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Arbella Stuart
Lady Arbella Stuart
Lady Arbella Stuart
(or "Arabella" and/or "Stewart") (1575 – 25 September 1615) was an English noblewoman who was for some time considered a possible successor to Queen Elizabeth I of England. Stuart was the only child of Charles Stuart, 1st Earl of Lennox
Charles Stuart, 1st Earl of Lennox
(of the third creation), by his marriage to Elizabeth Cavendish. She was a grandchild of Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl of Lennox
Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl of Lennox
(of the second creation) and Lady Margaret Douglas, who was in turn the daughter of Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus, and of Queen Margaret Tudor, the widow of James IV of Scotland
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Nottinghamshire
Coordinates: 53°10′N 1°00′W / 53.167°N 1.000°W / 53.167; -1.000This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Maria Of Portugal (1538-1577)
Infanta Maria of Guimarães (12 August 1538 – 7 September 1577) was a Portuguese infanta, daughter of Infante Duarte, Duke of Guimarães (son of King Manuel I of Portugal), and Isabel of Braganza. She married Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma and Piacenza on November 11, 1565. She was Hereditary Princess of Parma by marriage. Issue[edit]Name Birth Death NotesMargherita Farnese 7 November 1567 13 April 1643 married, 1581, Vincenzo I, Duke of Mantua; no issueRanuccio Farnese 28 March 1569 5 March 1622 succeeded as Duke of Parma married, 1600, Margherita Aldobrandini; had issueOdoardo Farnese 7 December 1573 21 February 1626 became a CardinalAncestry[edit]Ancestors of Infanta Maria of Guimarães16. Edward I of Portugal8. Ferdinand, Duke of Viseu17. Eleanor of Aragon4. Manuel I of Portugal18. John, Constable of Portugal9. Beatrice of Portugal19. Isabel of Barcelos2. Duarte, Duke of Guimarães20. John II of Aragon10. Ferdinand II of Aragon21
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James VI Of Scotland
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
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Lute
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(early lutes) Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(modern lutes)Related instrumentsListAngélique Archlute Balalaika Barbat Bağlama Biwa Bouzouki Charango Chitarra Italiana Cobza Dombra Domra Dutar Guitar Kobza Komuz Kopuz Laouto Mandocello Mandola Mandolin Mandolute Oud Pandura Pipa Tambur Tanbur Tembûr Theorbo Tiorbino TopshurA lute (/luːt/, or /ljuːt/)[1] is any plucked string instrument with a neck (either fretted or unfretted) and a deep round back enclosing a hollow cavity, usually with a sound hole or opening in the body. More specifically, the term "lute" can refer to an instrument from the family of European lutes. The term also refers generally to any string instrument having the strings running in a plane parallel to the sound table (in the Hornbostel–Sachs system)
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Viol
The viol /ˈvaɪəl/,[1] viola da gamba[2] [viˈɔːla da ˈɡamba], or (informally) gamba, is any one of a family of bowed, fretted and stringed instruments with hollow wooden bodies and pegboxes where the tension on the strings can be increased or decreased to adjust the pitch of each of the strings. Frets
Frets
on the viol are usually made of gut, tied on the fingerboard around the instrument's neck, to enable the performer to stop the strings more cleanly. Frets
Frets
improve consistency of intonation and lend the stopped notes a tone which better matches the open strings
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Virginals
The virginals[a] or virginal is a keyboard instrument of the harpsichord family. It was popular in Europe during the late Renaissance and early baroque periods.Contents1 Description 2 Mechanism 3 Etymology 4 History 5 Types5.1 Spinet
Spinet
virginals 5.2 Muselars 5.3 Ottavini 5.4 Double virginals6 Compass and pitch 7 Decoration 8 Composers and collections of works 9 Further reading 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksDescription[edit] A virginal is a smaller and simpler rectangular form of the harpsichord with only one string per note running more or less parallel to the keyboard on the long side of the case. Many, if not most, of the instruments were constructed without legs, and would be placed on a table for playing. Later models were built with their own stands. Mechanism[edit] The mechanism of the virginals is identical to the harpsichord's, in that its wire strings are plucked by plectra mounted in jacks
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Philip III Of Spain
Philip III (Spanish: Felipe; 14 April 1578 – 31 March 1621) was King of Spain. He was also, as Philip II, King of Portugal, Naples, Sicily and Sardinia and Duke of Milan
Duke of Milan
from 1598 until his death. A member of the House of Habsburg, Philip III was born in Madrid
Madrid
to King Philip II of Spain
Philip II of Spain
and his fourth wife and niece Anna, the daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II and Maria of Spain. Philip III later married his cousin Margaret of Austria, sister of Ferdinand II, Holy Roman Emperor. Although also known in Spain
Spain
as Philip the Pious,[1] Philip's political reputation abroad has been largely negative – an 'undistinguished and insignificant man,' a 'miserable monarch,' whose 'only virtue appeared to reside in a total absence of vice,' to quote historians C. V. Wedgwood, R. Stradling and J. H
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Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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House Of Savoy
Disputed:Vittorio Emanuele, Prince
Prince
of Naples Prince
Prince
Amedeo, Duke of AostaFinal ruler Umberto II
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Ranuccio I Farnese, Duke Of Parma
Ranuccio I Farnese (28 March 1569 – 5 March 1622) reigned as Duke of Parma, Piacenza and Castro from 1592. A firm believer in absolute monarchy, Ranuccio, in 1594, centralised the administration of Parma and Piacenza, thus rescinding the nobles' hitherto vast prerogative. He is best remembered for the "Great Justice" of 1612, which saw the executions of a large number of Piacentine nobles suspected of plotting against him.[1] Claudia Colla his mistress and her mother were accused of using witchcraft to stop him from having offsprings, and both were sentenced to death by burning[2]
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Alexander Farnese, Duke Of Parma
Alexander Farnese (Italian: Alessandro Farnese, Spanish: Alejandro Farnesio) (27 August 1545 – 3 December 1592) was Duke of Parma, Piacenza and Castro from 1586 to 1592, and Governor of the Spanish Netherlands
Netherlands
from 1578 to 1592
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Isaac D'Israeli
Isaac D'Israeli
Isaac D'Israeli
(11 May 1766 – 19 January 1848) was a British writer, scholar and man of letters. He is best known for his essays, his associations with other men of letters, and as the father of British Prime Minister
Prime Minister
Benjamin Disraeli.Contents1 Life and career 2 Major works 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Isaac was born in Enfield, Middlesex, England, the only child of Benjamin D'Israeli (1730–1816), a Jewish merchant who had emigrated from Cento, Italy in 1748, and his second wife, Sarah Syprut de Gabay Villa Real (1742/3–1825). Isaac received much of his education in Leiden. At the age of 16, he began his literary career with some verses addressed to Samuel Johnson
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Court (royal)
A court is an extended royal household in a monarchy, including all those who regularly attend on a monarch, or another central figure. Hence the word court may also be applied to the coterie of a senior member of the nobility. Royal courts may have their seat in a designated place, several specific places, or be a mobile, itinerant court. In the largest courts, the royal households, many thousands of individuals comprised the court. These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court. Foreign princes and foreign nobility in exile may also seek refuge at a court. Near Eastern
Near Eastern
and Eastern courts often included the harem and concubines as well as eunuchs who fulfilled a variety of functions. At times, the harem was walled off and separate from the rest of the residence of the monarch
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Catholic Cardinal
A cardinal (Latin: Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae cardinalis, literally Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church) is a senior ecclesiastical leader, considered a Prince of the Church, and usually (now always for those created when still within the voting age-range) an ordained bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. The cardinals of the Church are collectively known as the College of Cardinals. The duties of the cardinals include attending the meetings of the College and making themselves available individually or in groups to the Pope as requested. Most have additional duties, such as leading a diocese or archdiocese or managing a department of the Roman Curia. A cardinal's primary duty is electing the bishop of Rome when the see becomes vacant. During the sede vacante (the period between a pope's death or resignation and the election of his successor), the day-to-day governance of the Holy See is in the hands of the College of Cardinals
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Defrock
Defrocking, unfrocking, or laicization of clergy is the removal of their rights to exercise the functions of the ordained ministry. It may be grounded on criminal convictions, disciplinary problems, or disagreements over doctrine or dogma, but may also be done at their request for personal reasons, such as running for civil office, taking over a family business, declining health or old age, desire to marry against the rules for clergy in a particular church, or an unresolved dispute. The form of the procedure varies according to the Christian denomination concerned
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