HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Arabic Music
StylesArchitecture of ancient Yemen Nabataean architecture Umayyad
Umayyad
architecture Abbasid architecture Fatimid architecture Moorish
Moorish
architecture Mamluk architectureFeaturesAblaq Hypostyle Mashrabiya Iwan Liwan Riwaq Qadad Moroccan riad Sahn Tadelak
[...More...]

"Arabic Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Riyad & Bayad
StylesArchitecture of ancient Yemen Nabataean architecture Umayyad architecture Abbasid architecture Fatimid architecture Moorish architecture Mamluk architectureFeaturesAblaq Hypostyle Mashrabiya Iwan Liwan Riwaq Qadad Moroccan riad Sahn Tadelakt Vaulting Voussoir Multifoil arch Horseshoe arch Arabic
Arabic
dome Alfiz Arabesque Banna'i Girih Islamic calligraphy Islamic geometric patterns Islamic interlace patterns Mocárabe Muqarnas Nagash painting Socarrat Yeseria Zellige Reflecting pool Howz Mosaic Windcatcher GardensTypesMadrasa Maqam Mazar Mosque Tekyeh Zawiya Sebil Shadirvan Bazaar Caravanserai Dar al-S
[...More...]

"Riyad & Bayad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Howz
In traditional Persian architecture, a howz (Persian: حوض‎) is a centrally positioned symmetrical axis pool. If in a traditional house or private courtyard, it is used for bathing, aesthetics or both.[1] If in a sahn of a mosque, it is used for performing ablutions. A howz is usually around 30 centimetres (12 in) deep
[...More...]

"Howz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islamic Calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is the artistic practice of handwriting and calligraphy, based upon the alphabet in the lands sharing a common Islamic cultural heritage. It includes Arabic Calligraphy, Ottoman, and Persian calligraphy.[1][2] It is known in Arabic as khatt Islami (خط اسلامي), meaning Islamic line, design, or construction.[3] The development of Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is strongly tied to the Qur'an; chapters and excerpts from the Qur'an
Qur'an
are a common and almost universal text upon which Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is based
[...More...]

"Islamic Calligraphy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islamic Geometric Patterns
Islamic decoration, which tends to avoid using figurative images, makes frequent use of geometric patterns which have developed over the centuries. The geometric designs in Islamic art
Islamic art
are often built on combinations of repeated squares and circles, which may be overlapped and interlaced, as can arabesques (with which they are often combined), to form intricate and complex patterns, including a wide variety of tessellations. These may constitute the entire decoration, may form a framework for floral or calligraphic embellishments, or may retreat into the background around other motifs
[...More...]

"Islamic Geometric Patterns" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mocárabe
Mocárabe, Honeycomb work, or Stalactite work (Arabic al-halimat al-'uliya, "the overhang") is an ornamental design used in certain types of Islamic architecture
Islamic architecture
that spread throughout the Islamic world in the 12th century. The design consists of a complex array of vertical prisms resembling stalactites. The terms mocárabe and muqarnas are similar and may be used interchangeably at times, but muqarnas do not necessarily have stalactite formations. The stalactite design may be a symbolic representation of the cave where Mohammed received the Koran.[citation needed] Mocárabe
Mocárabe
was used on friezes, vaults, windows, arches, and columns
[...More...]

"Mocárabe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muqarnas
Muqarnas
Muqarnas
(Arabic: مقرنص‎; Persian: مقرنس‎) is a form of ornamented vaulting in Islamic architecture, the "geometric subdivision of a squinch, or cupola, or corbel, into a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure", sometimes also called a "honeycomb" vault.[1] It is used for domes, and especially half-domes in entrances, iwans and apses, mostly in traditional Persian architecture. Where some elements project downwards, the style may be called mocárabe;[1][2] these are reminiscent of stalactites, and are sometimes called "stalactite vaults". Muqarnas
Muqarnas
developed around the middle of the 10th century in northeastern Iran
Iran
and almost simultaneously — but apparently independently — in North Africa
[...More...]

"Muqarnas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nagash Painting
Majlis painting (also called Nagash painting), is the decoration of the majlis or front parlor of traditional Arabic homes in the Asir province of Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
and adjoining parts of Yemen
Yemen
These wall paintings, an arabesque form of mural or fresco, show various geometric designs in bright colors: “Called nagash in Arabic, the wall paintings were a mark of pride for a woman in her house".[1] It was inscribed on UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2017 as Al-Qatt Al-Asiri.[2] The geometric designs and heavy lines seem to be adapted from the area’s textile and weaving patterns. “In contrast with the sobriety of architecture and decoration in the rest of Arabia, exuberant color and ornamentation characterize those of 'Asir. The painting extends into the house over the walls and doors, up the staircases, and onto the furniture itself
[...More...]

"Nagash Painting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Socarrat
Socarrat
Socarrat
refers to fired clay tiles covered with a white base and generally painted in red and black. These were placed between beams and joists in buildings’ ceilings and eaves. Their origin is typically medieval but subsequent production of these objects is known, mainly in Valencia. There are other words to name objects with similar function such as rajola, maó prim, atovó or cairó. The first register about its existence takes us back to 1604, when D. Feliciano de Figueroa, Bishop of Segorbe, refers to a group of roof and wall tiles written and coloured with koranic transcripts. Traditionally, they’re said to come from Paterna
Paterna
but the presence of these and other similar objects has been documented too in Manises
Manises
and in some other places in Valencia, Aragon
Aragon
and Catalonia
[...More...]

"Socarrat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yeseria
Yeseria
Yeseria
is a technique of carving plaster used by the Spanish Moors like also by the post-Reconsquista's Mudéjar
Mudéjar
architecture.[1] Plaster was often carved into geometric and Islamic-influenced motifs. The Alhambra
Alhambra
and the Córdoba Synagogue
Córdoba Synagogue
have many fine examples of yeseria.Wikimedia Commons has media related to Yeserias.See also[edit] Pargetting
Pargetting
for another tradition of decorative plasterwork Mudéjar
Mudéjar
architectureReferences[edit]^ Byne; Arthur Byne; Mildred Stapley Byne (1920). Decorated wooden ceilings in Spain. Harvard University: G.P
[...More...]

"Yeseria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zellige
Zellige
Zellige
(Arabic: [zˈliʑ] (Arabic: الزليج‎; also zelige or zellij) is mosaic tilework made from individually chiseled geometric tiles set into a plaster base.[1] This form of Islamic art is one of the main characteristics of Moroccan architecture. It consists of geometrically patterned mosaics, used to ornament walls, ceilings, fountains, floors, pools and tables.Contents1 History 2 Clays for Zellige 3 Forms and trends 4 Zellige
Zellige
craftsmanship 5 See also 6 References and notes 7 External linksHistory[edit] Further information: Islamic geometric patterns The Moorish art of zellige flourished during the Hispano-Moresque period (Azulejo) of the Maghreb
Maghreb
and the area known as Al-Andalus (modern day Spain) between 711-1492
[...More...]

"Zellige" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reflecting Pool
A reflecting pool or reflection pool is a water feature found in gardens, parks, and at memorial sites. It usually consists of a shallow pool of water, undisturbed by fountain jets, for a reflective surface.Contents1 Design 2 List of notable pools 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesDesign[edit] Reflecting pools are often designed with the outer basin floor at the rim slightly deeper than the central area to suppress wave formation. They can be as small as a bird bath to as large as a major civic element
[...More...]

"Reflecting Pool" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Windcatcher
A windtower (wind catcher) (Persian: بادگیر‎ bâdgir: bâd "wind" + gir "catcher") is a traditional Persian architectural element to create natural ventilation in buildings.[1] Windcatchers come in various designs: uni-directional, bi-directional, and multi-directional. The devices were used in ancient Egyptian architecture
[...More...]

"Windcatcher" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Banna'i
In Iranian architecture, banna'i (Persian: بنائی‎, "builder's technique" in Persian) is an architectural decorative art in which glazed tiles are alternated with plain bricks to create geometric patterns over the surface of a wall or to spell out sacred names or pious phrases.[1] This technique originated in Syria and Iraq in the 8th century, and matured in the Seljuq and Timurid era, as it spread to Iran, Anatolia and Central Asia. If the brickwork design is in relief then it is referred to as hazarbaf (Persian: هزارباف‎, compound of hazar "thousand" and baf "weavings", referring to the woven appearance of the bricks).[2] History[edit]The walls of the Samanid Mausoleum (9th or 10th century) represent an early example of hazarbaf, a weaving-like pattern of brickwork.The earliest surviving example of decorative brick work with colored bricks is found in the city gate of Raqqa (c. 772)
[...More...]

"Banna'i" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islamic Garden
Traditionally, an Islamic garden
Islamic garden
is a cool place of rest and reflection, and a reminder of paradise. The Qur'an
Qur'an
has many references to gardens, and the garden is used as an earthly analogue for the life in paradise which is promised to believers:Allah has promised to the believing men and the believing women gardens, beneath which rivers flow, to abide in them, and goodly dwellings in gardens of perpetual abode; and best of all is Allah's goodly pleasure; that is the grand achievement ( Qur'an
Qur'an
9.72)There are surviving formal Islamic gardens in a wide zone extending from Spain and Morocco in the west to India in the east
[...More...]

"Islamic Garden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.