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Architects (Registration) Acts, 1931 To 1938
The Architects (Registration) Acts, 1931 to 1938
Architects (Registration) Acts, 1931 to 1938
is the statutory citation for three Acts of the United Kingdom Parliament, namely:The Architects (Registration) Act, 1931;[1] The Architects (Registration) Act, 1934; and The Architects Registration Act, 1938.[2]These Acts have been amended and have been replaced as amended by the Architects Act 1997,[3] with effect from 21 July 1997.Contents1 From ARCUK in 1931 to ARB in 19971.1 Extent and citation of the Acts 1.
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Prosecutors
The prosecutor is the chief legal representative of the prosecution in countries with either the common law adversarial system, or the civil law inquisitorial system. The prosecution is the legal party responsible for presenting the case in a criminal trial against an individual accused of breaking the law
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European Professional Qualification Directives
There are two main European legal instruments covering the mutual recognition of professional qualifications: Directive 89/48/EEC and Directive 92/51/EEC. Directive 89/48/EEC covers the mutual recognition of qualifications in recognised professions that require a University degree or equivalent. This directive is implemented in the UK by The European Communities (Recognition of Professional Qualifications) (First General System) Regulations 2005 and by similar regulations in other member states. Directive 92/51/EEC covers the mutual recognition of qualifications in professions regulated below degree level
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Harry Bulkeley Creswell
Harry Bulkeley Creswell FRIBA (1869–1960), was a British architect and author.[1]Biography[edit] Born on 18 May 1869, Harry Creswell was educated at Bedford School and at Trinity College, Dublin. He was articled to Sir Aston Webb RA in 1890, before establishing his own architectural practice in 1899. He was an Inspecting Engineer for the Crown Agents to the Colonies and designed the turbine factory in Queensferry, Flintshire, built between 1901 and 1906 and described by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner as a rare English precursor of Functionalism,[2] Brookwood American Cemetery and Memorial (in association with Egerton Swartwout), and the New Parthenon Room at the British Museum.[3] Creswell was the author of a number of novels, including Thomas (1918), Thomas Settles Down (1919), The Honeywood File (1929) The Honeywood Settlement (1930), Jago versus Swillerton and Toomer (1931), Diary from a Dustbin (1935), Grig (1942), and Grig in Retirement (1943)
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Magistrates' Court (England And Wales)
In England and Wales, a magistrates' court is a lower court which holds trials for summary offences and preliminary hearings for more serious ones. Some civil matters are also decided here, notably family proceedings. In 2015 there were roughly 330 magistrates' courts in England and Wales,[1] though the Government was considering closing up to 57 of these.[2] The jurisdiction of magistrates' courts and rules governing them are set out in the Magistrates' Courts Act 1980. Almost all criminal proceedings start at a magistrates' court. Summary offences are smaller crimes that can be punished under the magistrates' court's limited sentencing powers – community sentences, fines, short custodial sentences. Indictable offences, on the other hand, are serious crimes (rape, murder); if an initial hearing at the magistrates' court finds there is a case to answer, they are committed to the Crown Court, which has a much wider range of sentencing power
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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European Economic Area
EU member states  EEA member  Provisional EEA member (Croatia) EFTA
EFTA
member states  EEA member   EFTA
EFTA

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European Economic Community
The European Economic Community
European Economic Community
(EEC) was a regional organisation which aimed to bring about economic integration among its member states. It was created by the Treaty of Rome
Treaty of Rome
of 1957.[1] Upon the formation of the European Union
European Union
(EU) in 1993, the EEC was incorporated and renamed as the European Community (EC). In 2009 the EC's institutions were absorbed into the EU's wider framework and the community ceased to exist. The Community's initial aim was to bring about economic integration, including a common market and customs union, among its six founding members: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands
Netherlands
and West Germany
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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Directive (European Union)
Council of the EU PresidencyConfigurationsGeneral Foreign Justice and Home EconomicEuroLegislative procedure Voting SecretariatSecretary-GeneralUwe CorsepiusDirectorates-general COREPERJudiciaryCourt of JusticeMembers RulingsGeneral CourtCentral BankPresident DraghiESCB Euro EMU EurozoneCourt of AuditorsBudget OLAFOther bodiesAgencies Investment Bank CoR EESC Ombudsman National parliamentsPolicies and issuesForeign relationsHigh RepresentativeFederica MogheriniExt
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Courts
A court is a tribunal, often as a government institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters in accordance with the rule of law.[1] In both common law and civil law legal systems, courts are the central means for dispute resolution, and it is generally understood that all persons have an ability to bring their claims before a court. Similarly, the rights of those accused of a crime include the right to present a defense before a court. The system of courts that interprets and applies the law is collectively known as the judiciary. The place where a court sits is known as a venue
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Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Tuaisceart Éireann [ˈt̪ˠuəʃcəɾˠt̪ˠ ˈeːɾʲən̪ˠ] ( listen);[8] Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the north-east of the island of Ireland,[9][10] variously described as a country, province or region.[11][12][13] Northern Ireland
Ireland
shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland. In 2011, its population was 1,810,863,[4] constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK's population
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Legislator
A legislator (or lawmaker) is a person who writes and passes laws, especially someone who is a member of a legislature. Legislators are usually politicians and are often elected by the people of the state. Legislatures may be supra-national (for example, the European Parliament), national (for example, the United States Congress), regional (for example, the National Assembly for Wales), or local (for example, local authorities).Contents1 Overview 2 Terminology 3 Substitute legislator 4 References 5 See alsoOverview[edit] The political theory of the separation of powers requires legislators to be different individuals from the members of the executive and the judiciary. Certain political systems adhere to this principle, others do not
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Regulations
Regulation is an abstract concept of management of complex systems according to a set of rules and trends. In systems theory, these types of rules exist in various fields of biology and society, but the term has slightly different meanings according to context
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Rulemaking
In administrative law, rule-making is the process that executive and independent agencies use to create, or promulgate, regulations. In general, legislatures first set broad policy mandates by passing statutes, then agencies create more detailed regulations through rulemaking. By bringing detailed scientific and other types of expertise to bear on policy, the rulemaking process has been the means by which some of the most far-reaching government regulations of the 20th century have been created. For example, science-based regulations are critical to modern programs for environmental protection, food safety, and workplace safety
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Privy Council
A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically, but not always, in the context of a monarchic government. The word "privy" means "private" or "secret"; thus, a privy council was originally a committee of the monarch's closest advisors to give confidential advice on state affairs.Contents1 Privy councils1.1 Functioning privy councils 1.2 Former or dormant privy councils2 See also 3 ReferencesPrivy councils[edit] Functioning privy councils[edit] Belgium: Crown Council of Belgium  Bhutan: Privy Council of Bhutan  Brunei: Privy Council of Brunei  Canada: Queen's Privy Council for Canada  Cambodia: Supreme Privy Council of His Majesty the King of Cambodia  Denmark: Danish Council of State  
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