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Archdeacon Of Colchester
The Archdeacon of Colchester is a senior ecclesiastical officer in the Diocese of Chelmsford[1] – she or he has responsibilities within her archdeaconry (the Archdeaconry of Colchester) including oversight of church buildings and some supervision, discipline and pastoral care of the clergy.Contents1 History 2 List of archdeacons2.1 High Medieval 2.2 Late Medieval 2.3 Early modern 2.4 Late modern3 Notes 4 References 5 SourcesHistory[edit] The title first appears in sources before 1144, as one of four archdeacons in the (then much larger) Diocese of London, but there had been four archdeacons prior to this point, some of whom may be regarded as essentially predecessors in the line of the Colchester archdeacons
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Ecclesiastical
In Christian theology, ecclesiology is the study of the Christian Church, the origins of Christianity, its relationship to Jesus, its role in salvation, its polity, its discipline, its destiny, and its leadership
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Bishop Of Colchester
The Bishop of Colchester
Colchester
is an episcopal title used by an area bishop of the Church of England
Church of England
Diocese
Diocese
of Chelmsford, in the Province of Canterbury, England.[1] The current bishop is Roger Morris, former Archdeacon of Worcester, who was consecrated as the Bishop of Colchester
Colchester
on 25 July 2014 at St Paul's Cathedral.[2] The title takes its name after the town of Colchester
Colchester
in Essex, and was first created under the Suffragan Bishops Act 1534.[3] The suffragan bishops have been under the jurisdiction of a number of different dioceses. They were originally appointed for the Diocese
Diocese
of London, but changed in 1845 for the Diocese
Diocese
of Rochester and again in 1877 for the Diocese
Diocese
of St Albans
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Charles Moss (bishop Of Bath And Wells)
Charles Moss (3 January 1711/12 – 13 April 1802) was an Anglican clergyman who served as Bishop of St David's from 1766 to 1774 and Bishop of Bath and Wells from 1774 to 1802. Biography[edit] Born in Postwick, Norfolk, England, Moss was son of William Moss, a grazier and large landowner of Postwick. He was educated under Mr Reddington at Norwich School and at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He graduated BA in 1731, was ordained by Thomas Gooch at Bristol in 1737, and was a fellow of Caius from 1735 to 1739.[1] Moss served as prebendary of Warminster, (1738–1740) and of Hurstbourne and Burbage, Diocese of Salisbury, (1740–1786); as residential canon of Salisbury, 1746–1786; Archdeacon of Colchester, St
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William Powell (Archdeacon Of Colchester)
William Samuel Powell, D.D. (b Colchester 4 July 1717 - d Colchester 19 January 1775) was an eighteenth century academic and priest, most notably Vice Chancellor of the University of Cambridge from 1765 until 1766;[1] and Archdeacon of Colchester from 1766 until his death.[2] Powell was born in Colchester. He was educated at Colchester Royal Grammar School and St John's College, Cambridge:[3] he was successively Fellow, Tutor, Taxor and Master[4] Powell was ordained in 1741; and held livings at Colkirk, Stibbard and Freshwater. Notes[edit]^ University of Cambridge (1) ^ Horn, Joyce M. (1974), Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541–1857, 3, p. 59  ^ University of Cambridge (2) ^ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66654 A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 3 (1959; Editor J. P. C
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Anthony Hamilton (Archdeacon Of Colchester)
Anthony Hamilton (1739–1812) was an English Anglican priest, Archdeacon of Colchester from 1775.[1][2] Life[edit] His father Alexander Hamilton was the fifth son of William Hamilton the antiquarian, who died in 1724.[3] He had married the heiress Charlotte Styles, and so acquired the Essex manor of Holyfield (Hallifield), in the north-east of the parish of Waltham Abbey which remained in the family into the 19th century.[4] The Hamilton family owned also the Debden Hall farm and estate (see Debden House).[5] The owner of Debden Hall was Alex. Hamilton on a map of 1777.[6] Venn's Alumni Cantabrigienses proposes the identification of Alexander Hamilton as the London solicitor of the name.[1] He moved to Loughton, transferring the remains of Charlotte and three children to be reburied there in 1744.[7] Anthony Hamilton junior was a younger son of the marriage.[8] He was educated at Harrow School and entered Corpus Christi College, Cambridge in 1755. He graduated B.A
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Joseph Jefferson (priest)
Joseph Jefferson was Archdeacon of Colchester from 1812 until his death on 28 December 1821.[1] At the time of his death he was Rector of Weeley and Vicar of Witham.[2] His son, also called Joseph, was an Anglican clergyman.[3] Notes[edit]^ 'Died' The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, January 1, 1822; Issue 16444 ^ 'Births, Deaths, Marriages and Obituaries' "Jackson's Oxford Journal" (Oxford, England), Saturday, January 5, 1822; Issue 3584 ^ Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students, Graduates and Holders of Office at the University of Cambridge, from the Earliest Times to 1900 Vol. iii
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Charles James Blomfield
Charles James Blomfield
Charles James Blomfield
(29 May 1786 – 5 August 1857) was a British divine and classicist, and a Church of England
Church of England
bishop for 32 years.<
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William Lyall (priest)
William Rowe Lyall (11 February 1788 – 17 February 1857) was an English churchman, Dean of Canterbury from 1845 to 1857.Contents1 Life 2 Literary works 3 Family 4 NotesLife[edit] He was born in Stepney, Middlesex, the fifth son of John Lyall and Jane Comyn. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (M.A. 1816). In 1817 he married Catherine Brandreth (1792–1863), daughter of Dr. Brandreth of Liverpool. Lyall was editor of the British Critic 1816–17 and associated with the Hackney Phalanx, the high-church group. He became editor of the Theological Library (1832–46). He early recognized a Catholic tendency in John Henry Newman's writing
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Sir Herbert Oakeley, 3rd Baronet
Sir Herbert Oakeley, 3rd Baronet (1791–1845) was an English churchman, archdeacon of Colchester from 1841. Life[edit] The third son of Sir Charles Oakeley, 1st Baronet, he was born in Madras on 10 February 1791, and brought to England in 1794 by his family. After some years at Westminster School, he entered Christ Church, Oxford. In 1810 he took a first-class in literæ humaniores, graduated B.A. on 23 February 1811, and obtained a senior studentship. He proceeded M.A. on 4 November 1813.[1] Oakeley was ordained, and became in 1814 domestic chaplain to William Howley, then Bishop of London, to whom he owed subsequent preferment, and resided with the bishop for 12 years, until his marriage. He was presented by Howley to the vicarage of Ealing in 1822, and to the prebendal stall of Wenlock's Barn in St Paul's Cathedral. As a married man he took up residence at Ealing.[1] By the death of his elder brother Charles, without male issue, Oakeley succeeded in 1830 to the baronetcy
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Charles Burney (Archdeacon Of Colchester)
Charles Parr Burney (1786-1864) was an Anglican Archdeacon in the middle of the Nineteenth Century.[1] The son of a doctor,[2] Burney was born in Chiswick, educated at Merton College, Oxford and became the incumbent at Sible Hedingham. Later, he was Archdeacon of St Albans from 1840 to 1845; and then of Colchester until his death.[3] He died on 1 November 1864:[4] His son, also called Charles, was Archdeacon of Kingston-upon-Thames from 1879 to 1904.[5] References[edit]^ Foster, J, ed. (1888). Alumni Oxonienses: the members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886; their parentage, birthplace and year of birth, with a record of their degrees. Being the matriculation register of the University. Vol I. Oxford: Parker & Co. p. 195.  ^ Richardson, Edmund (7 February 2013). Classical Victorians: Scholars, Scoundrels and Generals in Pursuit of Antiquity. Cambridge University Press. p. 194
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William Ady
The Ven.[1] William Brice Ady[2] (1816-1882) was Archdeacon of Colchester from 1864 until his death.[3] Ady was born in Devonport, Devon, educated at Exeter College, Oxford and was the Rector at Little Baddow[4] from 1857. References[edit]^ Ecclesiastical Intelligence The Essex Standard, and General Advertiser for the Eastern Counties (Colchester, England), Wednesday, January 13, 1869; Issue 1987. British Library Newspapers, Part II: 1800-1900 ^ National Archives ^ "Alumni Oxonienses: the members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886; their parentage, birthplace and year of birth, with a record of their degrees
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Alfred Blomfield
Alfred Blomfield[1] (31 August 1833[2] – 5 November 1894)[3][4] was an Anglican bishop[5] in the last decades of the 19th century. Alfred was the son of Charles James Blomfield, Bishop of London,[6] and brother of the architect Arthur Blomfield. He was educated at Harrow and Balliol College, Oxford before being awarded a Fellowship at All Souls College, Oxford, where he gained his Bachelor of Arts (BA) in 1855 and his Oxford Master of Arts (MA Oxon) in 1857.[2] From 1857, he was a Curate at Kidderminster, then its Vicar,[7] having been ordained priest in 1858[2] (and presumably deacon the previous year). After this, he held further incumbencies in Stepney, Islington, and Barking, before becoming Archdeacon of Essex in the Diocese of St Albans (1878–1882).[7] From there he moved to become Archdeacon of Colchester in the same diocese, and at the same time the first Bishop of Colchester (a suffragan bishop) in over 200 years, for twelve years[8] until 1894
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Henry Johnson (bishop)
Henry Frank Johnson (17 December 1834 – 1908) was an eminent Anglican Bishop [1] in the last decade of the 19th century and the first decade of the 20th.[2] He was born 17 December 1834, youngest son of Colonel Johnson of Walbury, Great Hallingbury.[3] Educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge,[4] from 1856 to 1858 he was a Cornet in the Royal Dragoons after which he studied for ordination at Wells Theological College. Following a curacy at Richmond, Surrey he was Vicar of High Wych, Sawbridgeworth and then Rector of Chelmsford.[5] After this he was Archdeacon of Essex,[6] before being appointed Bishop of Colchester in 1895.[7] He remained Bishop of Colchester until his death in 1908.[8] In December 1901 he was appointed Honorary Chaplain to the Essex Imperial Yeomanry.[9] References[edit]^ ”Church History in Queen Victoria's Reign” Fowler,M: Whitefish Kessinger Publishing, 2005 ISBN 1-4179-7356-0 ^ “Who was Who” 1897-2007 London, A & C Black, 2007 ISBN&
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William Beveridge (bishop)
William Beveridge (1637 – 5 March 1708) was an English writer and clergyman who served as Bishop of St Asaph
Bishop of St Asaph
from 1704 until his death.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Son of the Rev. William Beveridge, B.D., he was born at Barrow, near Leicester, and baptised on February 21, 1637, at Barrow, Leicestershire, of which his grandfather, father, and elder brother John were successively vicars.[1] He was first taught by his learned father and for two years was sent to Oakham School, Rutland, where William Cave
William Cave
was his school fellow. On May 24, 1653, he was admitted a sizar in St John's College, Cambridge,[2] with Bullingham as his tutor. Dr. Anthony Tuckney
Anthony Tuckney
was then head of the college, and took a special interest in young Beveridge. Beveridge specially devoted himself to the learned languages, including the oriental
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Robert Whitcombe
The Rev Robert Henry Whitcombe (1862–1922) was an eminent Anglican Bishop in the early decades of the twentieth century.[1] Educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, from 1886 to 1899 he was a schoolmaster at Wellington College and then Eton. After this he was Rector of Hardwick, Buckinghamshire and then Vicar of Romford[2] before a 13-year spell as Bishop of Colchester from 1909.[3] A memorial window to him is situated on the south wall of St Mary at the Walls, Colchester.[4] Notes[edit]^ “Who was Who” 1897-2007 London, A & C Black, 2007 ISBN 978-0-19-954087-7 ^ "The Clergy List, Clerical Guide and Ecclesiastical Directory" London, John Phillips, 1900 ^ New Bishop Suffragan Of Colchester. The Times Monday, Dec 21, 1908; pg
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