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Art Eggleton
Arthur C. "Art" Eggleton, PC (born September 29, 1943) is a Canadian Senator representing Ontario. He was the longest serving Mayor of Toronto, leading the city from 1980 to 1991. Eggleton has held several federal government posts, including President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Infrastructure from 1993–1996, Minister for International Trade from 1996–1997, and Minister of National Defense from 1997 until 2002.Contents1 City council 2 As Mayor of Toronto 3 Member of Parliament 4 Senator for Ontario 5 References 6 External linksCity council[edit] Eggleton, an accountant by profession, was first elected to Toronto city council in 1969. He served as budget chief in the council elected in 1973 under David Crombie
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The Honourable
The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable (abbreviated to The Hon., Hon. or formerly The Hon'ble—the latter term is still used in South Asia) is a style that is used before the names of certain classes of people. It is considered to be an honorific styling, and it is only used for living people. American protocol expert Robert Hickey says, "The courtesy title The Honorable is used when addressing or listing the name of a living person. When the name of a deceased person is listed it is just (Full Name) + Office Held."[1] The 2016 Bloomsbury guide to titles and forms of address states that the title 'honourable' in English speaking countries is "held for life or during tenure of office."[2] The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage by Allan M. Siegal (1999), p
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Canadian Federal Election, 1997
Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister-designate Jean Chrétien LiberalThe Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada
Canada
of the 36th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister Jean Chrétien's Liberal Party of Canada
Canada
won a second majority government. The Reform Party of Canada
Canada
replaced the Bloc Québécois
Bloc Québécois
as the Official Opposition. The election results closely followed the pattern of the 1993 election. The Liberals swept Ontario, while a divided Bloc managed to win a reduced majority in Quebec. Reform made sufficient gains in the West to allow Preston Manning
Preston Manning
to become Leader of the Official Opposition, but lost its only seat east of Manitoba
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Progressive Conservative Party Of Canada
The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada
Conservative Party of Canada
(French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) (PC) was a federal political party in Canada
Canada
with a centre-right stance on economic issues and, after the 1970s, a centrist stance on social issues. The party pre-dates confederation in 1867, when it accepted many conservative-leaning former members of the Liberal Party into its ranks. At confederation, the Liberal-Conservative Party
Liberal-Conservative Party
of Canada became Canada's first governing party under Sir John A. Macdonald, and for years was either the governing party of Canada
Canada
or the largest opposition party. The party changed its name to the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada
Conservative Party of Canada
upon its merger with the Progressive Party of Canada
Canada
in December 1942
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Vuk Stefanović Karadžić
Vuk Stefanović Karadžić
Karadžić
(pronounced [ʋûːk stefǎːnoʋitɕ kâradʒitɕ], Serbian Cyrillic: Вук Стефановић Караџић; 7 November 1787 – 7 February 1864) was a Serbian philologist and linguist who was the major reformer of the Serbian language. He deserves, perhaps, for his collections of songs, fairy tales, and riddles, to be called the father of the study of Serbian folklore. He was also the author of the first Serbian dictionary in the new reformed language. In addition, he translated the New Testament into the reformed form of the Serbian spelling and language. He was well known abroad and familiar to Jacob Grimm, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Goethe
and historian Leopold von Ranke
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Metro Toronto Convention Centre
Metro Toronto
Toronto
Convention Centre (originally and still colloquially Metro Convention Centre,[1][2][3] and sometimes MTCC), is a convention complex located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada along Front Street West in the former Railway Lands
Railway Lands
in Downtown Toronto. The property is today owned by Oxford Properties. The centre is operated by the Metropolitan Toronto
Toronto
Convention Centre Corporation, an independent agency of the Government of Ontario.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Events 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] The MTCC has 600,000 square feet (56,000 m2) of space, and is home to the 1330-seat John Bassett Theatre
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Rogers Centre
Rogers Centre, originally named SkyDome, is a multi-purpose stadium in Downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated just southwest of the CN Tower near the northern shore of Lake Ontario. Opened in 1989 on the former Railway Lands, it is home to the Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays of Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB). Previously, the stadium was home to the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League
Canadian Football League
(CFL) and the Toronto Raptors of the National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
(NBA)
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Canadian Broadcasting Centre
The Canadian Broadcasting Centre, located in Toronto, Ontario, is the broadcast headquarters and master control point for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's English-language television and radio services. It also contains studios for local and regional French language productions and is also home to the North American Broadcasters Association. Its French language
French language
counterpart is the Maison Radio-Canada, located in Montreal. The Canadian Broadcasting Centre
Canadian Broadcasting Centre
is located at 250 Front Street West in Downtown Toronto, directly across from the Metro Toronto
Toronto
Convention Centre
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Canadian Federal Election, 1993
Kim Campbell Progressive ConservativePrime Minister-designate Jean Chrétien LiberalThe Canadian federal election of 1993 (officially, the 35th general election) was held on Monday October 25 of that year to elect members to the House of Commons of Canada
Canada
of the 35th Parliament of Canada. Fourteen parties competed for the 295 seats in the House at that time. It was one of the most eventful elections in Canada's history, with more than half of the electorate switching parties from the 1988 election. The Liberals, led by Jean Chrétien, won a strong majority in the House and formed the next government of Canada. The election was called on Wednesday September 8, 1993, by the new Progressive Conservative Party leader, Prime Minister Kim Campbell, near the end of her party's five-year mandate. When she assumed office, the party was deeply unpopular, and was further weakened by the emergence of new parties that were competing for its core supporters
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Infrastructure Canada
Infrastructure Canada is a Canadian federal department responsible for public infrastructure in the country. The department is headed by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities.Contents1 History1.1 Programs2 Branches and sub-agencies 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Office of Infrastructure of Canada (Infrastructure Canada) was created as a separate organization in 2002 under the Financial Administration Act.[1] The department was created to undertake infrastructure programs in the country.[1] There are two programs managed by the department that have their own federal legislation: the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, and the Gas Tax Fund.[1] Programs[edit] Infrastructure Canada is the lead federal department responsible for infrastructure policy development and program delivery
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Legislative Seat
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
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NATO
"A mind unfettered in deliberation" "L'esprit libre dans la consultation"[2]Formation 4 April 1949; 69 years ago (1949-04-04)Type Military allianceHeadquarters Brussels, BelgiumMembership29 states Albania Belgium Bulgaria Canada Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Italy Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg Montenegro Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Turkey United Kingdom United StatesOfficial languageEnglish French[3]Secretary GeneralJens StoltenbergChairman of the NATO
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By-election
By-elections, also spelled bye-elections (known as special elections in the United States, and bypolls in India), are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections. In most cases these elections occur after the incumbent dies or resigns, but they also occur when the incumbent becomes ineligible to continue in office (because of a recall, ennoblement, criminal conviction, or failure to maintain a minimum attendance). Less commonly, these elections have been called when a constituency election is invalidated by voting irregularities. In the United States, these contests have been called "special elections" because they do not always occur on Election
Election
Day like regular congressional elections
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Canadian Federal Election, 2000
Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister-designate Jean Chrétien LiberalMap of Canada, showing the results of the 2000 election by riding.The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament of the House of Commons of Canada
Canada
of the 37th Parliament of Canada. Since the previous election of 1997, small-"c" conservatives had begun attempts to merge the Reform Party of Canada
Canada
and Progressive Conservative Party of Canada
Canada
as part of the United Alternative
United Alternative
agenda. During that time, Jean Charest
Jean Charest
stepped down as leader of the Progressive Conservatives and former Prime Minister Joe Clark
Joe Clark
took over the party and opposed any union with the Reform Party
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Ombudsman
An ombudsman, ombud, or public advocate is an official who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints of maladministration or a violation of rights. The ombudsman is usually appointed by the government or by parliament, but with a significant degree of independence. In some countries an inspector general, citizen advocate or other official may have duties similar to those of a national ombudsman, and may also be appointed by a legislature. Below the national level an ombudsman may be appointed by a state, local or municipal government. Unofficial ombudsmen may be appointed by, or even work for, a corporation such as a utility supplier, newspaper, NGO, or professional regulatory body. The typical duties of an ombudsman are to investigate complaints and attempt to resolve them, usually through recommendations (binding or not) or mediation
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Compensation And Benefits
Compensation and benefits (abbreviated “C&B”) is a sub-discipline of human resources, focused on employee compensation and benefits policy-making. While compensation and benefits are tangible, there are intangible rewards such as recognition, work-life and development. Combined, these are referred to as total rewards[1] . The term "compensation and benefits" refers to the discipline as well as the rewards themselves.Contents1 The basic components of employee compensation and benefits 2 Guaranteed pay 3 Variable pay 4 Benefits 5 Equity-based compensation 6 Intangible benefits 7 Pay aggregates7.1 External equity 7.2 Internal equity8 Organizational place 9 Main influencers 10 Bonus plans benefits 11 See also 12 ReferencesThe basic components of employee compensation and benefits[edit] Employee compensation and benefits are divided into four basic categories: 1. Guaranteed pay – a fixed monetary (cash) reward paid by an employer to an employee
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