HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Arnold Bennett
Enoch Arnold Bennett
Arnold Bennett
(27 May 1867 – 27 March 1931) was an English writer. He is best known as a novelist, but he also worked in other fields such as the theatre, journalism, propaganda and films.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Journalism
Journalism
and nonfiction 2.2 Move to France 2.3 Public service 2.4 Final years 2.5 References to the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Potteries in his works 2.6 Criticism3 Quotations 4 List of works4.1 Fiction 4.2 Non-fiction 4.3 Plays 4.4 Opera 4.5 Film
Film
adaptations 4.6 Television adaptations5 Commemorations5.1 The Omelette Arnold Bennett 5.2 Newcastle-Under-Lyme, Staffordshire6 Memorials 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Bennett was born in a modest house in Hanley in the Potteries district of Staffordshire
[...More...]

"Arnold Bennett" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
[...More...]

"New York Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stoke-upon-Trent
Stoke-upon-Trent, commonly called Stoke, is a component town of the city of Stoke-on-Trent, in Staffordshire, England. The town was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1874 and is one of six that federated to form the county borough of Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent
in 1910, along with Hanley, Tunstall, Burslem, Longton and Fenton. It is the seat of the city's council, though Stoke-on-Trent's city centre is usually regarded as being the nearby town of Hanley which, since federation, has been the most commercially important of the six towns.Contents1 Name1.1 Renaming proposals2 Growth of Stoke and its transport links 3 King's Hall 4 Stoke Market 5 The Potteries 6 Stoke today 7 References 8 Further readingName[edit] On 1 April 1910, the town was federated into the county borough of Stoke-on-Trent. By 1925 the area was granted city status. Confusion can arise over the similarity of this town's name to that of the larger city
[...More...]

"Stoke-upon-Trent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guy De Maupassant
Henri René Albert Guy de Maupassant
Guy de Maupassant
(/ˈmoʊpəˌsɑːnt/;[2] French: [ɡid(ə) mopasɑ̃]; 5 August 1850 – 6 July 1893) was a French writer, remembered as a master of the short story form, and as a representative of the naturalist school of writers, who depicted human lives and destinies and social forces in disillusioned and often pessimistic terms. Maupassant was a protégé of Flaubert and his stories are characterized by economy of style and efficient, effortless dénouements (outcomes). Many are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s, describing the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught up in events beyond their control, are permanently changed by their experiences. He wrote some 300 short stories, six novels, three travel books, and one volume of verse
[...More...]

"Guy De Maupassant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"First World War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ministry Of Information (United Kingdom)
The Ministry of Information (MOI), headed by the Minister of Information, was a United Kingdom government department created briefly at the end of the First World War and again during the Second World War.[1] Located in Senate House at the University of London during the 1940s, it was the central government department responsible for publicity and propaganda.Contents1 First World War1.1 Ministers of Information 1918–19192 Second World War2.1 Pre-War planning, 1935–38 2.2 The Ministry of Information and the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, 1938–39 2.3 The Phoney War, 1939–40 2.4 The Battle of Britain, 1940 2.5 Later stages of the War, 1941–45 2.6 Post War, 1945–46 2.7 Campaigns 2.8 Working practices 2.9 Ministers of Information 1939–46 2.10 Current research3 See also 4 ReferencesFirst World War[edit] In the Great War, several different agencies had been responsible for propaganda, except for a brief period when there had
[...More...]

"Ministry Of Information (United Kingdom)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lord Beaverbrook
William Maxwell Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook, PC, ONB (25 May 1879 – 9 June 1964) was a Canadian-British newspaper publisher and backstage politician who was an influential figure in British media and politics of the first half of the 20th century. His base of power was the largest circulation newspaper in the world, the Daily Express, which appeal to the conservative working class with intensely patriotic news and editorials. During the Second World War
Second World War
he played a major role in mobilising industrial resources as Winston Churchill's minister of aircraft production.[1] The young Max Aitken had a gift for making money and was a millionaire by 30. His business ambitions quickly exceeded opportunities in Canada and he moved to Britain. There he befriended Bonar Law
Bonar Law
and with his support won a seat in the House of Commons at the general election held in December 1910. A knighthood followed shortly after
[...More...]

"Lord Beaverbrook" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knighthood
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
[...More...]

"Knighthood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Osbert Sitwell
Sir Francis Osbert Sacheverell Sitwell, 5th Baronet
Baronet
(6 December 1892 – 4 May 1969) was an English writer. His elder sister was Edith Sitwell and his younger brother was Sacheverell Sitwell. Like them, he devoted his life to art and literature.Contents1 Early life1.1 Army2 Political and other activity 3 Writing career3.1 Works 3.2 Rat Week 3.3 Autobiography4 Baronetcy 5 Death 6 Gallery of Montegufoni 7 Select bibliography 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit]John Singer Sargent, The Sitwell Family, 1900. From left: Edith Sitwell (1887–1964), Sir George Sitwell, Lady Ida, Sacheverell Sitwell (1897–1988), and Osbert Sitwell
Osbert Sitwell
(1892–1969)Sitwell was born on 6 December 1892 at 3 Arlington Street, London. His parents were Sir George Reresby Sitwell, fourth baronet, genealogist and antiquarian, and Lady Ida Emily Augusta (née Denison)
[...More...]

"Osbert Sitwell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Staffordshire Potteries
The Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Potteries is the industrial area encompassing the six towns, Tunstall, Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Fenton and Longton[1] that now make up the city of Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent
in Staffordshire, England. North Staffordshire
Staffordshire
became a centre of ceramic production in the early 17th century,[2] due to the local availability of clay, salt, lead and coal. Hundreds of companies produced decorative or industrial items.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The boom came after the discovery in 1720 by potter John Astbury
John Astbury
of Shelton, that by adding heated and ground flint powder to the local reddish clay could create a more palatable white or cream ware
[...More...]

"Staffordshire Potteries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Knypersley Hall
Knypersley Hall is an 18th-century Georgian style country mansion at Biddulph, Staffordshire, England. It is protected as a Grade II* Listed building. After falling into a state of disrepair it was partially subdivided into residential apartments, although the Hall was not wholly restored at this point and was falling into further disrepair. However, the current owner has restored, repaired and divided into three separate residential dwellings - Knypersley Hall (the grand hall proper), East View and West View which complement the remainder of the original buildings which were part of the original Hall Estate (The Chapel, Rose Cottage, The Workshop and The Coach House). The Manor of Knypersley was held by the de Knypersley family from ancient times, until Katherine de Knypersley, heiress to the estates, married Thomas Bowyer late in the 14th century
[...More...]

"Knypersley Hall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Montmartre
Montmartre
Montmartre
(French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃.maʁtʁ]) is a large hill in Paris's 18th arrondissement. It is 130 m (430 ft) high and gives its name to the surrounding district, part of the Right Bank in the northern section of the city. The historic district established by the City of Paris
Paris
in 1995 is bordered by rue Caulaincourt and rue Custine on the north, rue de Clignancourt on the east, and boulevard de Clichy and boulevard de Rochechouart to the south,[1] containing 60 ha (150 acres).[2] Montmartre
Montmartre
is primarily known for its artistic history, the white-domed Basilica of the Sacré-Cœur on its summit, and as a nightclub district
[...More...]

"Montmartre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leek, Staffordshire
Leek (/liːk/) is a market town and civil parish in the county of Staffordshire, England, on the River Churnet. It is situated about 10 miles (16 km) north east of Stoke-on-Trent. It is an ancient borough and was granted its royal charter in 1214. It is the administrative centre for the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Moorlands District Council. King John granted Ranulph de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester, the right to hold a weekly Wednesday market and an annual seven-day fair in Leek in 1207. Leek's coat of arms is made up of a Saltire
Saltire
Shield. On the top is the Stafford
Stafford
Knot, either side is the Leek "Double Sunset" and below a gold garb. The crest is a mural crown with three Mulberry leaves on a Mount of Heather on top of which a Moorcock is resting his claw on a small-weave Shuttle
[...More...]

"Leek, Staffordshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alec Guinness
World War IIOperation Husky Sir
Sir
Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (born Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
de Cuffe; 2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an English actor. After an early career on the stage, Guinness was featured in several of the Ealing Comedies, including The Ladykillers
The Ladykillers
and Kind Hearts and Coronets
Kind Hearts and Coronets
in which he played nine different characters. He is also known for his six collaborations with David Lean: Herbert Pocket
Herbert Pocket
in Great Expectations (1946), Fagin
Fagin
in Oliver Twist (1948), Col. Nicholson in The Bridge on the River Kwai
The Bridge on the River Kwai
(1957, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor), Prince Faisal in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), General Yevgraf Zhivago in Doctor Zhivago (1965), and Professor Godbole in A Passage to India (1984)
[...More...]

"Alec Guinness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
(/wʊlf/;[3] née Stephen; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer who is considered one of the most important modernist twentieth century authors and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device. She was born in an affluent household in South Kensington, London, attended the Ladies' Department of King's College and was acquainted with the early reformers of women's higher education. Having been home-schooled for the most part of her childhood, mostly in English classics and Victorian literature, Woolf began writing professionally in 1900. During the interwar period, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
was an important part of London's literary society as well as a central figure in the group of intellectuals known as the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
Group
[...More...]

"Virginia Woolf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Max Beerbohm
Sir Henry Maximilian "Max" Beerbohm (24 August 1872 – 20 May 1956) was an English essayist, parodist, and caricaturist under the signature Max. He first became known in the 1890s as a dandy and a humorist. He was the drama critic for the Saturday Review from 1898 until 1910, when he relocated to Rapallo, Italy. In his later years he was popular for his occasional radio broadcasts. Among his best-known works is his only novel, Zuleika Dobson, published in 1911
[...More...]

"Max Beerbohm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.