HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Arctic Shrew
The Arctic shrew
Arctic shrew
( Sorex
Sorex
arcticus), also known as the blackback shrew or saddlebacked shrew, is a medium-sized shrew found in Canada
Canada
and the northern United States. Separate species status has been proposed for the maritime shrew ( Sorex
Sorex
maritimensis) which is found in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
and had been considered to be a subspecies of the Arctic shrew. The tundra shrew ( Sorex
Sorex
tundrensis) was formerly considered to be a subspecies of the Arctic shrew.Contents1 Physical description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Mating and reproduction 4 Behaviour 5 Subspecies 6 ReferencesPhysical description[edit] The Arctic shrew
Arctic shrew
is most distinctive in its tricolored fur
[...More...]

"Arctic Shrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
[...More...]

"Conservation Status" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conifer
Cordaitales
Cordaitales
† Pinales   Pinaceae   Araucariaceae   Podocarpaceae   Sciadopityaceae   Cupressaceae   Cephalotaxaceae   Taxaceae Vojnovskyales † Voltziales †SynonymsConiferophyta ConiferaeThe Pinophyta, also known as Coniferophyta or Coniferae, or commonly as conifers, are a division of vascular land plants containing a single extant class, Pinopsida. They are gymnosperms, cone-bearing seed plants. All extant conifers are perennial woody plants with secondary growth. The great majority are trees, though a few are shrubs
[...More...]

"Conifer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mackenzie Valley
The Mackenzie River (Slavey language: Deh-Cho IPA: [tèh tʃʰò], big river or Inuvialuktun: Kuukpak IPA: [kuːkpɑk], great river; French: fleuve (de) Mackenzie) is the longest river system in Canada, and has the second largest drainage basin in North America after the Mississippi River. The Mackenzie River flows through a vast, thinly populated region of forest and tundra entirely within the Canadian Northwest Territories, although its many tributaries reach into four other Canadian provinces and territories. The river's main stem is 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi) long, flowing north-northwest from Great Slave Lake into the Arctic Ocean, where it forms a large delta at its mouth
[...More...]

"Mackenzie Valley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lake
A lake is an area filled with water, localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land, apart from any river or other outlet that serves to feed or drain the lake.[1] Lakes lie on land and are not part of the ocean, and therefore are distinct from lagoons, and are also larger and deeper than ponds, though there are no official or scientific definitions.[2] Lakes can be contrasted with rivers or streams, which are usually flowing. Most lakes are fed and drained by rivers and streams. Natural lakes are generally found in mountainous areas, rift zones, and areas with ongoing glaciation. Other lakes are found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers. In some parts of the world there are many lakes because of chaotic drainage patterns left over from the last Ice Age
[...More...]

"Lake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marsh
A marsh is a wetland that is dominated by herbaceous rather than woody plant species.[1] Marshes can often be found at the edges of lakes and streams, where they form a transition between the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. They are often dominated by grasses, rushes or reeds.[2] If woody plants are present they tend to be low-growing shrubs
[...More...]

"Marsh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wetland
A wetland is a land area that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem.[2] The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants,[3][4] adapted to the unique hydric soil. Wetlands play a number of roles in the environment, principally water purification, flood control, carbon sink and shoreline stability. Wetlands are also considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, serving as home to a wide range of plant and animal life. Wetlands occur naturally on every continent except Antarctica,[5] the largest includes the Amazon River
[...More...]

"Wetland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bog
A bog is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss.[1] It is one of the four main types of wetlands. Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire, and muskeg; alkaline mires are called fens. They are frequently covered in ericaceous shrubs rooted in the sphagnum moss and peat. The gradual accumulation of decayed plant material in a bog functions as a carbon sink.[2] Bogs occur where the water at the ground surface is acidic and low in nutrients. In some cases, the water is derived entirely from precipitation, in which case they are termed ombrotrophic (rain-fed). Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown colour, which comes from dissolved peat tannins. In general, the low fertility and cool climate results in relatively slow plant growth, but decay is even slower owing to the saturated soil. Hence peat accumulates
[...More...]

"Bog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swamp
A swamp is a wetland that is forested.[1] Many swamps occur along large rivers where they are critically dependent upon natural water level fluctuations.[2] Other swamps occur on the shores of large lakes.[3] Some swamps have hammocks, or dry-land protrusions, covered by aquatic vegetation, or vegetation that tolerates periodic inundation.[4] The two main types of swamp are "true" or swamp forests and "transitional" or shrub swamps. In the boreal regions of Canada, the word swamp is colloquially used for what is more correctly termed a bog or muskeg. The water of a swamp may be fresh water, brackish water or seawater
[...More...]

"Swamp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spruce
About 35; see text.A spruce is a tree of the genus Picea
Picea
/paɪˈsiːə/,[1] a genus of about 35 species of coniferous evergreen trees in the family Pinaceae, found in the northern temperate and boreal (taiga) regions of the Earth. Spruces are large trees, from about 20–60 m (about 60–200 ft) tall when mature, and can be distinguished by their whorled branches and conical form. The needles, or leaves, of spruces are attached singly to the branches in a spiral fashion, each needle on a small, peg-like structure. The needles are shed when 4–10 years old, leaving the branches rough with the retained pegs (an easy means of distinguishing them from other similar genera, where the branches are fairly smooth). Spruces are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera (moth and butterfly) species, such as the eastern spruce budworm
[...More...]

"Spruce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tamarack Larch
Larix laricina, commonly known as the tamarack,[3] hackmatack,[3] eastern larch,[3] black larch,[3] red larch,[3] or American larch, is a species of larch native to Canada, from eastern Yukon and Inuvik, Northwest Territories east to Newfoundland, and also south into the upper northeastern United States from Minnesota to Cranesville Swamp, Maryland; there is also an isolated population in central Alaska.[4] The word tamarack is the Algonquian name for the species and means "wood used for snowshoes".Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and ecology 3 Associated forest cover 4 Seed cones and pollen cones 5 Uses 6 Reaction to competition 7 Damaging agents 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDescription[edit] Larix laricina is a small to medium-size boreal coniferous and deciduous tree reaching 10–20 m (33–66 ft) tall, with a trunk up to 60 cm (24 in) diameter. Tamaracks and Larches (Larix species) are deciduous conifers
[...More...]

"Tamarack Larch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Boreal Forests
Taiga
Taiga
(/ˈtaɪɡə/; Russian: тайга́, IPA: [tɐjˈɡa]; from Turkic[1]), also known as boreal forest or snow forest, is a biome characterized by coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces and larches. The taiga is the world's largest biome apart from the oceans
[...More...]

"Boreal Forests" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Forbs
A forb (sometimes spelled phorb) is an herbaceous flowering plant that is not a graminoid (grasses, sedges and rushes). The term is used in biology and in vegetation ecology, especially in relation to grasslands[1] and understory.Contents1 Etymology 2 Forbs and guilds 3 Forbs in informal classification 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] "Forb" is derived from the Greek φορβή (phorbḗ), "pasture" or "fodder".[2][3] The spelling "phorb" is sometimes used, and in older usage this sometimes includes graminids and other plants currently not regarded as forbs. Forbs and guilds[edit] Forbs are members of a guild – a group of plant species with broadly similar growth form
[...More...]

"Forbs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Atlantic Maritime Ecozone
The Atlantic Maritime Ecozone, as defined by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), is an ecozone which covers the Canadian provinces of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, as well as the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. It is adjacent to the Atlantic Marine Ecozone to the east, and the Mixedwood Plains to the west
[...More...]

"Atlantic Maritime Ecozone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cattail
Typha
Typha
/ˈtaɪfə/ is a genus of about 30 species of monocotyledonous flowering plants in the family Typhaceae. These plants have many common names, in British English
British English
as bulrush, or reedmace,[2] in American English
American English
as cattail,[3] punks, or corn dog grass, in Australia as cumbungi or bulrush, in Canada
Canada
as bulrush or cattail, and in New Zealand as raupō. Other taxa of plants may be known as bulrush, including some sedges in Scirpus
Scirpus
and related genera. The genus is largely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere, where it is found in a variety of wetland habitats. The rhizomes are edible
[...More...]

"Cattail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Willow
About 400.[2] See List of Salix speciesWillows, also called sallows, and osiers, form the genus Salix, around 400 species[2] of deciduous trees and shrubs, found primarily on moist soils in cold and temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Most species are known as willow, but some narrow-leaved shrub species are called osier, and some broader-leaved species are referred to as sallow (from Old English
Old English
sealh, related to the Latin
Latin
word salix, willow)
[...More...]

"Willow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.