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Arkalochori
Arkalochori
Arkalochori
(Greek: Αρκαλοχώρι) is a town and a former municipality in the Heraklion
Heraklion
regional unit, Crete, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Minoa Pediada, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 237.589 km2 (91.734 sq mi).[3] The town lies on the western edge of the Minoa Pediada
Minoa Pediada
plain, west of the Lasithi
Lasithi
plateau, in central Crete. It contains the archaeological site of a Minoan sacred cave
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Prophet Elias
Elijah
Elijah
(/ɪˈlaɪdʒə/; ih-LY-jə; Hebrew: אֱלִיָּהוּ‬, Eliyahu, meaning "My God
God
is Yahu/Jah"[1][2]) or Elias
Elias
(/ɪˈlaɪəs/ ih-LY-əs; Greek: Ἡλίας Elías; Syriac: ܐܸܠܝܼܵܐ‎ Elyāe; Arabic: إلياس or إليا, Ilyās or Ilyā) was a prophet and a miracle worker who lived in the northern kingdom of Israel[3] during the reign of King Ahab
King Ahab
(9th century BC), according to the Books of Kings in the Hebrew Bible. In 1 Kings 18, Elijah
Elijah
defended the worship of the Jewish God
God
over that of the Canaanite deity Baal
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Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Ephor
This article is part of the series: Spartan ConstitutionGreat Rhetra Laws of Lycurgus PoliteiaList of Kings of Sparta Gerousia Ephorate Apella Spartiates Perioeci Helots Agoge SyssitiaSpartan army •   Other Greek city-states •  Law Portalview talk editThe ephors were leaders of ancient Sparta
Sparta
and shared power with the two Spartan kings. The ephors were a council of five elected annually who swore "on behalf of the city", while the kings swore for themselves.[1] Herodotus
Herodotus
claimed that the institution was created by Lycurgus, while Plutarch
Plutarch
considers it a later institution. It may have arisen from the need for governors while the kings were leading armies in battle. The ephors were elected by the popular assembly, and all citizens were eligible for election. They were forbidden to be reelected
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Votive Offering
A votive deposit or votive offering is one or more objects displayed or deposited, without the intention of recovery or use, in a sacred place for broadly religious purposes. Such items are a feature of modern and ancient societies and are generally made in order to gain favor with supernatural forces. Some offerings have apparently been made in anticipation of the achievement of a particular wish, but in Western cultures from which documentary evidence survives it has been more typical to wait until the wish has been fulfilled before making the offering,[citation needed] for which the more specific term ex-voto may be used. In Buddhism, votive offering such as construction of stupas was a prevalent and holy practice in Ancient India, an example of which can be observed in the ruins of the ancient Vikramshila University[2] and other contemporary structures
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Simulacra
A simulacrum (plural: simulacra from Latin: simulacrum, which means "likeness, similarity") is a representation or imitation of a person or thing.[1] The word was first recorded in the English language in the late 16th century, used to describe a representation, such as a statue or a painting, especially of a god. By the late 19th century, it had gathered a secondary association of inferiority: an image without the substance or qualities of the original.[2] Philosopher Fredric Jameson offers photorealism as an example of artistic simulacrum, where a painting is sometimes created by copying a photograph that is itself a copy of the real.[3] Other art forms that play with simulacra include trompe-l'œil,[4] pop art, Italian neorealism, and French New Wave.[3]Contents1 Philosophy 2 Literature, film, television, and music2.1 Artificial beings 2.2 Simulated environments2.2.1 Film 2.2.2 TV series 2.2.3 Music2.3 Philip K
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Ingots
An ingot is a piece of relatively pure material, usually metal, that is cast into a shape suitable for further processing.[1] In steelmaking, it is the first step among semi-finished casting products. Ingots usually require a second procedure of shaping, such as cold/hot working, cutting, or milling to produce a useful final product
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Pottery Sherds
In archaeology, a sherd, or more precisely, potsherd,[1] is commonly a historic or prehistoric fragment of pottery, although the term is occasionally used to refer to fragments of stone and glass vessels, as well.[citation needed] Occasionally, a piece of broken pottery may be referred to as a shard. While the spelling shard is generally reserved for referring to fragments of glass vessels, the term does not exclude pottery fragments. The etymology is connected with the idea of breakage, from Old English sceard, related to Old Norse skarth, "notch", and Middle High German scharte, "notch".[citation needed] A sherd or potsherd that has been used by having writing painted or inscribed on it can be more precisely referred to as an ostracon. The analysis of sherds is widely used by archaeologists to date sites and develop chronologies, due to their diagnostic characteristics and high resistance to natural, destructive processes
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Louis Godart
Louis Godart (born 12 August 1945) is an Italian archaeologist of Belgian origins. He is a specialist in Mycenaean archaeology and philology and holds the chair of philology at the University of Naples Federico II. He is also currently Director for the Conservation of Artistic Heritage of the Italian President. Studies[edit] Godart was born in Bourseigne-Vieille. After attending middle and high school at the Collège de Bellevue in Dinant in Belgium until 1963, he graduated in classical philology in 1967 at the University of Louvain. In 1971 he got a PhD in literature and philosophy at the Free University of Brussels and, in 1977, another doctorate in arts and humanities at the Sorbonne in Paris. Godart researched on the Mycenaean Linear B tablets and, in general, on the Aegean writing
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Galatas Palace
The Galatas Palace is a Minoan site on Crete found in the early 1990s. The East Wing is the best preserved part of the building, while the West and South wings have been extensively damaged. Excavations have continued the North wing of the building, which is proving to be more promising. The archaeological site is considered by its excavator to be a Minoan palace
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British School At Athens
The British School at Athens
Athens
(BSA) (Greek: Βρετανική Σχολή Αθηνών) is one of the 17 Foreign Archaeological Institutes in Athens, Greece.Contents1 General information 2 Facilities 3 Archaeological fieldwork 4 History of the BSA 5 Directors of the BSA 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further reading 10 External linksGeneral information[edit] The School was founded in 1886 as the fourth such institution in Greece. For most of its existence, it focused on supporting, directing and facilitating British-based research in Classical Studies
Classical Studies
and Archaeology, but in recent years, it has broadened that focus to all areas of Greek Studies
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American Journal Of Archaeology
The American Journal of Archaeology
Archaeology
(AJA), the peer-reviewed journal of the Archaeological Institute of America, has been published since 1897 (continuing the American Journal of Archaeology
Archaeology
and of the History of the Fine Arts founded by the institute in 1885).[1][2] The publication was co-founded in 1885 by Princeton University
Princeton University
professors Arthur Frothingham and Allan Marquand.[2] Frothingham became the first editor, serving until 1896.[2] The journal primarily features articles about the art and archaeology of Europe
Europe
and the Mediterranean world, including the Near East
Near East
and Egypt, from prehistoric to Late Antique
Late Antique
times.[1] It also publishes book reviews, museum exhibition reviews, and necrologies
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Cyclades
The Cyclades
Cyclades
(/ˈsɪklədiːz/; Greek: Κυκλάδες [cikˈlaðes]) are an island group in the Aegean Sea, southeast of mainland Greece and a former administrative prefecture of Greece. They are one of the island groups which constitute the Aegean archipelago. The name refers to the islands around (κυκλάς) the sacred island of Delos
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N. K. Sandars
Nancy Katharine Sandars, FSA, FBA (29 June 1914 – 20 November 2015) was a British archaeologist and prehistorian
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