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Armand Phillip Bartos
Armand Phillip Bartos (1910 – December 29, 2005) was an American architect and philanthropist. Though highly active as a philanthropist, Bartos became primarily known as the co-designer of Shrine of the Book
Shrine of the Book
that houses the Dead Sea Scrolls in western Jerusalem
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-ou
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Art Institute Of Chicago
The Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1879 and located in Chicago's Grant Park, is one of the oldest and largest art museums in the United States. Recognized for its curatorial efforts and popularity among visitors, the museum hosts approximately 1.5 million guests annually.[2] Its collection, stewarded by 11 curatorial departments, is encyclopedic, and includes iconic works such as Georges Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, Pablo Picasso's The Old Guitarist, Edward Hopper's Nighthawks, and Grant Wood's American Gothic
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Rembrandt
Rembrandt
Rembrandt
Harmenszoon van Rijn (/ˈrɛmbrænt, -brɑːnt/;[2] Dutch: [ˈrɛmbrɑnt ˈɦɑrmə(n)soːn vɑn ˈrɛin] ( listen); 15 July 1606[1] – 4 October 1669) was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker. An innovative and prolific master in three media,[3] he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history.[4] Unlike most Dutch masters of the 17th century, Rembrandt's works depict a wide range of style and subject matter, from portraits and self-portraits to landscapes, genre scenes, allegorical and historical scenes, biblical and mythological themes as well as animal studies
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Yeshiva University
Coordinates: 40°51′01″N 73°55′47″W / 40.85028°N 73.92972°W / 40.85028; -73.92972 Yeshiva
Yeshiva
UniversityMotto תורה ומדע (Hebrew)Motto in English Torah
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State University Of New York At Buffalo
The State University of New York
State University of New York
at Buffalo is a public research university with campuses in Buffalo and Amherst, New York, United States. It is commonly referred to as the University at Buffalo
University at Buffalo
(UB) or SUNY
SUNY
Buffalo, and was formerly known as the University of Buffalo. The university was founded in 1846 as a private medical college, but in 1962 merged with the State University of New York
State University of New York
(SUNY) system. By enrollment, UB is the largest in the SUNY
SUNY
system,[5] and also the largest public university in New York. UB also has the largest endowment and research funding, as a comprehensive university center in the SUNY
SUNY
system.[6][7] As of 2017[update], the university enrolls 30,648 students[3] in 13 colleges
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United States Dollar
The United States
United States
dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States
United States
and its territories per the United States
United States
Constitution since 1792. In practice, the dollar is divided into 100 smaller cent (¢) units, but is occasionally divided into 1000 mills (₥) for accounting. The circulating paper money consists of Federal Reserve
Federal Reserve
Notes that are denominated in United States dollars (12 U.S.C. § 418). Since the suspension in 1971[4] of convertibility of paper U.S. currency into any precious metal, the U.S. dollar is, de facto, fiat money.[5] As it is the most used in international transactions, the U.S
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US
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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New York Public Library
Coordinates: 40°45′10″N 73°58′54″W / 40.75270°N 73.98180°W / 40.75270; -73.98180New York Public LibraryThe New York Public Library Main Branch
New York Public Library Main Branch
in Bryant Park, ManhattanEstablished 1895Location New York CityBranches 92[1]CollectionSize 53,000,000 books and other items[2]Access and usePopulation served 3,500,000 (Manhattan, The Bronx
The Bronx
and Staten Island)Other informationBudget $245,000,000[2]Director Anthony Marx, President and CEO William P. Kelly, Andrew W. Mellon Director of the Research Libraries[3]Staff 3,150Website www.nypl.orgThe New York Public Library
New York Public Library
(NYPL) is a public library system in New York City
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The Museum Of Modern Art
The Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
(MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City, on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. MoMA has be
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Daniel Burnham
Daniel Hudson Burnham, FAIA (September 4, 1846 – June 1, 1912) was an American architect and urban designer
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Vienna
Vienna
Vienna
(/viˈɛnə/ (listen);[11][12] German: Wien [viːn] (listen)) is the federal capital, largest city and one of nine states of Austria. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million[3] (2.6 million within the metropolitan area,[6] nearly one third of the country's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
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Montezuma, New Mexico
Montezuma is an unincorporated community in San Miguel County, New Mexico, United States. It is located about five miles northwest of the city of Las Vegas, New Mexico. The town was best known for many years for its natural hot springs,[1] and was in fact called "Los Ojos Calientes".[2] or "Las Vegas Hot Springs" until the late 19th century. The town consists of ranches, a post office, and the United World College-USA. History[edit] Prehistorically, Native Americans valued the hot springs and regarded them therapeutically.[3] According to The Montezuma (New Mexico) Story, the site was initially commercialized in 1840, when a man named McDonald petitioned the Mexican government for the land, and was granted it on the condition he became a Mexican citizen. He then set up a house by the hot springs and charged for admission to the springs.[2] In 1846, after the territory of New Mexico
New Mexico
was conquered by the U.S
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Margalit Fox
Margalit Fox (born 1961) is an American writer for The New York Times, and other publications, and is a book author. She has written more than 1,200 obituaries for the Times. After beginning her career in publishing in the 1980s, Fox switched to journalism in the 1990s, and finally became an obituary writer in 2004. She also writes non-fiction books.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography2.1 Notable obituaries3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Fox was born in Glen Cove, New York, the daughter of David (a physicist) and Laura Fox.[1] She attended Barnard College
Barnard College
in New York City and then Stony Brook University, where she completed her bachelor's degree (1982) and then a master's degree in linguistics in 1983
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The Jerusalem Post
The Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Post is a broadsheet newspaper based in Jerusalem, founded in 1932 during the British Mandate of Palestine
British Mandate of Palestine
by Gershon Agron as The Palestine Post. In 1950, it changed its name to The Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Post. In 2004, the paper was bought by Mirkaei Tikshoret, a diversified Israeli media firm controlled by investor Eli Azur. In April 2014, Azur acquired the newspaper Maariv.[4] The newspaper is published in English and French editions. Formerly regarded as left-wing, the paper underwent a noticeable shift to the right in the late 1980s.[5] From 2004, under then editor-in-chief David Horovitz, the paper took a more centrist position, competing against the staunchly left-liberal Ha'aretz
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