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Arthur S. Link
Arthur Stanley Link (August 8, 1920 in New Market, Virginia
New Market, Virginia
– March 26, 1998 in Advance, North Carolina)[1] was an American historian and educator, known as the leading authority on U.S. President Woodrow Wilson.Contents1 Biography 2 Notable quotations 3 Works 4 External links 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born in New Market, Va., 50 miles from Wilson's birthplace in Staunton, Virginia, to a Lutheran minister of German descent, Link graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, receiving a B.A. in 1941 and a Ph.D. in 1945, getting inspired to look into the career of Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
career by Fletcher Green, one of his professors
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Eric F. Goldman
Eric Frederick Goldman (June 17, 1916 – February 19, 1989) was an American historian, Rollins Professor of History at Princeton University, and Presidential advisor.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Awards 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Born in Washington, D.C., United States, he was educated in public schools in Baltimore, Maryland, and graduated from Johns Hopkins University with a Ph.D. in history at age 22. He wrote on national affairs for TIME magazine. He joined Princeton University
Princeton University
as an assistant professor in 1942. He became a full professor in 1955, until retirement in 1985. He was special advisor to President Lyndon B. Johnson from 1963 to 1966.[2] He served as president of the Society of American Historians from 1962 to 1969.[3] From 1959 to 1967, he was the moderator of the public affairs show The Open Mind, on NBC.[1] He married Joanna R. Jackson (died 1980)
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Michael T. Kaufman
Michael T. Kaufman (March 23, 1938 – January 15, 2010) was a writer for The New York Times. He won the 1978 George Polk Award for foreign reporting for coverage of Africa.[1]Contents1 Personal 2 Career 3 Works 4 Death 5 References 6 External linksPersonal[edit] Kaufman was born in Paris
Paris
as the only child of Adam and Pauline Kaufman. Pauline was a teacher and Adam was an economist. In 1940, when the Nazis invaded France, the Kaufman family moved to Spain and in 1941 sailed from Lisbon to New York. He grew up in Manhattan and at age 13, sold ice cream. He graduated from the Bronx High School of Science in 1954 and obtained his degree to City College in 1959.[2] He was married to Rebecca in 1960 and the couple had two sons and a daughter.[citation needed] Career[edit] After graduating college, Kaufman taught school in Harlem but quit after a few months to become a copy boy at the Times in 1959
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Versailles Peace Conference
The Paris
Paris
Peace Conference, also known as Versailles Peace Conference, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I
World War I
to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers. Involving diplomats from 32 countries and nationalities, the major or main decisions were the creation of the League of Nations, as well as the five peace treaties with the defeated states; the awarding of German and Ottoman overseas possessions as "mandates", chiefly to Britain and France; reparations imposed on Germany; and the drawing of new national boundaries (sometimes with plebiscites) to better reflect ethnic boundaries. The main result was the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
with Germany, which in section 231 laid the guilt for the war on "the aggression of Germany and her allies"
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George F. Kennan
George Frost Kennan (February 16, 1904 – March 17, 2005) was an American diplomat and historian. He was known best as an advocate of a policy of containment of Soviet expansion during the Cold War
Cold War
on which he later reversed himself. He lectured widely and wrote scholarly histories of the relations between USSR
USSR
and the United States. He was also one of the group of foreign policy elders known as "The Wise Men". During the late 1940s, his writings inspired the Truman Doctrine
Truman Doctrine
and the U.S. foreign policy
U.S. foreign policy
of "containing" the Soviet Union. His "Long Telegram" from Moscow
Moscow
during 1946 and the subsequent 1947 article "The Sources of Soviet Conduct" argued that the Soviet regime was inherently expansionist and that its influence had to be "contained" in areas of vital strategic importance to the United States
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Northwestern University
Northwestern University
University
(NU) is a private research university based in Evanston, Illinois, United States, with other campuses located in Chicago
Chicago
and Doha, Qatar, and academic programs and facilities in Washington, D.C
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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New Market, Virginia
New Market is a town in Shenandoah County, Virginia, United States. It had a population of 2,146 at the 2010 census
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Woodrow Wilson Foundation
The Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
Foundation was an educational non-profit created in 1921, organized under the laws of New York, for the "perpetuation of Wilson's ideals" via periodic grants to worthy groups and individuals. Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
was the chair of the group's governing National Committee, coordinating fundraising activity of parallel groups in each of the 48 states. The group sought to gather a $1 million endowment fund, the interest on which was to pay for the group's cash awards. A national fundraising drive to raise the endowment was launched on January 16, 1922, but despite extensive organization and relentless publicity only half the financial target was raised by February 15
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Bill Bradley
William Warren Bradley (born July 28, 1943) is an American former professional basketball player and politician. He served three terms as a Democratic U.S. Senator from New Jersey. He ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic Party's nomination for President in the 2000 election. Bradley was born and raised in Crystal City, Missouri, a small town 45 miles south of St. Louis. He excelled at basketball from an early age. He did well academically and was an all-county and all-state basketball player in high school. He was offered 75 college scholarships, but declined them all to attend Princeton University. He earned a gold medal as a member of the 1964 Olympic basketball team and was the NCAA
NCAA
Player of the Year in 1965, when Princeton finished third in the NCAA
NCAA
Tournament
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Versailles Treaty
The Treaty of Versailles
Versailles
(French: Traité de Versailles) was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I
World War I
to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand which directly lead to World War I. The other Central Powers
Central Powers
on the German side of World War I
World War I
signed separate treaties.[8] Although the armistice, signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of Allied negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty
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Princeton, New Jersey
Princeton is a municipality with a borough form of government in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, that was established in its current form on January 1, 2013, through the consolidation of the Borough of Princeton and Princeton Township. As of the 2010 United States Census, the municipality's population was 28,572, reflecting the former township's population of 16,265, along with the 12,307 in the former borough.[7][8][9][10][11] Princeton was founded before the American Revolution
American Revolution
and is best known as the home of Princeton University, located in the community since 1756
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John Milton Cooper, Jr.
John Milton Cooper, Jr. (born 1940) is an American historian, author, and educator. His specialization is late 19th- and early 20th-century American Diplomatic History. Cooper is Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.[1] His most recent book, Woodrow Wilson: A Biography, was published in 2009
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Oxford University
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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Anthony Trollope
Anthony Trollope
Anthony Trollope
(/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters.[1] Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life,[2] but he had regained the esteem of critics by the mid-20th century.Contents1 Biography1.1 Move to Ireland 1.2 Early works 1.3 Success as an author 1.4 Return to England 1.5 Beverley campaign 1.6 Later years2 Death 3 Works and reputation 4 List of works4.1 Articles 4.2 Letters5 Notes 6 References 7 Bibliography7.1 Further reading8 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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