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ArXiv
arXiv (pronounced "archive")[2] is a repository of electronic preprints (known as e-prints) approved for publication after moderation, that consists of scientific papers in the fields of mathematics, physics, astronomy, computer science, quantitative biology, statistics, and quantitative finance, which can be accessed online. In many fields of mathematics and physics, almost all scientific papers are self-archived on the arXiv repository. Begun on August 14, 1991, arXiv.org passed the half-million article milestone on October 3, 2008,[3][4] and hit a million by the end of 2014.[5][6] By October 2016 the submission rate had grown to more than 10,000 per month.[6][7]Contents1 History 2 Peer review 3 Submission formats 4 Access 5 Copyright status of files 6 Controversy 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]A screenshot of the arXiv taken in 1994,[8] using the browser NCSA Mosaic
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Institute Of Physics
The Institute of Physics
Institute of Physics
(IOP) is a scientific charity that works to advance physics education, research and application.[4] It has a worldwide membership of over 50,000.[5] The IOP supports physics in education, research and industry.[6] In addition to this, the IOP provides services to its members including careers advice and professional development and grants the professional qualification of Chartered Physicist (CPhys), as well as
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MacArthur Fellowship
The MacArthur Fellows Program, MacArthur Fellowship, or "Genius Grant", is a prize awarded annually by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation typically to between 20 and 30 individuals, working in any field, who have shown "extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction" and are citizens or residents of the United States.[1] According to the Foundation's website, "the fellowship is not a reward for past accomplishment, but rather an investment in a person's originality, insight, and potential". The current prize is $625,000 paid over five years in quarterly installments. This figure was increased from $500,000 in 2013 with the release of a review[2] of the MacArthur Fellows Program. Since 1981, 942 people have been named MacArthur Fellows,[3] ranging in age from 18 to 82.[4] The award has been called "one of the most significant awards that is truly 'no strings attached'".[5] The Program allows no applications
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E-print
In academic publishing, an eprint or e-print is a digital version of a research document (usually a journal article, but could also be a thesis, conference paper, book chapter, or a book) that is accessible online, whether from a local institutional, or a central (subject- or discipline-based) digital repository.[1][2][3][4] When applied to journal articles, the term "eprints" covers both preprints (before peer review) and postprints (after peer review). Digital versions of materials other than research documents are not usually called e-prints, but some other name, such as e-books. See also[edit]Electronic article Electronic journal Electronic publishing Open accessReferences[edit]^ Harnad, S., Carr, L., Brody, T. and Oppenheim, C. (2003). "Mandated online RAE CVs linked to university eprint archives". Ariadne, 35. ^ Swan, A., Needham, P., Probets, S., Muir, A., Oppenheim, C., O’Brien, A., Hardy, R., Rowland, F. and Brown, S
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Quantitative Biology
Quantitative biology is an umbrella term encompassing the use of mathematical, statistical or computational techniques to study life and living organisms. The central theme and goal of quantitative biology is the creation of predictive models based on fundamental principles governing living systems.[1][2] The subfields of biology that employ quantitative approaches include:Mathematical and theoretical biology Computational biology Bioinformatics Biostatistics Systems biology Synthetic biology EpidemiologyReferences[edit]^ Howard, J. (2014-11-03). "Quantitative cell biology: the essential role of theory". Molecular Biology of the Cell. American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB). 25 (22): 3438–3440. doi:10.1091/mbc.e14-02-0715. ISSN 1059-1524.  ^ Hastings, Alan; Arzberger, Peter; Bolker, Ben; Collins, Scott; Ives, Anthony R.; Johnson, Norman A.; Palmer, Margaret A. (2005). "Quantitative Bioscience for the 21st Century". BioScience. Oxford University Press (OUP)
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Scientific Publishing
Scientific literature comprises scholarly publications that report original empirical and theoretical work in the natural and social sciences, and within an academic field, often abbreviated as the literature. Academic publishing is the process of contributing the results of one's research into the literature, which often requires a peer-review process. Original scientific research published for the first time in scientific journals is called the primary literature. Patents and technical reports, for minor research results and engineering and design work (including computer software), can also be considered primary literature
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Open Access (publishing)
Access
Access
may refer to:Contents1 Companies and organizations 2 Sailing 3 Television 4 Other uses 5 See alsoCompanies and organizations[edit]ACCESS (Australia), an Australian youth network Access
Access
(credit card), a former credit card company
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Mathematician
A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics in his or her work, typically to solve mathematical problems. Mathematics
Mathematics
is concerned with numbers, data, quantity, structure, space, models, and change.Contents1 History 2 Required education 3 Activities3.1 Applied mathematics 3.2 Abstract mathematics 3.3 Mathematics
Mathematics
teaching 3.4 Consulting4 Occupations 5 Quotations about mathematicians 6 Prizes in mathematics 7 Mathematical autobiographies 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory This section is on the history of mathematicians
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Peer Review
Peer review
Peer review
is the evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work (peers). It constitutes a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review
Peer review
methods are employed to maintain standards of quality, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review
Peer review
can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review.Contents1 Professional 2 Scholarly 3 Government policy 4 Medical 5 See also 6 ReferencesProfessional[edit] Professional peer review focuses on the performance of professionals, with a view to improving quality, upholding standards, or providing certification
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Chronicle Of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
is a newspaper and website that presents news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and Student Affairs
Student Affairs
professionals (staff members and administrators). A subscription is required to read some articles.[5] The Chronicle, based in Washington, D.C., is a major news service in United States academic affairs. It is published every weekday online and appears weekly in print except for every other week in June, July, and August and the last three weeks in December (a total of 42 issues a year)
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FTP
The File
File
Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used for the transfer of computer files between a client and server on a computer network. FTP is built on a client-server model architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and the server.[1] FTP users may authenticate themselves with a clear-text sign-in protocol, normally in the form of a username and password, but can connect anonymously if the server is configured to allow it. For secure transmission that protects the username and password, and encrypts the content, FTP is often secured with SSL/TLS (FTPS)
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Electronic Submission
An electronic submission refers to a manuscript submitted by electronic means: that is, via e-mail or a web form on the Internet, or on an electronic medium such as a compact disc, a hard disk or a USB flash drive.[1] Traditionally, a manuscript referred to anything that was explicitly "written by hand". However, in popular usage and especially in the context of computers and the Internet, the term "manuscript" may even refer to documents (text or otherwise) typed out or prepared on typewriters and computers and can be extended to digital photographs and videos, and online surveys too
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Fields Medal
The Fields Medal
Fields Medal
is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians under 40 years of age at the International Congress of the International Mathematical Union (IMU), a meeting that takes place every four years (on even years). The Fields Medal
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Millennium Prize Problems
The Millennium Prize Problems are seven problems in mathematics that were stated by the Clay Mathematics Institute in 2000. The problems are the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture, Hodge conjecture, Navier–Stokes existence and smoothness, P versus NP problem, Poincaré conjecture, Riemann hypothesis, and Yang–Mills existence and mass gap
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Fermat's Last Theorem
In number theory, Fermat's Last Theorem
Fermat's Last Theorem
(sometimes called Fermat's conjecture, especially in older texts) states that no three positive integers a, b, and c satisfy the equation an + bn = cn for any integer value of n greater than 2. The cases n = 1 and n = 2 have been known to have infinitely many solutions since antiquity.[1] This theorem was first conjectured by Pierre de Fermat
Pierre de Fermat
in 1637 in the margin of a copy of Arithmetica
Arithmetica
where he claimed he had a proof that was too large to fit in the margin. The first successful proof was released in 1994 by Andrew Wiles, and formally published in 1995, after 358 years of effort by mathematicians
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