol becomes identical with the deity.[3] Murtis
Murtis
are also found in some nontheistic Jainism traditions, where they serve as symbols of revered persons inside Jain temples, and are worshipped in Murtipujaka
Murtipujaka
rituals.[4][5] A Murti
Murti
is typically made by carving stone, wood working, metal casting or through pottery
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Asura
Asuras (Sanskrit: असुर) are a class of divine beings or power-seeking deities related to the more benevolent devas (also known as suras) in Hindu mythology. Asuras are sometimes considered nature spirits. They battle constantly with the devas.[1] Asuras are described in Indian texts as powerful superhuman demigods or demons with good or bad qualities. The good Asuras are called Adityas and are led by Varuna, while the malevolent ones are called Danavas and are led by Vritra.[2] In the earliest layer of Vedic texts Agni, Indra
Indra
and other gods are also called Asuras, in the sense of them being "lords" of their respective domains, knowledge and abilities. In later Vedic and post-Vedic texts, the benevolent gods are called Devas, while malevolent Asuras compete against these Devas and are considered "enemy of the gods" or demons.[3] Asuras are part of Indian mythology along with Devas, Yakshas (nature spirits) and Rakshasas (ghosts, ogres)
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Peacock
Pavo cristatus Pavo muticus Afropavo
Afropavo
congensisThe peafowl include three species of birds in the genera Pavo and Afropavo
Afropavo
of the Phasianidae
Phasianidae
family, the pheasants and their allies. There are two Asiatic species: the blue or Indian peafowl
Indian peafowl
originally of the Indian subcontinent; and the green peafowl of Southeast Asia; and one African species, the Congo peafowl, native only to the Congo Basin. Male peafowl are known for their piercing call and their extravagant plumage. The latter is especially prominent in the Asiatic species, who have an eye-spotted "tail" or "train" of covert feathers which they display as part of a courtship ritual
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Vishnu
Vishnu
Vishnu
( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
pronunciation: [vɪʂɳu]; Sanskrit: विष्णु, IAST: Viṣṇu) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
in its Vaishnavism
Vaishnavism
tradition.[5][6] Vishnu
Vishnu
is the "preserver" in the Hindu
Hindu
trinity (Trimurti) that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Shiva.[7] In Vaishnavism, Vishnu
Vishnu
is identical to the formless metaphysical concept called Brahman, the supreme, the Svayam Bhagavan, who takes various avatars as "the preserver, protector" whenever the world is threatened with evil, chaos, and destructive forces.[8] His avatars most notably include Rama
Rama
in the Ramayana
Ramayana
and Krishna
Krishna
in the Mahabharata
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Madhu
Madhu (Hindustani: मधु or مدهو) is a word used in several Indo-Aryan languages
Indo-Aryan languages
meaning honey or sweet. It also means mead and is used for alcohol. The word originates in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and has cognates in most Indo-European languages.Contents1 Alcohol
Alcohol
and mead 2 Metaphorical use 3 Usage in names 4 See also 5 References Alcohol
Alcohol
and mead[edit] Madhu, and the related terms mad (मद, مد) and madira (मदिरा, مدِرا), also mean alcohol.[1][2] These words are all derived from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language, and are Indo-European cognates of the English mead, Greek μέθυ, Avestan madu, Persian may,[3] Latvian and Lithuanian medus, German Met and Old Church Slavonic мєдъ (medŭ). In this sense, these terms are also used for additional words related to alcohol
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Khopoli
Khopoli, is an industrial city in the Khalapur taluka of Raigad district, in the Indian state of Maharashtra, at the base of the Sahyadri mountains. Patalganga River which is the tailrace channel of Tata Hydroelectric Power station
Power station
flows through Khopoli.[1][2] It is a municipal council and is a part of the Mumbai
Mumbai
Metropolitan Region. Khopoli
Khopoli
Municipal council covers an area of 30 km2.[3] Khopoli
Khopoli
is connected to the Mumbai
Mumbai
suburban railway by a single line from Karjat
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Kaitabh
Madhu (Sanskrit: मधु) and Kaitabha (Sanskrit: कैटभ), Rakshasas
Rakshasas
or demons of Hindu mythology, are associated with Hindu religious cosmology. They both originated from one of the ears of God Vishnu, while he was in the deep sleep of Yoganidra. From his navel, a lotus sprouted on which Brahma, the creator, was found sitting and contemplating the creation of the cosmos. Bhagavata Purana
Bhagavata Purana
states that during the creation, the demons Madhu and Kaitabha stole the Vedas
Vedas
from Brahma
Brahma
and deposited them deep inside the waters of the primeval ocean. Vishnu, in his manifestation as Hayagriva, killed them, and retrieved the Vedas. The bodies of Madhu and Kaitabha disintegrated into 2 times 6 — which is twelve pieces (two heads, two torsos, four arms and four legs)
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Morya Gosavi
Morya Gosavi
Morya Gosavi
or Moraya Gosavi (Morayā Gosāvi) alias Moroba Gosavi was a prominent saint of the Hindu Ganapatya
Ganapatya
sect, which considers the elephant-faced god Ganesha
Ganesha
as the Supreme Being. Morya Gosavi
Morya Gosavi
is considered the chief spiritual progenitor of the Ganapatyas and has been described as the "most famous devotee" of Ganesha.[1] The lifetime of Morya Gosavi
Morya Gosavi
is speculated between the 13th to 17th century. Numerous legends recall his life. Morya became devoted to Ganesha
Ganesha
when he started visiting the Morgaon
Morgaon
temple of Ganesha
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