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ArXiv
The ARXIV (pronounced "archive ") is a repository of electronic preprints , known as e-prints , of scientific papers in the fields of mathematics , physics , astronomy , computer science , quantitative biology , statistics , and quantitative finance, which can be accessed online. In many fields of mathematics and physics, almost all scientific papers are self-archived on the arXiv repository. Begun on August 14, 1991, arXiv.org passed the half-million article milestone on October 3, 2008, and hit a million by the end of 2014. By 2014 the submission rate had grown to more than 8,000 per month. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Peer review
Peer review
* 3 Submission formats * 4 Access * 5 Copyright status of files * 6 See also * 7 Notes * 8 References * 9 External links HISTORY A screenshot of the arXiv taken in 1994, using the browser NCSA Mosaic . At the time, HTML forms were a new technology
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Scientific Publishing
SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE comprises scholarly publications that report original empirical and theoretical work in the natural and social sciences , and within an academic field, often abbreviated as THE LITERATURE. Academic publishing is the process of contributing the results of one's research into the literature, which often requires a peer-review process. Original scientific research published for the first time in scientific journals is called the primary literature . Patents and technical reports , for minor research results and engineering and design work (including computer software), can also be considered primary literature. Secondary sources include review articles (which summarize the findings of published studies to highlight advances and new lines of research) and books (for large projects or broad arguments, including compilations of articles). Tertiary sources might include encyclopedias and similar works intended for broad public consumption
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Mathematician
A MATHEMATICIAN is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics in his or her work, typically to solve mathematical problems . Mathematics
Mathematics
is concerned with numbers , data , quantity , structure , space , models , and change . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Required education * 3 Activities * 3.1 Applied mathematics
Applied mathematics
* 3.2 Abstract mathematics * 3.3 Mathematics
Mathematics
teaching * 3.4 Consulting * 4 Occupations * 5 Quotations about mathematicians * 6 Prizes in mathematics * 7 Mathematical autobiographies * 8 See also * 9 Notes * 10 References * 11 Further reading * 12 External links HISTORY This section is on the history of mathematicians
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Peer Review
PEER REVIEW is the evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work (peers). It constitutes a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field . Peer review
Peer review
methods are employed to maintain standards of quality, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia , scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper 's suitability for publication . Peer review can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review . CONTENTS * 1 Professional * 2 Scholarly * 3 Government policy * 4 Medical * 5 See also * 6 References PROFESSIONALProfessional peer review focuses on the performance of professionals, with a view to improving quality, upholding standards, or providing certification
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MacArthur Fellowship
The MACARTHUR FELLOWS PROGRAM, MACARTHUR FELLOWSHIP, or "GENIUS GRANT", is a prize awarded annually by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation typically to between 20 and 30 individuals, working in any field, who have shown "extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction" and are citizens or residents of the United States
United States
. According to the Foundation's website, "the fellowship is not a reward for past accomplishment, but rather an investment in a person's originality, insight, and potential". The current prize is $625,000 paid over five years in quarterly installments. This figure was increased from $500,000 in 2013 with the release of a review of the MacArthur Fellows Program. Since 1981, 942 people have been named MacArthur Fellows, ranging in age from 18 to 82. The award has been called "one of the most significant awards that is truly 'no strings attached'"
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Mirror Website
MIRROR WEBSITES or MIRRORS are replicas of other websites . The main purpose of mirrors is often reduced network traffic , improved access speed , or improved availability of the original site. Such websites have different URLs than the original, but host identical content to it Mirrors can also serve as real-time backups. CONTENTS * 1 Examples * 2 Malicious mirrors * 3 See also * 4 References EXAMPLESExamples of websites with notable mirrors are KickassTorrents
KickassTorrents
, The Pirate Bay
The Pirate Bay
WikiLeaks
WikiLeaks
, the website of the Environmental Protection Agency and . MALICIOUS MIRRORS See also: Cybercrime
Cybercrime
and Internet manipulation There are known cases of mirror websites which attempt to gain sensitive information of or distribute malware to its users
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Quantitative Biology
QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY is an umbrella term encompassing the use of mathematical, statistical or computational techniques to study life and living organisms . The central theme and goal of quantitative biology is the creation of predictive models based on fundamental principles governing living systems . The subfields of biology that employ quantitative approaches include: * Mathematical and theoretical biology * Computational biology
Computational biology
* Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics
* Biostatistics * Systems biology
Systems biology
* Synthetic biology * Epidemiology
Epidemiology
REFERENCES * ^ Howard, J. (2014-11-03). "Quantitative cell biology: the essential role of theory". Molecular Biology
Biology
of the Cell. American Society for Cell Biology
Biology
(ASCB). 25 (22): 3438–3440
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Gopher (protocol)
The GOPHER protocol /ˈɡoʊfər/ is a TCP/IP application layer protocol designed for distributing, searching, and retrieving documents over the Internet. The Gopher protocol was strongly oriented towards a menu-document design and presented an alternative to the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in its early stages , but ultimately Hypertext
Hypertext
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) became the dominant protocol. The Gopher ecosystem is often regarded as the effective predecessor of the World Wide Web. The protocol was invented by a team led by Mark P. McCahill at the University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
. It offers some features not natively supported by the Web and imposes a much stronger hierarchy on information stored on it
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World Wide Web
The WORLD WIDE WEB (abbreviated WWW or THE WEB) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and can be accessed via the Internet
Internet
. English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1989. He wrote the first web browser computer program in 1990 while employed at CERN
CERN
in Switzerland. The Web browser
Web browser
was released outside CERN
CERN
in 1991, first to other research institutions starting in January 1991 and to the general public on the Internet
Internet
in August 1991. The World Wide Web
World Wide Web
has been central to the development of the Information Age and is the primary tool billions of people use to interact on the Internet
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E-print
In academic publishing , an EPRINT or E-PRINT is a digital version of a research document (usually a journal article, but could also be a thesis , conference paper, book chapter, or a book) that is accessible online, whether from a local institutional , or a central (subject- or discipline-based) digital repository . When applied to journal articles, the term "eprints" covers both preprints (before peer review ) and postprints (after peer review). Digital versions of materials other than research documents are not usually called e-prints, but some other name, such as e-books . SEE ALSO * Electronic article * Electronic journal * Electronic publishing * Open access REFERENCES * ^ Harnad, S., Carr, L., Brody, T. and Oppenheim, C. (2003). "Mandated online RAE CVs linked to university eprint archives". Ariadne, 35. * ^ Swan, A., Needham, P., Probets, S., Muir, A., Oppenheim, C., O’Brien, A., Hardy, R., Rowland, F. and Brown, S
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Chronicle Of Higher Education
THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION is a newspaper and website that presents news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and Student Affairs
Student Affairs
professionals (staff members and administrators). A subscription is required to read some articles. The Chronicle, based in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
, is a major news service in United States academic affairs. It is published every weekday online and appears weekly in print except for every other week in June, July, and August and the last three weeks in December (a total of 42 issues a year). In print, The Chronicle is published in two sections: section A with news and job listings, and section B, The Chronicle Review, a magazine of arts and ideas
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Electronic Submission
An ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION refers to a manuscript submitted by electronic means: that is, via e-mail or a web form on the Internet
Internet
, or on an electronic medium such as a compact disc , a hard disk or a USB flash drive
USB flash drive
. Traditionally, a manuscript referred to anything that was explicitly "written by hand". However, in popular usage and especially in the context of computers and the Internet, the term "manuscript" may even refer to documents (text or otherwise) typed out or prepared on typewriters and computers and can be extended to digital photographs and videos, and online surveys too. In other words, any manuscript prepared and submitted online can be considered to be an electronic submission
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Word Processor
A WORD PROCESSOR is an electronic device or computer software application , that performs the task of composing, editing, formatting, and printing of documents. The word processor was a stand-alone office machine in the 1960s, combining the keyboard text-entry and printing functions of an electric typewriter , with a recording unit, either tape or floppy disk (as used by the Wang machine) with a simple dedicated computer processor for the editing of text. Although features and designs varied among manufacturers and models, and new features were added as technology advanced, word processors typically featured a monochrome display and the ability to save documents on memory cards or diskettes . Later models introduced innovations such as spell-checking programs, and improved formatting options
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University Of California, Davis
The UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS (also referred to as UCD, UC DAVIS, or DAVIS), is a public research university and land-grant university as well as one of the 10 campuses of the University of California
California
(UC) system. It is located in Davis, California , just west of Sacramento
Sacramento
, and has the third-largest enrollment in the UC System after UCLA
UCLA
and UC Berkeley . The university has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies ," a publicly funded university considered to provide a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League
Ivy League
. The Carnegie Foundation classifies UC Davis as a comprehensive doctoral research university with a medical program, and very high research activity
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Institute Of Physics
The INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS (IOP) is a scientific charity that works to advance physics education , research and application . It has a worldwide membership of over 50,000. The IOP supports physics in education, research and industry. In addition to this, the IOP provides services to its members including careers advice and professional development and grants the professional qualification of Chartered Physicist (CPhys), as well as Chartered Engineer (CEng) as a nominated body of the Engineering Council . The IOP's publishing company, IOP Publishing , publishes more than 70 academic journals and magazines. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Membership * 3 Professional qualifications * 4 Education * 5 Publishing * 6 Governance * 7 Awards * 8 Headquarters * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links HISTORY John Hall Gladstone, the first President of the Physical Society of London
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PDF
The PORTABLE DOCUMENT FORMAT (PDF) is a file format used to present documents in a manner independent of application software , hardware , and operating systems . Each PDF file encapsulates a complete description of a fixed-layout flat document, including the text, fonts , graphics, and other information needed to display it
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