HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Foobar
The terms foobar (/ˈfbɑːr/), foo, bar, and others are used as metasyntactic variables and placeholder names in computer programming or computer-related documentation.[1] They have been used to name entities such as variables, functions, and commands whose exact identity is unimportant and serve only to demonstrate a concept. The etymology of foobar could be derived from the military slang from the World War II era FUBAR, which was bowdlerised to foobar.[2] The word foo on its own was used earlier
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Forward Air Control
Forward air control is the provision of guidance to close air support (CAS)[1] aircraft intended to ensure that their attack hits the intended target and does not injure friendly troops. This task is carried out by a forward air controller (FAC).[2] A primary forward air control function is ensuring the safety of friendly troops during close air support. Enemy targets in the front line ("Forward Edge of the Battle Area" in US terminology) are often close to friendly forces and therefore friendly forces are at risk of friendly fire through proximity during air attack. The danger is twofold: the bombing pilot cannot identify the target clearly, and is not aware of the locations of friendly forces. Camouflage, a constantly changing situation and the fog of war all increase the risk
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Field Artillery Team
In the land-based field artillery, the field artillery team is organized to direct and control indirect artillery fire on the battlefield. Since World War I, to conduct indirect artillery fire, three distinct components have evolved in this organization: the forward observer (FO), the Fire Direction Center (FDC) and the Firing Unit, sometimes referred to as the gun line. On the battlefield, the field artillery team consists of some combinations of all of these elements. In other words, there may be multiple FOs calling in fire on multiple targets to multiple FDCs and any component may be in communication with some of the other elements depending on the situational requirements.[1] Modern artillery batteries shoot at targets measured in distances of kilometers and miles, a hundredfold increase in range over 18th century guns[citation needed]
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Air Observation Post
Air Observation Post (AOP) is an aeroplane or helicopter used in the role of artillery spotter by the British Army and Commonwealth forces. In this role, either the pilot of the aircraft or another crew member acts as an observer watching for targets on the ground, and/or as a Forward Observation Officer directing the fire, by radio, of artillery on the ground (or calling in tactical ground-attack aircraft).[1] In the interwar period, the role of artillery spotting was mixed with reconnaissance and ground attack to be served by Army Co-operation (AC) squadrons. At the beginning of World War II their standard aircraft was the Westland Lysander. This aircraft had a high level of losses with the British Expeditionary Force during the Battle of France (118 shot down out of a total of 175 deployed). This demonstrated the unsuitability of the Lysander for Army Co-operation and called into question the whole concept
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

M4 Sherman

 Tanks portal