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Arsinoe II
Arsinoë II (Ancient Greek: Ἀρσινόη, 316 BC – unknown date between July 270 and 260 BC) was a Ptolemaic Queen and co-regent of Ancient Egypt. She was Queen of Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia by marriage to King Lysimachus
Lysimachus
(Greek: Λυσίμαχος), and queen and co-ruler of Egypt with her brother-husband Ptolemy II
Ptolemy II
Philadelphus (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Φιλάδελφος, "Ptolemy the sibling-loving")
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Aratus Of Sicyon
Aratus
Aratus
(/əˈreɪtəs/; Greek: Ἄρατος; 271–213 BC) was a statesman of the ancient Greek city-state of Sicyon
Sicyon
and a leader of the Achaean League. He deposed the Sicyonian tyrant Nicocles in 251 BC. Aratus
Aratus
was an advocate of Greek unity and brought Sicyon
Sicyon
into the Achaean League, which he led to its maximum extent. He was elected strategos many times and led the Achaeans against Macedonia, the Aetolians
Aetolians
and the Spartans. After the Spartans defeated and nearly destroyed the cities of the Achaean League, he requested Antigonus III Doson of Macedonia to help fight against the Aetolians
Aetolians
and Spartans. After Antigonus died in 221 BC, Aratus
Aratus
did not get along with the new king, Philip V of Macedon, who wanted to make the Achaean League subject to Macedonia
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Agathocles (son Of Lysimachus)
Agathocles (Greek: Ἀγαθοκλῆς) is a Greek name, the most famous of which is Agathocles of Syracuse, the tyrant of Syracuse. The name is derived from ἀγαθός, agathos, i.e. "good" and κλέος, kleos, i.e
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Running In Ancient Greece
In Ancient Greece, the history of running can be traced back to 776 BC. Running
Running
was important to members of ancient Greek society, and is consistently highlighted in documents referencing the Olympic Games. The Olympic Games
Olympic Games
hosted a large variety of running events, each with their own set of rules. The ancient Greeks
Greeks
developed difficult training programs with specialized trainers in preparation for the Games
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Milan Papyrus
The Milan Papyrus[1] is a papyrus roll inscribed in Alexandria
Alexandria
in the late 3rd or early 2nd century BC during the rule of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Originally discovered by anonymous tomb raiders as part of a mummy wrapping, it was purchased in the papyrus "grey market" in Europe in 1992[2] by the University of Milan. Over six hundred previously unknown lines of Greek poetry
Greek poetry
are on the roll, representing about 112 brief poems, or epigrams. Two of these were already known and had been attributed by the 12th-century AD Byzantine scholar John Tzetzes to the Hellenistic
Hellenistic
epigrammatist Posidippus of Pella (c. 310 – c. 240 BC), a Macedonian who spent his literary career in Alexandria
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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MSNBC
MS NBC
NBC
is an American news cable and satellite television network that provides news coverage and political commentary from NBC News
NBC News
on current events. MS NBC
NBC
is owned by the NBCUniversal
NBCUniversal
News Group, a unit of the NBCUniversal
NBCUniversal
Television Group division of NBCUniversal
NBCUniversal
(all of which are ultimately owned by Comcast). MS NBC
NBC
and its website were founded in 1996 under a partnership between Microsoft
Microsoft
and General Electric's NBC
NBC
unit, hence the network's naming.[3] Although they had the same name, msnbc.com and MS NBC
NBC
maintained separate corporate structures and news operations
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Arsinoitherium
Arsinoitherium
Arsinoitherium
is an extinct genus of paenungulate mammals belonging to the extinct order Embrithopoda. It is related to elephants, sirenians, hyraxesm and the extinct desmostylians. Arsinoitheres were superficially rhinoceros-like herbivores that lived during the late Eocene
Eocene
and the early Oligocene
Oligocene
of northern Africa from 36 to 30 million years ago, in areas of tropical rainforest and at the margin of mangrove swamps. A species described in 2004, A
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Ptolemy II
Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemy
Ptolemy
(/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos [kláwdios ptolɛmɛ́ːos]; Latin: Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemaeus; c. AD 100 – c. 170)[2] was a Greco-Roman[3] mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.[4][5] He lived in the city of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Roman province of Egypt, wrote in Koine Greek, and held Roman citizenship.[6] The 14th-century astronomer Theodore Meliteniotes gave his birthplace as the prominent Greek city Ptolemais Hermiou
Ptolemais Hermiou
(Greek: Πτολεμαΐς ‘Ερμείου) in the Thebaid
Thebaid
(Greek: Θηβαΐδα [Θηβαΐς])
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Posidippus
Posidippus of Pella
Pella
(Ancient Greek: Ποσείδιππος Poseidippos; c. 310 – c. 240 BC) was an Ancient Greek epigrammatic poet.Contents1 Life 2 Poetry 3 Editions 4 Notes 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Posidippus was born in the city of Pella, capital of the kingdom of Macedon. He lived for some time in Samos
Samos
before moving permanently to the court of Ptolemy I Soter
Ptolemy I Soter
and later Ptolemy II Philadelphus
Ptolemy II Philadelphus
in Alexandria, Egypt
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Seleucid Empire
The Seleucid Empire
Empire
(/sɪˈljuːsɪd/;[6] Ancient Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
state ruled by the Seleucid dynasty, which existed from 312 BC to 63 BC; Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
founded it following the division of the Macedonian empire vastly expanded by Alexander the Great.[7][8][9][10] Seleucus received Babylonia
Babylonia
(321 BC), and from there, expanded his dominions to include much of Alexander's near-eastern territories
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Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
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Eurydice Of Egypt
Eurydice (in Greek Ευρυδικη, Evridiki) was a Queen of Egypt by marriage to Ptolemy I Soter.Contents1 Life 2 Issue 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] She was the daughter of Antipater and married Ptolemy I Soter
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Herald And Trumpet Contest
In the 96th Olympiad (396 BC), beside the athletic and artistic competitions,[1] the "Herald and Trumpet contest" was added, which was already a formal element of the Olympic ritual performed by the kerykes (heralds) and salpinktai (trumpeteers) . Winners were chosen by the clarity of the enunciation and the audibility of their voice or horn blast. Some notable victors were:Timaeus (trumpeter) and Crates (herald) of Elis, the first ones. Herodorus of Megara
Herodorus of Megara
(ten times) 328-292 BC trumpeter. Diogenes of Ephesus 69-85 AD (five times) trumpeter. Valerius Eclectus of Sinope 245,253-261 AD (four times) herald.References[edit]^ Gymnikos, hippikos and mousikos agon (naked, equine and artistic contest)Ancient Greek Athletics By Stephen G
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Cassandreia
Cassandreia (Ancient Greek: Κασσάνδρεια - Kassandreia) was once one of the most important cities in Ancient Macedonia, founded by and named after Cassander
Cassander
in 316 BC. It was located on the site of the earlier Ancient Greek city of Potidaea, at the isthmus of the Pallene peninsula.[1] The fact that Cassander
Cassander
named it after himself suggests that he may have intended it to be his capital, and if the canal which cuts the peninsula at this point was dug or at least planned in his time, he may have intended to develop his naval forces using it as a base with two harbours on the east and west sides. Cassandreia soon became a great and powerful city, surpassing the other Macedonian towns in wealth
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