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Arthur L. Strum
Arthur Leander Strum (March 5, 1894 – August 12, 1947) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Northern Normal and Industrial School—now known was Northern State University—in Aberdeen, South Dakota
Aberdeen, South Dakota
in 1916, at Oshkosh State Normal School—now known as the University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh—in 1919, and three stints at Indiana State Teachers College—now known as Indiana State University
Indiana State University
(1923–1926, 1932, 1942), compiling a career college football coaching record of 30–25–2
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
The Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WIAC) is a college athletic conference that competes in the NCAA's Division III. As the name implies, member teams are located in the state of Wisconsin, although there are three associate members from Minnesota
Minnesota
and one from Michigan
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Open Access
Open access
Open access
(OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g
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Newspapers.com
Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com
LLC is a privately held online company based in Lehi, Utah, United States. The largest for-profit genealogy company in the world, it operates a network of genealogical, historical record and genetic genealogy websites. As of June 2014, the company claims to provide access to approximately 16 billion historical records, and have over 2 million paying subscribers and, as of February 2018, more than seven million AncestryDNA customers.[5][6][non-primary source needed] The company also claims that its user-generated content tallies to more than 70 million family trees, and that subscribers have added more than 200 million photographs, scanned documents, and written stories.[7][non-primary source needed] Under its subsidiaries, Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com
operates foreign sites that provide access to services and records specific to other countries in the languages of those countries
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Associated Press
The Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association. The AP is owned by its contributing newspapers and radio and television stations in the United States, all of which contribute stories to the AP and use material written by its staff journalists. AP's mission is to inform the world with accurate, fair, unbiased reporting. Its Statement of News Values and Principles[3] spells out its standards and practices. AP has earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes, including 31 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. AP has counted the vote in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures
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Seymour, Indiana
Seymour is a city in Jackson County, Indiana, United States. The population was 17,503 at the 2010 census. Seymour is referred to as the "Crossroads of America" due to the north/south and east/west railroads intersecting downtown. The north/south line (the Jeffersonville, Madison and Indianapolis Railroad) was built in the 1840s and connected Indianapolis
Indianapolis
to the Ohio River at Jeffersonville. In 1852, Capt. Meedy Shields
Meedy Shields
persuaded John Seymour into building the east/west railroad (the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad) through his land. In return, Shields named the area Seymour. Seymour is the birthplace of singer John Cougar Mellencamp, former Indiana
Indiana
9th District U.S
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The Tribune (Seymour)
The Tribune is an American daily newspaper published Mondays through Saturdays in Seymour, Indiana. It is owned by Home News Enterprises. It covers the city of Seymour and all of Jackson County, Indiana. History[edit] Founded as the Seymour Daily Republican in 1885,[1] the newspaper adopted the name Seymour Daily Tribune in 1920, shortening it to The Tribune on September 10, 1994.[3] More recently, the newspaper was owned by Freedom Communications, based in Orange County, California, at one point the 12th largest media conglomerate in the United States. Freedom declared bankruptcy in 2009 and, over the next three years, sold all of its television stations and its newspapers east of the Rocky Mountains, including The Tribune. The Tribune's buyer was Home News Enterprises, a family business based in Columbus, Indiana, in Bartholomew County, which adjoins Jackson County to the north
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Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
is a limited-contact sport played on a rectangular court. While most often played as a team sport with five players on each side, three-on-three, two-on-two, and one-on-one competitions are also common. The objective is to shoot a basketball (approximately 9.4 inches (24 cm) in diameter) through a hoop 18 inches (46 cm) in diameter and 10 feet (3.048 m) high that is mounted to a backboard at each end of the court. The game was invented in 1891 by Dr. James Naismith. A team can score a field goal by shooting the ball through the basket being defended by the opposition team during regular play. A field goal scores three points for the shooting team if the player shoots from behind the three-point line, and two points if shot from in front of the line. A team can also score via free throws, which are worth one point, after the other team is assessed with certain fouls
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Indiana Intercollegiate Conference
The Indiana
Indiana
Intercollegiate Conference (IIC) was a college athletic conference in the United States
United States
from 1922 to 1950. It consisted of schools in Indiana. The charter members of the conference were Indiana
Indiana
State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Franklin, Hanover College
Hanover College
and Rose-Hulman. The following year, University of Indianapolis
University of Indianapolis
and Ball State University joined. By the late 1940s, virtually every Indiana
Indiana
college; private or public was a member
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1932 College Football Season
The 1932 NCAA football season saw the Michigan Wolverines win the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy as national champion under the Dickinson System
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1926 College Football Season
The 1926 NCAA football season was the first in which an attempt was made to recognize a national champion after the season. Stanford University, coached by Pop Warner, was the #1 team in the nation under the new Dickinson System and awarded the Rissman Trophy. Unbeaten Stanford (10-0) faced unbeaten Alabama (9-0) in the Rose Bowl at Pasadena and the two teams played to a 7-7 tie. Meanwhile, Parke H. Davis, a renowned football historian and football rules committee member, declared Lafayette College
Lafayette College
(9-0) national champions in Spalding's Football Guide
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1925 College Football Season
The 1925 NCAA football season was the last season before attempts were made to recognize a national champion in college football. The season ended with two undefeated teams staking a claim as best in the nation: Dartmouth at 8-0, led by halfback Andy Oberlander, who passed for 14 touchdowns and ran for 12,[1] and University of Alabama at 10-0, heralding the Crimson Tide's arrival as a football powerhouse. Tulane also went undefeated, led by the nation's leading scorer in halfback Peggy Flournoy.[2] The Rose Bowl was closer to a national championship game than had been seen previously, providing an intersectional matchup between two unbeaten teams, the Washington Huskies (10-0-1) and the Alabama Crimson Tide (9-0). In a thriller, Alabama won the first Rose Bowl for a southern team by a point, 20-19
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1924 College Football Season
The 1924 NCAA football season was the year of the Four Horsemen as the Notre Dame team, coached by Knute Rockne, won all of its games, including the Rose Bowl, to be acclaimed as the best team in the nation. Notre Dame and Stanford were both unbeaten at season's end, with the Fighting Irish winning the Rose Bowl contest 27-10. The Penn Quakers were retroactively awarded a national championship by Parke H. Davis.[1] Red Grange's Illinois team upset Michigan. The Illini were upset by Minnesota, which in turn was upset by Vanderbilt. Fred Russell's Fifty Years of Vanderbilt Football dubs 1924 "the most eventful season in the history of Vanderbilt football." Centre claimed a southern title in its last season of national relevance, upsetting Wallace Wade's first SoCon champion Alabama team
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1923 College Football Season
The 1923 NCAA football season saw several teams finish their seasons unbeaten and untied. As such, numerous schools claim a national championship for the 1923 season. Illinois (coached by Bob Zuppke) and Michigan (coached by Fielding "Hurry-Up" Yost), both members of what is now the Big Ten Conference, finished with records of 8–0 and were selected as national champion by multiple selectors
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1919 College Football Season
The 1919 NCAA football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
Football Records Book listing Centre, Harvard, Illinois, Notre Dame, and Texas A&M as having been deemed national champions by major selectors[1] Only Harvard, Illinois, and Texas A&M claim national championships for the 1919 season
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