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Ashtamangala
The Ashtamangala
Ashtamangala
are a sacred suite of Eight Auspicious Signs endemic to a number of Indian religions
Indian religions
such as Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. The symbols or "symbolic attributes" (Tibetan: ཕྱག་མཚན་, THL: chaktsen) are yidam and teaching tools. Not only do these attributes, these energetic signatures, point to qualities of enlightened mindstream, but they are the investiture that ornaments these enlightened "qualities" (Sanskrit: guṇa; Tibetan: ཡོན་ཏན་, THL: yönten). Many cultural enumerations and variations of the Ashtamangala
Ashtamangala
are extant.Groupings of eight auspicious symbols were originally used in India
India
at ceremonies such as an investiture or coronation of a king. An early grouping of symbols included: throne, swastika, handprint, hooked knot, vase of jewels, water libation flask, pair of fishes, lidded bowl
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Indian Religions
Indian religions
Indian religions
as a percentage of world population    Hinduism
Hinduism
(15%)    Buddhism
Buddhism
(7.1%)    Sikhism
Sikhism
(0.35%)    Jainism
Jainism
(0.06%)   Other (77.49%)Indian religions, sometimes also termed as Dharmic faiths or religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and Sikhism. [web 1][note 1] These religions are also all classified as Eastern religions
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Khidr
Khidr
Khidr
or al- Khidr
Khidr
(Arabic: الخضر‎ al-Khiḍr; also transcribed as al-Khadir, Khader/Khadr, Khidr, Khizr, Khizir, Khyzer, Qeezr, Qhezr, Qhizyer, Qhezar, Khizar, Xızır, Hızır) is a figure ascribed to a figure in the Quran[2][3] as a righteous servant of God possessing great wisdom or mystic knowledge
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Prajñā (Buddhism)
Prajñā (Sanskrit) or paññā (Pāli) "wisdom" is insight in the true nature of reality, namely primarily anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfaction or suffering), anattā (non-self) and śūnyatā (emptiness).Contents1 Etymology 2 Understanding in the Buddhist traditions2.1 Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism 2.2 Mahāyāna Buddhism3 See also 4 References 5 Sources5.1 Published sources 5.2 Web-sources6 External linksEtymology[edit] Prajñā is often translated as "wisdom", but is closer in meaning to "insight", "discriminating knowledge", or "intuitive apprehension".[1]jñā can be trans
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Karuṇā
Karuṇā
Karuṇā
(in both Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali) is generally translated as compassion.[1] It is part of the spiritual path of both Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism.Contents1 Buddhism1.1 Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism 1.2 Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism2 Jainism 3 Miscellaneous 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Sources 7 External linksBuddhism[edit] Karuṇā
Karuṇā
is important in all schools of Buddhism. For Theravāda Buddhists, dwelling in karuṇā is a means for attaining a happy present life and heavenly rebirth
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Matsya
Matsya
Matsya
(Sanskrit: मत्स्य, lit. fish), is the fish avatar in the ten primary avatars of Hindu god
Hindu god
Vishnu. Matsya
Matsya
is described to have rescued Manu and earthly existence from a great deluge. The earliest accounts of Matsya
Matsya
as a fish-saviour equates him with the Vedic deity Prajapati. The fish-savior later merges with the identity of Brahma
Brahma
in post-Vedic era, and still later as an avatar of Vishnu.[1][2][3] The legends associated with Matsya
Matsya
expand, evolve and vary in Hindu texts
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Sentient Beings (Buddhism)
In Buddhism, sentient beings are beings with consciousness, sentience, or in some contexts life itself.[1] Sentient beings are composed of the five aggregates, or skandhas: matter, sensation, perception, mental formations and consciousness. In the Samyutta Nikaya, the Buddha is recorded as saying that "just as the word 'chariot' exists on the basis of the aggregation of parts, even so the concept of 'being' exists when the five aggregates are available."[2] While distinctions in usage and potential subdivisions or classes of sentient beings vary from one school, teacher, or thinker to another, it principally refers to beings in contrast with buddhahood
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Ganges
Coordinates: 25°18′N 83°01′E / 25.30°N 83.01°E / 25.30; 83.01Part of a series onHinduismHindu HistoryConceptsWorldview Hindu
Hindu
cosmology Puranic chronology Hindu
Hindu
mythologyGod / Highest RealityBrahman Ishvara God in Hinduism God and gender
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Yamuna
The Yamuna
Yamuna
(Hindustani: /jəmʊnaː/), also known as the Jumna, (not to be mistaken with the Jamuna of Bangladesh) is the longest and the second largest tributary river of the Ganges
Ganges
(Ganga) in northern India. Originating from the Yamunotri
Yamunotri
Glacier at a height of 6,387 metres on the south western slopes of Banderpooch peaks in the uppermost region of the Lower Himalaya in Uttarakhand, it travels a total length of 1,376 kilometres (855 mi) and has a drainage system of 366,223 square kilometres (141,399 sq mi), 40.2% of the entire Ganges
Ganges
Basin, before merging with the Ganges
Ganges
at Triveni Sangam, Allahabad, the site for the Kumbha Mela
Kumbha Mela
every twelve years
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Nadi (yoga)
Nāḍī (/ˈnɑːdi/; Sanskrit: नाडी, lit. 'tube, pipe'[1]; Tamil: நாடி, lit. 'nerve, blood vessel, pulse' ( listen)) is a term for the channels through which, in traditional Indian medicine and spiritual science, the energies of the physical body, the subtle body and the causal body are said to flow. Within this philosophical framework, the nadis are said to connect at special points of intensity called nadichakras.[2]Contents1 Introduction 2 Early references 3 Functions and activities3.1 Ida, Pingala and Sushumna4 Other traditions and interpretations4.1 Chinese 4.2 Tibetan 4.3 European5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 SourcesIntroduction[edit] Nadi is an important concept in Hindu philosophy, mentioned and described in the sources some of which have about 3,000 years of history. The amount of nadis of the human body are claimed to be up to hundred-of-thousands and even millions
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Prana
In Hindu philosophy
Hindu philosophy
including yoga, Indian medicine, and martial arts, Prana (प्राण, prāṇa; the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word for "life force" or "vital principle")[1] comprises all cosmic energy, permeating the Universe
Universe
on all levels. Prana is often referred to as the "life force" or "life energy".[not verified in body] It also includes energies present in inanimate objects.[not verified in body] In the Hindu literature, prana is sometimes described as originating from the Sun and connecting the elements of the Universe.[2] This life energy has been vividly invoked and described in the ancient Vedas
Vedas
and Upanishads.[not verified in body] In living beings, this universal energy is considered responsible for all bodily functions through five types of prana, collectively known as the five vāyus
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Carp
Carp
Carp
are various species of oily[1] freshwater fish from the family Cyprinidae, a very large group of fish native to Europe
Europe
and Asia.Contents1 Biology 2 Species 3 Recreational fishing 4 Aquaculture 5 Breeding 6 As ornamental fish 7 As food 8 List of carp-based dishes 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksBiology[edit] The cypriniformes (family Cyprinidae) are traditionally grouped with the Characiformes, Siluriformes, and Gymnotiformes
Gymnotiformes
to create the superorder Ostariophysi, since these groups share some common features. These features include being found predominantly in fresh water and possessing Weberian ossicles, an anatomical structure derived from the first five anterior-most vertebrae, and their corresponding ribs and neural crests. The third anterior-most pair of ribs is in contact with the extension of the labyrinth and the posterior with the swim bladder
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Sacred Lotus
Sacred lotus may refer to:Nelumbo nucifera - in Buddhism and Hinduism, and generally in Asia in and west of India Nymphaea caerulea - the "blue lotus" in Ancient Egyptian religion Nymphaea lotus - the "white lotus" in Ancient Egyptian religionSee also[edit]Lotus (other) Padma (attribute) - Nelumbo nucifera in Indian religionsThis page is an index of articles on plant species (or higher taxonomic groups) with the same common name (vernacular name)
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Śūnyatā
Śūnyatā
Śūnyatā
(Sanskrit; Pali: suññatā), translated into English most often as emptiness[1] and sometimes voidness,[2] is a Buddhist concept which has multiple meanings depending on its doctrinal context. It is either an ontological feature of reality, a meditation state, or a phenomenological analysis of experience. In Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism, suññatā often refers to the not-self (Pāli: anattā, Sanskrit: anātman)[note 1] nature of the five aggregates of experience and the six sense spheres
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Upādāna
Upādāna is a Vedic Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali
Pali
word that means "fuel, material cause, substrate that is the source and means for keepi
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Chakra
Chakras (Sanskrit: चक्र, IAST: cakra, Pali: cakka, lit. wheel, circle), are focal points in the subtle body used in a variety of meditation techniques in the esoteric traditions of Indian religions and used in new age medicine and psychology.[2][3][4] The concept is found particularly in the tantric traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism. They are treated as focal points, or psychic nodes in the subtle body of the practitioner
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