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Argonautica
The Argonautica
Argonautica
(Greek: Ἀργοναυτικά, translit. Argonautika) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica
Argonautica
tells the myth of the voyage of Jason
Jason
and the Argonauts
Argonauts
to retrieve the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
from remote Colchis. Their heroic adventures and Jason's relationship with the dangerous Colchian princess/sorceress Medea
Medea
were already well known to Hellenistic audiences, which enabled Apollonius to go beyond a simple narrative, giving it a scholarly emphasis suitable to the times. It was the age of the great Library of Alexandria, and his epic incorporates his researches in geography, ethnography, comparative religion, and Homeric literature
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Labyrinth
In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth
Labyrinth
(Greek: Λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate, confusing structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus
Daedalus
for King Minos
Minos
of Crete
Crete
at Knossos. Its function was to hold the Minotaur, the monster eventually killed by the hero Theseus
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Aeneid
The Aeneid
Aeneid
(/ɪˈniːɪd/; Latin: Aeneis [ae̯ˈneːɪs]) is a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil
Virgil
between 29 and 19 BC,[1] that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans. It comprises 9,896 lines in dactylic hexameter.[2] The first six of the poem's twelve books tell the story of Aeneas's wanderings from Troy
Troy
to Italy, and the poem's second half tells of the Trojans' ultimately victorious war upon the Latins, under whose name Aeneas
Aeneas
and his Trojan followers are destined to be subsumed. The hero Aeneas
Aeneas
was already known to Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
legend and myth, having been a character in the Iliad
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Daedalus
In Greek mythology, Daedalus
Daedalus
(/ˈdɛdələs ˈdiːdələs/; Ancient Greek: Δαίδαλος Daidalos "cunningly wrought", perhaps related to δαιδάλλω "to work artfully";[1] Latin: Daedalus; Etruscan: Taitale) was a skillful craftsman and artist.[2][3] He is the father of Icarus, the uncle of Perdix, and possibly also the father of Iapyx, although this is unclear.Contents1 Family 2 Daedalus' Statues 3 The Labyrinth 4 Daedalus
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Chimera (mythology)
The Chimera (/kɪˈmɪərə/ or /kaɪˈmɪərə/, also Chimaera (Chimæra); Greek: Χίμαιρα, Chímaira "she-goat") was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia
Lycia
in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal
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Pegasus
Pegasus
Pegasus
(Greek: Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Latin: Pegasus, Pegasos) is a mythical winged divine stallion, and one of the most recognised creatures in Greek mythology. Usually depicted as pure white, Pegasus is a child of the Olympian god Poseidon, in his role as horse-god. He was foaled by the Gorgon
Gorgon
Medusa[1] upon her death, when the hero Perseus
Perseus
decapitated her. Pegasus
Pegasus
is the brother of Chrysaor
Chrysaor
and the uncle of Geryon. Greco-Roman poets wrote about the ascent of Pegasus
Pegasus
to heaven after his birth, and his subsequent obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods, who instructed him to bring lightning and thunder from Olympus
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Bellerophon
Bellerophon
Bellerophon
(/bəˈlɛrəfən/; Greek: Βελλεροφῶν) or Bellerophontes (Βελλεροφόντης) is a hero of Greek mythology
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Minotaur
In Greek mythology, the Minotaur
Minotaur
(/ˈmaɪnətɔːr/,[1] /ˈmɪnəˌtɔːr/;[2] Ancient Greek: Μῑνώταυρος [miːnɔ̌ːtau̯ros], Latin: Minotaurus, Etruscan: Θevrumineś) is a mythical creature portrayed in Classical times with the head of a bull and the body of a man[3] or, as described by Roman poet Ovid, a being "part man and part bull".[4] The Minotaur
Minotaur
dwelt at the center of the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction[5] designed by the architect Daedalus
Daedalus
and his son Icarus, on the command of King Minos
Minos
of Crete. The Minotaur
Minotaur
was eventually killed by the Athenian hero Theseus. The term Minotaur
Minotaur
derives from the Ancient Greek Μῑνώταυρος, a compound of the name Μίνως (Minos) and the noun ταύρος "bull", translated as "(the) Bull of Minos"
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Hippomenes
In Greek mythology, Hippomenes
Hippomenes
/hɪˈpɒmɪniːz/ (Ancient Greek: Ἱππομένης), also known as Melanion /məˈlæniən/ (Μελανίων or Μειλανίων),[1] was a son of the Arcadian Amphidamas[2] or of Megareus of Onchestus[3] and the husband of Atalanta. He was known to have been one of the disciples of Chiron, and to have surpassed other disciples in his eagerness to undertake hard challenges.[4] Inscriptions mention him as one of the Calydonian hunters.[5] Mythology[edit] The main myth of Hippomenes' courtship of Atalanta, narrated by Pseudo-Apollodorus,[2] Ovid,[6] Servius,[7] and Hyginus[8] was as follows. Hippomenes
Hippomenes
fell in love with Atalanta, the virgin huntress who strongly disliked the idea of getting married
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Golden Apple
The golden apple is an element that appears in various national and ethnic folk legends or fairy tales. Recurring themes depict a hero (for example Hercules
Hercules
or Făt-Frumos) retrieving the golden apples hidden or stolen by a monstrous antagonist
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Cadmus
In Greek mythology, Cadmus
Cadmus
(/ˈkædməs/; Greek: Κάδμος Kadmos), was the founder and first king of Thebes.[1] Cadmus
Cadmus
was the first
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Sphinx
A sphinx (Ancient Greek: Σφίγξ [spʰíŋks], Boeotian: Φίξ [pʰíːks], plural sphinxes or sphinges) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion. In Greek tradition, it has the head of a human, the haunches of a lion, and sometimes the wings of a bird. It is mythicised as treacherous and merciless. Those who cannot answer its riddle suffer a fate typical in such mythological stories, as they are killed and eaten by this ravenous monster.[1] This deadly version of a sphinx appears in the myth and drama of Oedipus.[2] Unlike the Greek sphinx, which was a woman, the Egyptian sphinx is typically shown as a man (an androsphinx). In addition, the Egyptian sphinx was viewed as benevolent, but having a ferocious strength similar to the malevolent Greek version and both were thought of as guardians often flanking the entrances to temples.[3] In European decorative art, the sphinx enjoyed a major revival during the Renaissance
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Oedipus
Oedipus
Oedipus
(US: /ˈiːdəpəs, ˈɛdə-/, UK: /ˈiːdəpəs/; Greek: Οἰδίπους Oidípous meaning "swollen foot") was a mythical Greek king of Thebes. A tragic hero in Greek mythology, Oedipus accidentally fulfilled a prophecy that he would end up killing his father and marrying his mother, thereby bringing disaster to his city and family. The story of Oedipus
Oedipus
is the subject of Sophocles' tragedy Oedipus
Oedipus
Rex, which was followed by Oedipus at Colonus
Oedipus at Colonus
and then Antigone. Together, these plays make up Sophocles' three Theban plays
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Gorgon
In Greek mythology, a Gorgon
Gorgon
(/ˈɡɔːrɡən/; plural: Gorgons, Ancient Greek: Γοργών/Γοργώ Gorgon/Gorgo) is a female creature. The name derives from the ancient Greek word gorgós, which means "dreadful", and appears to come from the same root as the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word "garğ" (Sanskrit: गर्जन, garjana) which is defined as a guttural sound, similar to the growling of a beast,[1] thus possibly originating as an onomatopoeia
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Thebes (Greece)
Thebes (/θiːbz/; Ancient Greek: Θῆβαι, Thēbai, Greek pronunciation: [tʰɛ̂ːbai̯];[2] Greek: Θήβα, Thíva [ˈθiva]) is a city in Boeotia, central Greece. It played an important role in Greek myths, as the site of the stories of Cadmus, Oedipus, Dionysus
Dionysus
and others. Archaeological excavations in and around Thebes have revealed a Mycenaean settlement and clay tablets written in the Linear B
Linear B
script, indicating the importance of the site in the Bronze Age. Thebes was the largest city of the ancient region of Boeotia
Boeotia
and was the leader of the Boeotian confederacy. It was a major rival of ancient Athens, and sided with the Persians during the 480 BC invasion under Xerxes. Theban forces under the command of Epaminondas ended the power of Sparta
Sparta
at the Battle of Leuctra
Battle of Leuctra
in 371 BC
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Aeneas
In Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
mythology, Aeneas
Aeneas
(/ɪˈniːəs/;[1] Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías, possibly derived from Greek αἰνή meaning "praised") was a Trojan hero, the son of the prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(Venus). His father was a first cousin of King Priam
Priam
of Troy
Troy
(both being grandsons of Ilus, founder of Troy), making Aeneas
Aeneas
a second cousin to Priam's children (such as Hector
Hector
and Paris). He is a character in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and is mentioned in Homer's Iliad. Aeneas
Aeneas
receives full treatment in Roman mythology, most extensively in Virgil's Aeneid, where he is an ancestor of Romulus
Romulus
and Remus. He became the first true hero of Rome
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